Yass Queen
Yass Queen

Yass Queen

Yass Honey
Yass Honey

Yass Honey

Pull
Pull

Pull

She Doing
She Doing

She Doing

She Do
She Do

She Do

Bitching
Bitching

Bitching

M Yass
M Yass

M Yass

over
over

over

to-the-left
to-the-left

to-the-left

lil bitch
 lil bitch

lil bitch

🔥 | Latest

yass: TA 轉p ETER PAN PIPPILONGSTOKING+LINDGE ATHE WIZARD ERANK Jot OZ OSAUM the Lion ie i theterdenne C.S. LEWIS HOKEEK.TUMBLR.COM Potter LERBY HED HARRY PLEF nestofstraightlines: jabberwockypie: kyraneko: darkmagyk: seananmcguire: nokeek: Dorothy just wanted something that she could believe in,A gray dustbowl girl in a life she was better off leavin’.She made her escape, went from gray into green,And she could have got clear, and she could have got clean,But she chose to be good and go back to the gray Kansas skyWhere color’s a fable and freedom’s a fairy tale lie. Alice got lost, and I guess that we really can’t blame her;They say she got tangled and tied in the lies that became her.They say she went mad, and she never complained,For there’s peace of a kind in a life unconstrained.She gives Cheshire kisses, she’s easy with white rabbit smiles,And she’ll never be free, but she’s won herself safe for a while. Susan and Lucy were queens, and they ruled well and proudly.They honored their land and their lord, rang the bells long and loudly.They never once asked to return to their livesTo be children and chattel and mothers and wives,But the land cast them out in a lesson that only one learned;And one queen said ‘I am not a toy’, and she never returned. Mandy’s a pirate, and Mia weaves silk shrouds for faeries,And Deborah will pour you red wine pressed from sweet poisoned berries.Kate poses riddles and Mary plays tricks,While Kaia builds towers from brambles and sticks,And the rules that we live by are simple and clear:Be wicked and lovely and don’t live in fear        Dorothy, Alice and Wendy and Jane,        Susan and Lucy, we’re calling your names,        All the Lost Girls who came out of the rain        And chose to go back on the shelf.        Tinker Bell says, and I find I agree        You have to break rules if you want to break free.        So do as you like  — we’re determined to be        Wicked girls saving ourselves. For we will be wicked and we will be fairAnd they’ll call us such names, and we really won’t care,So go, tell your Wendys, your Susans, your Janes,There’s a place they can go if they’re tired of chains,And our roads may be golden, or broken, or lost,But we’ll walk on them willingly, knowing the cost  — We won’t take our place on the shelves.It’s better to fly and it’s better to dieSay the wicked girls saving ourselves. (Seanan McGuire) This is breathtaking. I heard this poem once a million years ago, I have been looking for it ever since, and had now found it.  I love it so much more then I remember.  You might be interested to know that she set it to music and it’s also a song. @darkmagyk And people have made fanvids set to it! (The CD is out of print right now - I have it and I love it so much, but I she’s re-printing a different one … soonish?) Mmmmm I get it but I’m not sure about the implication that real life is an inherent punishment for girls, and I find this kind of feminist take a little reactionary and keen to flatten out female characters and their stories into simple terms to make a kind of Yass Queen point. Anyway here’s a video I love examining the differences in feminist-related theming between the book and movie of The Wizard of Oz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz15yFVF1TI And here’s a Hark! A Vagrant comic that is very much that’s-it-that’s the-book re. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland:
yass: TA
 轉p ETER PAN
 PIPPILONGSTOKING+LINDGE
 ATHE WIZARD ERANK
 Jot OZ OSAUM
 the Lion ie i
 theterdenne
 C.S. LEWIS
 HOKEEK.TUMBLR.COM
 Potter
 LERBY HED
 HARRY PLEF
nestofstraightlines:

jabberwockypie:

kyraneko:

darkmagyk:

seananmcguire:

nokeek:

Dorothy just wanted something that she could believe in,A gray dustbowl girl in a life she was better off leavin’.She made her escape, went from gray into green,And she could have got clear, and she could have got clean,But she chose to be good and go back to the gray Kansas skyWhere color’s a fable and freedom’s a fairy tale lie.
Alice got lost, and I guess that we really can’t blame her;They say she got tangled and tied in the lies that became her.They say she went mad, and she never complained,For there’s peace of a kind in a life unconstrained.She gives Cheshire kisses, she’s easy with white rabbit smiles,And she’ll never be free, but she’s won herself safe for a while.
Susan and Lucy were queens, and they ruled well and proudly.They honored their land and their lord, rang the bells long and loudly.They never once asked to return to their livesTo be children and chattel and mothers and wives,But the land cast them out in a lesson that only one learned;And one queen said ‘I am not a toy’, and she never returned.
Mandy’s a pirate, and Mia weaves silk shrouds for faeries,And Deborah will pour you red wine pressed from sweet poisoned berries.Kate poses riddles and Mary plays tricks,While Kaia builds towers from brambles and sticks,And the rules that we live by are simple and clear:Be wicked and lovely and don’t live in fear
        Dorothy, Alice and Wendy and Jane,        Susan and Lucy, we’re calling your names,        All the Lost Girls who came out of the rain        And chose to go back on the shelf.        Tinker Bell says, and I find I agree        You have to break rules if you want to break free.        So do as you like 

— 

 we’re determined to be        Wicked girls saving ourselves.
For we will be wicked and we will be fairAnd they’ll call us such names, and we really won’t care,So go, tell your Wendys, your Susans, your Janes,There’s a place they can go if they’re tired of chains,And our roads may be golden, or broken, or lost,But we’ll walk on them willingly, knowing the cost 

— 

We won’t take our place on the shelves.It’s better to fly and it’s better to dieSay the wicked girls saving ourselves.
(Seanan McGuire)

This is breathtaking.

I heard this poem once a million years ago, I have been looking for it ever since, and had now found it. 
I love it so much more then I remember. 

You might be interested to know that she set it to music and it’s also a song.

@darkmagyk And people have made fanvids set to it! (The CD is out of print right now - I have it and I love it so much, but I she’s re-printing a different one … soonish?)

Mmmmm I get it but I’m not sure about the implication that real life is an inherent punishment for girls, and I find this kind of feminist take a little reactionary and keen to flatten out female characters and their stories into simple terms to make a kind of Yass Queen point. Anyway here’s a video I love examining the differences in feminist-related theming between the book and movie of The Wizard of Oz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz15yFVF1TI
And here’s a Hark! A Vagrant comic that is very much that’s-it-that’s the-book re. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland:

nestofstraightlines: jabberwockypie: kyraneko: darkmagyk: seananmcguire: nokeek: Dorothy just wanted something that she could belie...

yass: Justino Mora @JustinoMora1 Hector Barajas, a U.S. veteran, was deported in 2004. Today, our dear friend Hector won his battle against the U.S. government and will be allowed to return home, become a U.S. citizen, and reunite with his family! Hector will be sworn in as a citizen on April 13th in San Diego. Yass!! 💜🙌🏽😊 Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, will be allowed to return to the place he considers home and become a U.S. citizen. Barajas burst into joyous tears seated on a couch Thursday afternoon in front of a large American flag as he read a document informing him that he would be sworn in as a citizen on April 13 in San Diego. “Fourteen years, man,” Hector said, his voice cracking. “Oh my God, this is great. Hallelujah! Hallelujah!”. “I’m coming home, mom!” he added. Barajas was honorably discharged from the Army in 2001 but struggled readjusting to civilian life. He took a plea deal for a charge of shooting at an occupied car in 2002. Because of that conviction, the government took away his green card, and he was deported in 2004 after he finished a prison sentence. “I made bad decisions,” Barajas-Varela told the Union-Tribune last year about that time in his life. “I put myself in that situation... I wouldn’t put myself in that situation again.” Barajas founded the Deported Veterans Support House, known to many as “the Bunker,” in 2013 to support deportees in Tijuana. He became a leader in a push for legislative changes to help U.S. military veterans who had not become citizens avoid deportation and to bring back those who were already removed. He was born in Mexico but raised in Los Angeles from age seven. Since he had a green card, he was able to serve in the Army and was part of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1995 to 2001. At the time, he thought he’d automatically become a citizen, but that was not the case. Members of the military are allowed to apply for citizenship with no waiting period. They still have to fill out the paperwork and pass the tests. Noncitizens who serve in the military are still at risk for deportation if they commit crimes that can cause the U.S. to revoke their green cards."
yass: Justino Mora
 @JustinoMora1
 Hector Barajas, a U.S. veteran, was
 deported in 2004. Today, our dear friend
 Hector won his battle against the U.S.
 government and will be allowed to return
 home, become a U.S. citizen, and reunite
 with his family!
 Hector will be sworn in as a citizen on
 April 13th in San Diego.
Yass!! 💜🙌🏽😊 Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, will be allowed to return to the place he considers home and become a U.S. citizen. Barajas burst into joyous tears seated on a couch Thursday afternoon in front of a large American flag as he read a document informing him that he would be sworn in as a citizen on April 13 in San Diego. “Fourteen years, man,” Hector said, his voice cracking. “Oh my God, this is great. Hallelujah! Hallelujah!”. “I’m coming home, mom!” he added. Barajas was honorably discharged from the Army in 2001 but struggled readjusting to civilian life. He took a plea deal for a charge of shooting at an occupied car in 2002. Because of that conviction, the government took away his green card, and he was deported in 2004 after he finished a prison sentence. “I made bad decisions,” Barajas-Varela told the Union-Tribune last year about that time in his life. “I put myself in that situation... I wouldn’t put myself in that situation again.” Barajas founded the Deported Veterans Support House, known to many as “the Bunker,” in 2013 to support deportees in Tijuana. He became a leader in a push for legislative changes to help U.S. military veterans who had not become citizens avoid deportation and to bring back those who were already removed. He was born in Mexico but raised in Los Angeles from age seven. Since he had a green card, he was able to serve in the Army and was part of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1995 to 2001. At the time, he thought he’d automatically become a citizen, but that was not the case. Members of the military are allowed to apply for citizenship with no waiting period. They still have to fill out the paperwork and pass the tests. Noncitizens who serve in the military are still at risk for deportation if they commit crimes that can cause the U.S. to revoke their green cards."

Yass!! 💜🙌🏽😊 Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportatio...

yass: AFRICAN REFUGEE BECOMES MONTANA'S FIRST BLACK MAYOR IN MORE THAN A CENTURY BLACK ENTERPRISE.coM Yass! 🙌🏽👏🏽✊🏾 ProtectTPS . Via @undocublack Repost @blackenterprise: WilmotCollins, 54, moved to Montana 28 years ago when he fled Liberia in 1990 during the country’s first civil war. He told The Globe and Mail that during the war, frequently the only thing to eat was butter mixed with mayonnaise. Along with his wife and five relatives, they crammed themselves into a single room near the American Embassy hoping it would serve as a safe haven as fighting raged across the city. Collins and his wife, Maddie, fled Liberia to Ghana, the Ivory Coast and finally, the United States.⠀ ⠀ President Donald Trump’s attack on immigrants around the country is in full swing. In a state whose African American population is less than 1%, Montana resident Wilmot Collins, a former civil war refugee from Liberia who was fairly new to the political scene, saw an opening. He seized the opportunity to counter the president’s narrative by sharing his own story.⠀ ⠀ “When people can relate to the real deal, they’re wide-eyed, because all they’ve heard is what comes out of our leadership,” he told The Globe and Mail. “There’s no way when people hear your stories and struggles they can’t identify with you.”
yass: AFRICAN REFUGEE BECOMES
 MONTANA'S FIRST BLACK
 MAYOR IN MORE THAN A
 CENTURY
 BLACK
 ENTERPRISE.coM
Yass! 🙌🏽👏🏽✊🏾 ProtectTPS . Via @undocublack Repost @blackenterprise: WilmotCollins, 54, moved to Montana 28 years ago when he fled Liberia in 1990 during the country’s first civil war. He told The Globe and Mail that during the war, frequently the only thing to eat was butter mixed with mayonnaise. Along with his wife and five relatives, they crammed themselves into a single room near the American Embassy hoping it would serve as a safe haven as fighting raged across the city. Collins and his wife, Maddie, fled Liberia to Ghana, the Ivory Coast and finally, the United States.⠀ ⠀ President Donald Trump’s attack on immigrants around the country is in full swing. In a state whose African American population is less than 1%, Montana resident Wilmot Collins, a former civil war refugee from Liberia who was fairly new to the political scene, saw an opening. He seized the opportunity to counter the president’s narrative by sharing his own story.⠀ ⠀ “When people can relate to the real deal, they’re wide-eyed, because all they’ve heard is what comes out of our leadership,” he told The Globe and Mail. “There’s no way when people hear your stories and struggles they can’t identify with you.”

Yass! 🙌🏽👏🏽✊🏾 ProtectTPS . Via @undocublack Repost @blackenterprise: WilmotCollins, 54, moved to Montana 28 years ago when he fled Liberia...

yass: pizzabills:YASS HONEEYY
yass: pizzabills:YASS HONEEYY

pizzabills:YASS HONEEYY