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Children, Community, and Family: What do you do for self-care? Psychological health Physical health Self-awareness Spirituality What do you already do for self care? What would you like to do more of? What do you need help with? nal health Emotion lace wellnes Workp SELF-CARE WHEEL Psychological Self-awareness Sensory engagement Regul l care zealthy Exercise Self-reflection Therapy Journal Physical Be sexual. Get enough sleep Take vacations Take time off Massages Acupuncture Aromatherapy Draw Paint Go to symphony or ballet Safe housing Relax in the sun Garden Read a self-help book . Join a Bubblebaths Kiss Ask for nurture support group Think about Take a walk Turn off cell phone your positive qualities Practice asking and Get "me" time LIFE receiving help SELF-CARE WHEEL BALANCE Learn who you are Fige at you Short and Long-term Goals lection community Self-cherish Meditate Sing . Dance Play Be inspired Self-refle Make a Vision Board Foster friendships Go on dates Take yoga Play with children Bathe in the ocean Watch sunsets Find spiritual Get coffee witha friend Get out of debt Just relax Write a poem or a book . Spend time Pray Find spiritual mentor Volunteer for a cause with your family Cook out Learn to play guitar Personal Foster self-forgiveness Spiritual inspired by and adapted from "Self-Care Assessment Worksheet" from Transforming the Pain: A Workbook on Vicarious Traumatization by Saakvitne, Pearlman & Staff This Self-Care Wheel was of TSI/CAAP (Norton, 1996). Created by Olga Phoenix Project: Healing for Social Change (2013) Dedicated to all trauma professionals worldwide. www.OlgaPhoenix.com Emotio tional mations .ice essio gement Affir -love l Self- y "I Love You" ovie Cry Socia gh . Sa Laatch a Flirt l obby. Find a Buy yourself Cuddle with your a present pet Tell yourself 1 are e Forgiveness ic Pract and sick da Take all move Take a class ays vacation Plan your days Learn support of collesTake m Get regular Do not work during next career to say NO sion Get ervi mental Leave work at work undaries Do Set your time off not work overtime Take time for lunch Professiona outforhealth: Take care people. 
Children, Community, and Family: What do you do for self-care?
 Psychological health
 Physical health
 Self-awareness
 Spirituality
 What do you already do for self care?
 What would you like to do more of?
 What do you need help with?
 nal health
 Emotion
 lace wellnes
 Workp

 SELF-CARE
 WHEEL
 Psychological
 Self-awareness Sensory engagement
 Regul l care
 zealthy Exercise
 Self-reflection
 Therapy Journal
 Physical
 Be sexual. Get enough sleep
 Take vacations Take time off
 Massages Acupuncture
 Aromatherapy Draw
 Paint Go to symphony or ballet
 Safe housing
 Relax in the sun Garden
 Read a self-help book . Join a
 Bubblebaths Kiss
 Ask for nurture
 support group Think about
 Take a walk Turn off
 cell phone
 your positive qualities
 Practice asking and
 Get "me" time
 LIFE
 receiving help
 SELF-CARE
 WHEEL
 BALANCE
 Learn who you are
 Fige at you
 Short and Long-term Goals
 lection
 community Self-cherish
 Meditate Sing . Dance
 Play Be inspired
 Self-refle
 Make a Vision Board
 Foster friendships Go on dates
 Take yoga Play with children
 Bathe in the ocean Watch sunsets
 Find spiritual
 Get coffee witha friend
 Get out of debt Just relax
 Write a poem or a book . Spend time
 Pray Find spiritual mentor
 Volunteer for a cause
 with your family Cook out
 Learn to play guitar
 Personal
 Foster self-forgiveness
 Spiritual
 inspired by and adapted from "Self-Care Assessment Worksheet"
 from Transforming the Pain: A Workbook on Vicarious Traumatization by Saakvitne, Pearlman & Staff
 This Self-Care Wheel was
 of TSI/CAAP (Norton, 1996). Created by Olga Phoenix Project: Healing for Social Change (2013)
 Dedicated to all trauma professionals worldwide.
 www.OlgaPhoenix.com
 Emotio
 tional
 mations
 .ice essio
 gement
 Affir
 -love
 l
 Self-
 y "I Love You"
 ovie
 Cry Socia
 gh . Sa
 Laatch a
 Flirt
 l
 obby.
 Find a
 Buy yourself
 Cuddle with
 your
 a present
 pet
 Tell yourself
 1 are
 e
 Forgiveness
 ic
 Pract
 and sick da
 Take all
 move Take a class
 ays
 vacation
 Plan your
 days Learn
 support of collesTake m
 Get regular
 Do not work during
 next career
 to say NO
 sion Get
 ervi
 mental
 Leave
 work at work
 undaries Do
 Set
 your time off
 not work overtime
 Take time for lunch
 Professiona
outforhealth:
Take care people. 

outforhealth: Take care people. 

Doctor, Gif, and Google: Trisha Greenhalgh #FBPE @trishgreenhalgh Doctor: Don't confuse your Google search with my 6y at medical school. Patient: Don't confuse the 1-hour lecture you had on my condition with my 20y of living with it. 5:30 AM May 26, 2018 7.4K Retweets 22.8K Likes val-ritz: dreaming-in-circles: magickinmundane: pr0dr0me: licensetomurse: meanwhileonwednesday: As a medical professional and a medically complicated human this is very important to me That’s not wrong. These are both true Both are very very true. These are both true, but more importantly, not mutually exclusive! Say a patient comes in with chest pain. First time they’ve ever had chest pain. They say they googled it, and clearly they have cancer now! …no. That’s the first example. But say a patient has chest pain, they’ve had chest pain for 10 years, every previous doctor has checked for all the obvious causes, and nothing changes. That’s a completely different scenario. In the first example, the patient doesn’t know what they’re talking about. The condition is new, their knowledge is limited. That’s why we have doctors. But in the second example, the patient is the expert, and the doctor is the one who’s new to the situation. The patient has done all this before, and is very familiar with the pain (condition, etc.) that they have. The doctor is not the one with 10 years of experience. They need to listen, because the patient actually has something they don’t know to add to the conversation. These two things are not mutually exclusive, they are not the same scenario, and both doctors and patients (but mostly doctors) need to learn to tell the difference and know when to talk, and when to listen. This is also *highly* relevant to anti-vaxers. There is a reason that the entire section on dysthymia in my psychology textbooks is basically “this person has been living with this for years longer than you will ever have researched it. help them facilitate their own coping strategies.”
Doctor, Gif, and Google: Trisha Greenhalgh #FBPE
 @trishgreenhalgh
 Doctor: Don't confuse your Google
 search with my 6y at medical school.
 Patient: Don't confuse the 1-hour
 lecture you had on my condition with
 my 20y of living with it.
 5:30 AM May 26, 2018
 7.4K Retweets
 22.8K Likes
val-ritz:

dreaming-in-circles:

magickinmundane:

pr0dr0me:


licensetomurse:


meanwhileonwednesday:
As a medical professional and a medically complicated human this is very important to me
That’s not wrong. 


These are both true


Both are very very true.


These are both true, but more importantly, not mutually exclusive! 
Say a patient comes in with chest pain. First time they’ve ever had chest pain. They say they googled it, and clearly they have cancer now!
…no. That’s the first example. 
But say a patient has chest pain, they’ve had chest pain for 10 years, every previous doctor has checked for all the obvious causes, and nothing changes. 
That’s a completely different scenario. In the first example, the patient doesn’t know what they’re talking about. The condition is new, their knowledge is limited. That’s why we have doctors. But in the second example, the patient is the expert, and the doctor is the one who’s new to the situation. The patient has done all this before, and is very familiar with the pain (condition, etc.) that they have. The doctor is not the one with 10 years of experience. They need to listen, because the patient actually has something they don’t know to add to the conversation. 
These two things are not mutually exclusive, they are not the same scenario, and both doctors and patients (but mostly doctors) need to learn to tell the difference and know when to talk, and when to listen. 
This is also *highly* relevant to anti-vaxers. 

There is a reason that the entire section on dysthymia in my psychology textbooks is basically “this person has been living with this for years longer than you will ever have researched it. help them facilitate their own coping strategies.”

val-ritz: dreaming-in-circles: magickinmundane: pr0dr0me: licensetomurse: meanwhileonwednesday: As a medical professional and a medic...

Children, College, and Parents: SESAME STREET.0 frislander: elfwreck: loreweaver: cameoappearance: derinthemadscientist: cameoappearance: spockglocksrocks: sometimes there’s videos that make me happy to exist on this planet i’d reblog this even if it was a still image I know it’s a sesame street clip but seriously, who is the target audience for this? Parents watching it with their kids, I guess? literally everyone Everyone. No, really… everyone. For adults, the appeal is Sir Patrick Stewart doing a kid’s educational bit in full Shakespearean dress and style; there’s a delightful cognitive dissonance between the very serious presentation and the very simple content. For very small children, it’s educational: this is the letter “B”; here’s how it’s shaped; here’s some words you know that start with it. Oh, and here’s a word you may not be familiar with that starts with it, so you can recognize that it’s the sound that matters, and not whatever other connection you made between the other two words. For older kids: you’ve probably heard that “to be or not to be?” speech, or at least part of it, so you can enjoy some of the parody the adults are watching. Also, here’s how to describe how a letter is made - how to teach young siblings who don’t read yet, how to explain both the shape and the sound. For kids with dyslexia: here’s how you differentiate a “B” from a P or D or E. You may have to go slowly and look carefully at the exact shapes that make up the whole, but there are differences and you can learn to recognize them.  For teens or young college students: In addition to whichever parts of those are relevant to you, here’s what Shakespearean acting sounds like. Here’s how to enunciate clearly and slowly, so your audience can understand terms they may not recognize and still follow the gist of what you’re saying. If you’re reading Shakespeare in school, try sounding it out like this and see if that helps it make sense. For new RenFaire workers: Here’s how to pronounce “zounds.”  One of the most glorious things in the world is Shakespearean actors doing stuff like this.
Children, College, and Parents: SESAME STREET.0
frislander:
elfwreck:

loreweaver:

cameoappearance:

derinthemadscientist:

cameoappearance:

spockglocksrocks:

sometimes there’s videos that make me happy to exist on this planet

i’d reblog this even if it was a still image

I know it’s a sesame street clip but seriously, who is the target audience for this?

Parents watching it with their kids, I guess?

literally everyone

Everyone. No, really… everyone.
For adults, the appeal is Sir Patrick Stewart doing a kid’s educational bit in full Shakespearean dress and style; there’s a delightful cognitive dissonance between the very serious presentation and the very simple content.
For very small children, it’s educational: this is the letter “B”; here’s how it’s shaped; here’s some words you know that start with it. Oh, and here’s a word you may not be familiar with that starts with it, so you can recognize that it’s the sound that matters, and not whatever other connection you made between the other two words.
For older kids: you’ve probably heard that “to be or not to be?” speech, or at least part of it, so you can enjoy some of the parody the adults are watching. Also, here’s how to describe how a letter is made - how to teach young siblings who don’t read yet, how to explain both the shape and the sound.
For kids with dyslexia: here’s how you differentiate a “B” from a P or D or E. You may have to go slowly and look carefully at the exact shapes that make up the whole, but there are differences and you can learn to recognize them. 
For teens or young college students: In addition to whichever parts of those are relevant to you, here’s what Shakespearean acting sounds like. Here’s how to enunciate clearly and slowly, so your audience can understand terms they may not recognize and still follow the gist of what you’re saying. If you’re reading Shakespeare in school, try sounding it out like this and see if that helps it make sense.
For new RenFaire workers: Here’s how to pronounce “zounds.” 

One of the most glorious things in the world is Shakespearean actors doing stuff like this.

frislander: elfwreck: loreweaver: cameoappearance: derinthemadscientist: cameoappearance: spockglocksrocks: sometimes there’s videos t...