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El Dia
El Dia

El Dia

Paras
Paras

Paras

Me Voy
Me Voy

Me Voy

Ba Dum
Ba Dum

Ba Dum

gimme
 gimme

gimme

las
 las

las

vida
 vida

vida

no
 no

no

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maize: 10 cm gaterade: dynastylnoire: taxloopholes: bottomwealthbinch: olt: Maize diversity corn for every kind of country girl hey please don’t I hate people country girls make DO
maize: 10 cm
gaterade:

dynastylnoire:


taxloopholes:

bottomwealthbinch:


olt:
Maize diversity

corn for every kind of country girl


hey please don’t 


I hate people 


country girls make DO

gaterade: dynastylnoire: taxloopholes: bottomwealthbinch: olt: Maize diversity corn for every kind of country girl hey please do...

maize: The Aztecs once fed 200,000 people in inarable swampy land by creating floating gardens that they farmed extensively. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com guayyaba: wildland-hymns: ultrafacts: How on earth would you feed a city of over 200,000 people when the land around you was a swampy lake? Seems like an impossible task, but the Aztec managed it by creating floating gardens known as chinampas, then they farmed them intensively. These ingenious creations were built up from the lake bed by piling layers of mud, decaying vegetation and reeds. This was a great way of recycling waste from the capital city Tenochtitlan. Each garden was framed and held together by wooden poles bound by reeds and then anchored to the lake floor with finely pruned willow trees. The Aztecs also dredged mud from the base of the canals which both kept the waterways clear and rejuvenate the nutrient levels in the gardens. A variety of crops were grown, most commonly maize or corn, beans, chillies, squash, tomatoes, edible greens such as quelite and amaranth. Colourful flowers were also grown, essential produce for religious festivals and ceremonies. Each plot was systematically planned, the effective use of seedbeds allowed continuous planting and harvesting of crops. Between each garden was a canal which enabled canoe transport. Fish and birds populated the water and were an additional source of food. [x] (Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts This is literally so cool. Not only does it contribute to spacial efficiency, but the canals would easily keep pests, weeds, and possibly even diseases out of the respective plots. Companion planting and bio-intensive planting would be so much easier. Water-wise systems would be inherently present. Plus it looks so super neat aesthetically. I am just all about this. Indigenous civilizations invented sustainable development way before there was a term for it.
maize: The Aztecs once fed 200,000 people in
 inarable swampy land by creating floating
 gardens that they farmed extensively.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com
guayyaba:
wildland-hymns:

ultrafacts:

How on earth would you feed a city of over 200,000 people when the land around you was a swampy lake? Seems like an impossible task, but the Aztec managed it by creating floating gardens known as chinampas, then they farmed them intensively.
These ingenious creations were built up from the lake bed by piling layers of mud, decaying vegetation and reeds. This was a great way of recycling waste from the capital city Tenochtitlan. Each garden was framed and held together by wooden poles bound by reeds and then anchored to the lake floor with finely pruned willow trees. The Aztecs also dredged mud from the base of the canals which both kept the waterways clear and rejuvenate the nutrient levels in the gardens.
A variety of crops were grown, most commonly maize or corn, beans, chillies, squash, tomatoes, edible greens such as quelite and amaranth. Colourful flowers were also grown, essential produce for religious festivals and ceremonies. Each plot was systematically planned, the effective use of seedbeds allowed continuous planting and harvesting of crops.
Between each garden was a canal which enabled canoe transport. Fish and birds populated the water and were an additional source of food. [x]
(Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts 

This is literally so cool. Not only does it contribute to spacial efficiency, but the canals would easily keep pests, weeds, and possibly even diseases out of the respective plots. Companion planting and bio-intensive planting would be so much easier. Water-wise systems would be inherently present. Plus it looks so super neat aesthetically. I am just all about this.


Indigenous civilizations invented sustainable development way before there was a term for it.

guayyaba: wildland-hymns: ultrafacts: How on earth would you feed a city of over 200,000 people when the land around you was a swampy l...

maize: A Malawian teenager named William Kamkwamba taught himself how to build a windmill out of junk and bring power to his village. He then went on to build a second, larger windmill to power irrigation pumps. He did this all from books he read in the library. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com WHOHAE WIND THE BOY OHARNESS nBryan Mealer Ekeabeth Zunon A ouwd sothond below nd ghzed at thi stranje machinc ultrafacts: William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians or aid groups to do it for him. The need for action was even greater in 2002 following one of Malawi’s worst droughts, which killed thousands of people and left his family on the brink of starvation. Unable to attend school, he kept up his education by using a local library. Fascinated by science, his life changed one day when he picked up a tattered textbook and saw a picture of a windmill. Mr Kamkwamba told the BBC News website: “I was very interested when I saw the windmill could make electricity and pump water. “I thought: ‘That could be a defense against hunger. Maybe I should build one for myself’.” When not helping his family farm maize, he plugged away at his prototype, working by the light of a paraffin lamp in the evenings. But his ingenious project met blank looks in his community of about 200 people. “Many, including my mother, thought I was going crazy,” he recalls. “They had never seen a windmill before.” [x] In 2014, William Kamkwamba received his 4 year degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student. (Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts
maize: A Malawian teenager named William
 Kamkwamba taught himself how to build a
 windmill out of junk and bring power to his
 village. He then went on to build a second,
 larger windmill to power irrigation pumps. He
 did this all from books he read in the library.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com

 WHOHAE WIND
 THE BOY
 OHARNESS
 nBryan Mealer
 Ekeabeth Zunon
 A ouwd sothond below nd ghzed at thi stranje machinc
ultrafacts:

William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians or aid groups to do it for him. The need for action was even greater in 2002 following one of Malawi’s worst droughts, which killed thousands of people and left his family on the brink of starvation.
Unable to attend school, he kept up his education by using a local library. Fascinated by science, his life changed one day when he picked up a tattered textbook and saw a picture of a windmill. Mr Kamkwamba told the BBC News website: “I was very interested when I saw the windmill could make electricity and pump water.
“I thought: ‘That could be a defense against hunger. Maybe I should build one for myself’.” When not helping his family farm maize, he plugged away at his prototype, working by the light of a paraffin lamp in the evenings. But his ingenious project met blank looks in his community of about 200 people.
“Many, including my mother, thought I was going crazy,” he recalls. “They had never seen a windmill before.” [x]
In 2014, William Kamkwamba received his 4 year degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student.
(Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts: William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politician...

maize: when you're in biology class and realize there are only two genders O @hkhwyw sgaprivilege: sonoanthony: hatingongodot: fandomsandfeminism: wuuthradical: fandomsandfeminism: wuuthradical: fandomsandfeminism: wuuthradical: themagicofthenight: Well considering gender has literally nothing to do with biology I doubt that would happen. Gender has everything to do with biology. We wouldn’t have a binary without it. They’re inseparable. Surprise: There is no binary. The binary is an oversimplification that is largely contextualized within Western culture.  We wouldn’t be here right now if there wasn’t a gender binary. Complex lifeforms need one to perpetuate themselves. Also incorrect. Sex is a spectrum. You’ll find that reality is rarely as simple as pure and uncompromising binaries.  Sex isn’t chromosomes: the story of a century of misconceptions about X YThe influence of the XX/XY model of chromosomal sex has been profound over the last century, but it’s founded on faulty premises and responsible for encouraging reductive, essentialist thinking. While the scientific world has moved on, its popular appeal remains. Have you considered that those scientists might be bias and pushing an agenda. Gender is a biological absolute. Gender is highly contextualized by time and place. Like, if you want to talk about scientists being biased and pushing an agenda, look at modern western science for pushing a flawed binary narrative. Non-binary genders are not a modern invention. The idea of third genders/non-binary genders is as old as human civilization, because gender is socially constructed and subjective, and people’s ideas about gender have changed over time and between cultures. In Mesopotamian mythology, among the earliest written records of humanity, there are references to types of people who are not men and not women. In a Sumerian creation myth found on a stone tablet from the second millennium BC, the goddess Ninmah fashions a being “with no male organ and no female organ”, for whom Enki finds a position in society: “to stand before the king”. In Babylonia, Sumer and Assyria, certain types of individuals who performed religious duties in the service of Inanna/Ishtar have been described as a third gender. Inscribed pottery shards from the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (2000–1800 BCE), found near ancient Thebes (now Luxor, Egypt), list three human genders: tai (male), sḫt (“sekhet”) and hmt (female). The Vedas (c. 1500 BC–500 BC) describe individuals as belonging to one of three categories, according to one’s nature or prakrti. These are also spelled out in the Kama Sutra (c. 4th century AD) and elsewhere as pums-prakrti (male-nature), stri-prakrti (female-nature), and tritiya-prakrti (third-nature). Many have interpreted the “eunuchs” of the Ancient Eastern Mediterranean world as a third gender that inhabited a liminal space between women and men, understood in their societies as somehow neither or both. In the Historia Augusta, the eunuch body is described as a tertium genus hominum (a third human gender), The ancient Maya civilization may have recognised a third gender, according to historian Matthew Looper. Looper notes the androgynous Maize Deity and masculine Moon goddess of Maya mythology, and iconography and inscriptions where rulers embody or impersonate these deities. He suggests that the third gender could also include two-spirit individuals with special roles such as healers or diviners Anthropologist Rosemary Joyce agrees, writing that “gender was a fluid potential, not a fixed category, before the Spaniards came to Mesoamerica. Childhood training and ritual shaped, but did not set, adult gender, which could encompass third genders and alternative sexualities as well as “male” and “female.” At the height of the Classic period, Maya rulers presented themselves as embodying the entire range of gender possibilities, from male through female, by wearing blended costumes and playing male and female roles in state ceremonies.“ Andean Studies scholar Michael Horswell writes that third-gendered ritual attendants to chuqui chinchay, a jaguar deity in Incan mythology, were “vital actors in Andean ceremonies” prior to Spanish colonisation. Two-spirit individuals are viewed in some Native American cultures as having two identities occupying one body. Their dress is usually a mixture of traditionally male and traditionally female articles, or they may dress as a man one day, and a woman on another. In Pakistan, the hijras are officially recognized as third gender by the government, [Source] [source] [source] [Source] [Source] [source] [source][source] [Read More] [Read more] [Read more] it’s amazing how quickly “science says there are only two genders” becomes “have you considered that science is fake and is pushing an agenda?” I’m a biologist and I can assure you the 2 gender binary doesn’t exist. All around we see animals that don’t fall into either categories. Gender is a spectrum is the realest line there is when it comes to biology and gender. Cis people: Science says the truth. Science: *Says they’re wrong* Cis people: Actually, you know what, science is bad and is lying.
maize: when you're in biology class and realize
 there are only two genders
 O @hkhwyw
sgaprivilege:
sonoanthony:

hatingongodot:


fandomsandfeminism:

wuuthradical:

fandomsandfeminism:

wuuthradical:

fandomsandfeminism:

wuuthradical:

themagicofthenight:

Well considering gender has literally nothing to do with biology I doubt that would happen.

Gender has everything to do with biology. We wouldn’t have a binary without it. They’re inseparable.

Surprise: There is no binary. The binary is an oversimplification that is largely contextualized within Western culture. 

We wouldn’t be here right now if there wasn’t a gender binary. Complex lifeforms need one to perpetuate themselves.

Also incorrect. Sex is a spectrum. You’ll find that reality is rarely as simple as pure and uncompromising binaries. 
Sex isn’t chromosomes: the story of a century of misconceptions about X  YThe influence of the XX/XY model of chromosomal sex has been profound over the last century, but it’s founded on faulty premises and responsible for encouraging reductive, essentialist thinking. While the scientific world has moved on, its popular appeal remains.

Have you considered that those scientists might be bias and pushing an agenda. Gender is a biological absolute.

Gender is highly contextualized by time and place. Like, if you want to talk about scientists being biased and pushing an agenda, look at modern western science for pushing a flawed binary narrative.
Non-binary genders are not a modern invention. The idea of third genders/non-binary genders is as old as human civilization, because gender is socially constructed and subjective, and people’s ideas about gender have changed over time and between cultures.
In Mesopotamian mythology, among the earliest written records of humanity, there are references to types of people who are not men and not women. In a Sumerian creation myth found on a stone tablet from the second millennium BC, the goddess Ninmah fashions a being “with no male organ and no female organ”, for whom Enki finds a position in society: “to stand before the king”.
In Babylonia, Sumer and Assyria, certain types of individuals who performed religious duties in the service of Inanna/Ishtar have been described as a third gender.
Inscribed pottery shards from the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (2000–1800 BCE), found near ancient Thebes (now Luxor, Egypt), list three human genders: tai (male), sḫt (“sekhet”) and hmt (female).
The Vedas (c. 1500 BC–500 BC) describe individuals as belonging to one of three categories, according to one’s nature or prakrti. These are also spelled out in the Kama Sutra (c. 4th century AD) and elsewhere as pums-prakrti (male-nature), stri-prakrti (female-nature), and tritiya-prakrti (third-nature).
Many have interpreted the “eunuchs” of the Ancient Eastern Mediterranean world as a third gender that inhabited a liminal space between women and men, understood in their societies as somehow neither or both. In the Historia Augusta, the eunuch body is described as a tertium genus hominum (a third human gender),
The ancient Maya civilization may have recognised a third gender, according to historian Matthew Looper. Looper notes the androgynous Maize Deity and masculine Moon goddess of Maya mythology, and iconography and inscriptions where rulers embody or impersonate these deities. He suggests that the third gender could also include two-spirit individuals with special roles such as healers or diviners
Anthropologist Rosemary Joyce agrees, writing that “gender was a fluid potential, not a fixed category, before the Spaniards came to Mesoamerica. Childhood training and ritual shaped, but did not set, adult gender, which could encompass third genders and alternative sexualities as well as “male” and “female.” At the height of the Classic period, Maya rulers presented themselves as embodying the entire range of gender possibilities, from male through female, by wearing blended costumes and playing male and female roles in state ceremonies.“
Andean Studies scholar Michael Horswell writes that third-gendered ritual attendants to chuqui chinchay, a jaguar deity in Incan mythology, were “vital actors in Andean ceremonies” prior to Spanish colonisation. 
Two-spirit individuals are viewed in some Native American cultures as having two identities occupying one body. Their dress is usually a mixture of traditionally male and traditionally female articles, or they may dress as a man one day, and a woman on another. 
In Pakistan, the hijras are officially recognized as third gender by the government,
[Source] [source] [source] [Source] [Source] [source] [source][source]
[Read More] [Read more] [Read more]


it’s amazing how quickly “science says there are only two genders” becomes “have you considered that science is fake and is pushing an agenda?”


I’m a biologist and I can assure you the 2 gender binary doesn’t exist. All around we see animals that don’t fall into either categories. Gender is a spectrum is the realest line there is when it comes to biology and gender.

Cis people: Science says the truth.
Science: *Says they’re wrong*
Cis people: Actually, you know what, science is bad and is lying.

sgaprivilege: sonoanthony: hatingongodot: fandomsandfeminism: wuuthradical: fandomsandfeminism: wuuthradical: fandomsandfeminism:...

maize: A Malawian teenager named William Kamkwamba taught himself how to build a windmill out of junk and bring power to his village. He then went on to build a second, larger windmill to power irrigation pumps. He did this all from books he read in the library. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com THE İESSEO WHOEWIND OHARNESS nd Beryan Mealer Ekzabeth Standes atup Wllwmshautod whethe buys tiged and heave Acnwed gathored below and gazod at this strange machinc yor para tool th into the forst nativepeopleproblems: 1017sosa300: ultrafacts: William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians or aid groups to do it for him. The need for action was even greater in 2002 following one of Malawi’s worst droughts, which killed thousands of people and left his family on the brink of starvation. Unable to attend school, he kept up his education by using a local library. Fascinated by science, his life changed one day when he picked up a tattered textbook and saw a picture of a windmill. Mr Kamkwamba told the BBC News website: “I was very interested when I saw the windmill could make electricity and pump water. “I thought: ‘That could be a defense against hunger. Maybe I should build one for myself’.” When not helping his family farm maize, he plugged away at his prototype, working by the light of a paraffin lamp in the evenings. But his ingenious project met blank looks in his community of about 200 people. “Many, including my mother, thought I was going crazy,” he recalls. “They had never seen a windmill before.” [x] In 2014, William Kamkwamba received his 4 year degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student. (Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts The power of books That’s so cool! What a blessing he must be.
maize: A Malawian teenager named William
 Kamkwamba taught himself how to build a
 windmill out of junk and bring power to his
 village. He then went on to build a second,
 larger windmill to power irrigation pumps. He
 did this all from books he read in the library.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com

 THE İESSEO
 WHOEWIND
 OHARNESS
 nd Beryan Mealer
 Ekzabeth
 Standes atup Wllwmshautod
 whethe buys tiged and heave
 Acnwed gathored below and gazod at this strange machinc
 yor para
 tool th
 into the forst
nativepeopleproblems:
1017sosa300:

ultrafacts:

William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians or aid groups to do it for him. The need for action was even greater in 2002 following one of Malawi’s worst droughts, which killed thousands of people and left his family on the brink of starvation.
Unable to attend school, he kept up his education by using a local library. Fascinated by science, his life changed one day when he picked up a tattered textbook and saw a picture of a windmill. Mr Kamkwamba told the BBC News website: “I was very interested when I saw the windmill could make electricity and pump water.
“I thought: ‘That could be a defense against hunger. Maybe I should build one for myself’.” When not helping his family farm maize, he plugged away at his prototype, working by the light of a paraffin lamp in the evenings. But his ingenious project met blank looks in his community of about 200 people.
“Many, including my mother, thought I was going crazy,” he recalls. “They had never seen a windmill before.” [x]
In 2014, William Kamkwamba received his 4 year degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student.
(Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts

The power of books

That’s so cool! What a blessing he must be.

nativepeopleproblems: 1017sosa300: ultrafacts: William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was...