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Thered

Thered

His
His

His

Edmunds
Edmunds

Edmunds

A Href
A Href

A Href

Sta
Sta

Sta

Gardy
Gardy

Gardy

Was
Was

Was

Very
Very

Very

I Have
I Have

I Have

I Have A
I Have A

I Have A

🔥 | Latest

Hawkes: funke: phlvl: Excuse me my man is using tony hawk pro skater 2 cheats in real life
Hawkes: funke:

phlvl:
Excuse me
my man is using tony hawk pro skater 2 cheats in real life

funke: phlvl: Excuse me my man is using tony hawk pro skater 2 cheats in real life

Hawkes: ectobiology-department: waggly-hawk: earthstory: evergladesholidaypark@gabbynikolleis getting those hard to reach spots for Seven. I love him! brush the boy!!!!!!!!
Hawkes: ectobiology-department:

waggly-hawk:

earthstory:


evergladesholidaypark@gabbynikolleis getting those hard to reach spots for Seven.


I love him!


brush the boy!!!!!!!!

ectobiology-department: waggly-hawk: earthstory: evergladesholidaypark@gabbynikolleis getting those hard to reach spots for Seven....

Hawkes: WHIO-TV @whioty Do you know what to do if you're bitten by a tarantula hawk wasp? on.whio.com/2tjwp8x 7/3/17, 3:13 PM moonsofavalon: prokopetz: thesallowbeldam: momma-crow: 1petulantkitten: 1petulantkitten: artistil: weavemama: BY A WHAT THATS ALL THE BIG SCARIES IN ONE BUG TFFFJU Give it a dime, apparently. Had to go research this thing, and the answer to what to do if it stings you is scream. from Wikipedia- “One researcher described the pain as “…immediate, excruciating, unrelenting pain that simply shuts down one’s ability to do anything, except scream. Mental discipline simply does not work in these situations. In terms of scale, the wasp’s sting is rated near the top of the Schmidt sting pain index, second only to that of the bullet ant, and is described by Schmidt as “blinding, fierce [and] shockingly electric”.“ Soooooo…dissociate to escape or? It’s laying eggs in you. Let’s back up a second and fully appreciate that description. The Schmidt sting pain index, a widely used classification system for the bites and stings of ants, bees and wasps, is literally the personal ranking system of a guy named Justin Schmidt, who goes around letting bugs sting him for science. Like, that’s this Thing as a scientist. In one entry, he describes the sting of the common bee as “almost pleasant, [like] a lover just bit your earlobe a little too hard.” In another, the sting of the yellowjacket is described as “hot and smoky, almost irreverent. Imagine W. C. Fields extinguishing a cigar on your tongue.“ So when the Schmidt sting pain index characterises the sting of the tarantula hawk as “blinding, fierce [and] shockingly electric”, well, now you know what your standard for comparison is! this is fascinating but when do we kinkshame Justin Schmidt
Hawkes: WHIO-TV
 @whioty
 Do you know what to do if you're
 bitten by a tarantula hawk wasp?
 on.whio.com/2tjwp8x
 7/3/17, 3:13 PM
moonsofavalon:
prokopetz:


thesallowbeldam:

momma-crow:

1petulantkitten:


1petulantkitten:


artistil:

weavemama:

BY A WHAT

THATS ALL THE BIG SCARIES IN ONE BUG TFFFJU

Give it a dime, apparently.


Had to go research this thing, and the answer to what to do if it stings you is scream. 
from Wikipedia- 
“One researcher described the pain as “…immediate, excruciating, unrelenting pain that simply shuts down one’s ability to do anything, except scream. Mental discipline simply does not work in these situations. In terms of scale, the wasp’s sting is rated near the top of the Schmidt sting pain index, second only to that of the bullet ant, and is described by Schmidt as “blinding, fierce [and] shockingly electric”.“


Soooooo…dissociate to escape or?

It’s laying eggs in you.

Let’s back up a second and fully appreciate that description.
The Schmidt sting pain index, a widely used classification system for the bites and stings of ants, bees and wasps, is literally the personal ranking system of a guy named Justin Schmidt, who goes around letting bugs sting him for science. Like, that’s this Thing as a scientist.
In one entry, he describes the sting of the common bee as “almost pleasant, [like] a lover just bit your earlobe a little too hard.”
In another, the sting of the yellowjacket is described as “hot and smoky, almost irreverent. Imagine W. C. Fields extinguishing a cigar on your tongue.“
So when the Schmidt sting pain index characterises the sting of the tarantula hawk as “blinding, fierce [and] shockingly electric”, well, now you know what your standard for comparison is!


this is fascinating but when do we kinkshame Justin Schmidt

moonsofavalon: prokopetz: thesallowbeldam: momma-crow: 1petulantkitten: 1petulantkitten: artistil: weavemama: BY A WHAT THATS...

Hawkes: this guy looks exactly like a Tony Hawk character
Hawkes: this guy looks exactly like a Tony Hawk character

this guy looks exactly like a Tony Hawk character

Hawkes: srsfunny: Not Today, Hawk
Hawkes: srsfunny:

Not Today, Hawk

srsfunny: Not Today, Hawk

Hawkes: penfairy I visited the museum and I heard two bros in the dinosaur exhibit having an earnest discussion about the best way to kill a T-Rex with a sword and what kind of armour should be worn into the battle and they spoke with such passion I really wish the scientific community could have heard them. I'd love to know how palaeontologists would weigh in on The Great Debate penfairy For instance, was the bro in the weed shorts right? is it pointless to wear heavy armour when battling a T-Rex? Is it truly better to go into battle naked wielding dual swords? Or was the bro in the backwards cap correct? Should you go for a double-handed sword and iron armour? Will light bouncing off the armour really confuse and blind the beast? Realistically, what protection is armour against a dinosaur? Was Weed Shorts right when he proposed to use his superior agility to slash its tendons and stab the eyes when he brought it down? Or was Backwards Cap right when he said charge and slash open its sot belly?? What is the truth??17? excessively-english-little-b Hello, palaeontologist-in-training herel Thought I'd have a litte think into this because hey, who wants to do coursework on trilobites when you could be considering T, rex instead? Light and maneuverable is probably best when facing a rex. It's big and t's powerful but it's not going to making any quick sharp tums any time soon. According to our current estimates, a T rex would be able to crush a small car with its jaws, so realistically, no amount of armour is gonna protect you if it grabs you If the T. rex manages to grab you you re dead regardless. It could probably eat you within a couple of bites if it was trying Figures 1 & 2: Theoretical T. rex bite-force model fucking up a mini. Thank you, Bill Oddie and BBC's The Truth About Killer Dinosaurs. As far as armour goes, lighter is better, and at the end of the day isn't going to mean shit anyway. T rex can't slash at you with claws, so it's bite or bust, and if it bites YOU'RE bust So, lets say a point to Weed Shorts. Why NOT fight a T rex butt naked with swords T rex had good binocular vision. Dont believe Jurassic Park's lies-T rex was a hunter and could probably see you brilliantly whether you moved or not. " .That said, a T rex's eyesight will work about the same as modem birds of prey. Think hawk, or eagle. I reckon light bouncing off anything would be a fairly minor hindrance, or at least, wouldn't affect it any more than any other hunting bird. So, using light to blind and confuse the rex? May potentially work but might be hard and wouldn't do much for long. Don't rely on this for strategy τ rex actually had gastralia, sometimes called 'belly-ribs. protected and supported the internal organs. There would also be some seriously thick abdominal muscles to get through. Unless you're planning to do some precision stabbing with a very long sword, chances are you're not gonna be killing a rex by slicing open it's stomach. Also, being under its stomach is gonna put you in-reach of the Jaws of Death. These " I'm not sure how easy it would be, or how well it would work, to try and cut a T rex's tendons. Theoretically, sounds like it should work. However you're gonna need a lot of strength to get through them, probably I'd personally cut the throat rather than stab through the eyes once the rex is down, but that's probably personal preference. Once you've felled it, it's dead either wayl A T. rex unable to hunt is a dead T rex . Gastralia Figure 3: The gastralia of a T. rex. Bless u Scott Hartman for your skeletal As far as attack goes, the belly is not as weak a s pot as it seems. So, point to Weed Shorts on his execution plan. Sounds pretty solid. Overall, I'd say that Weed Shorts had the best plan to defeat the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex. If you ever see him again, congratulate him on his solid plan of attack My favorite thing about paleontologists (and any scientist really, but paleontologists in particular) is that you can ask them COMPLETELY BATSHIT INSANE questions and by God, they will give you a completely Serious answer Source penfairy move it #trex #dinosaurs #go for the throat is how wolverine did it #science side of tumblr So you need to sword fight a T. rex
Hawkes: penfairy
 I visited the museum and I heard two bros in the dinosaur exhibit having an
 earnest discussion about the best way to kill a T-Rex with a sword and what kind
 of armour should be worn into the battle and they spoke with such passion I
 really wish the scientific community could have heard them. I'd love to know how
 palaeontologists would weigh in on The Great Debate
 penfairy
 For instance, was the bro in the weed shorts right? is it pointless to wear heavy
 armour when battling a T-Rex? Is it truly better to go into battle naked wielding
 dual swords? Or was the bro in the backwards cap correct? Should you go for a
 double-handed sword and iron armour? Will light bouncing off the armour really
 confuse and blind the beast? Realistically, what protection is armour against a
 dinosaur? Was Weed Shorts right when he proposed to use his superior agility
 to slash its tendons and stab the eyes when he brought it down? Or was
 Backwards Cap right when he said charge and slash open its sot belly?? What
 is the truth??17?
 excessively-english-little-b
 Hello, palaeontologist-in-training herel Thought I'd have a litte think into this
 because hey, who wants to do coursework on trilobites when you could be
 considering T, rex instead?
 Light and maneuverable is probably best when facing a rex. It's big and
 t's powerful but it's not going to making any quick sharp tums any time
 soon.
 According to our current estimates, a T rex would be able to crush a small
 car with its jaws, so realistically, no amount of armour is gonna protect you
 if it grabs you
 If the T. rex manages to grab you you re dead regardless. It could
 probably eat you within a couple of bites if it was trying
 Figures 1 & 2: Theoretical T. rex bite-force model fucking up a mini. Thank you,
 Bill Oddie and BBC's The Truth About Killer Dinosaurs.
 As far as armour goes, lighter is better, and at the end of the day isn't going to
 mean shit anyway. T rex can't slash at you with claws, so it's bite or bust, and if
 it bites YOU'RE bust So, lets say a point to Weed Shorts. Why NOT fight a T
 rex butt naked with swords
 T rex had good binocular vision. Dont believe Jurassic Park's lies-T
 rex was a hunter and could probably see you brilliantly whether you
 moved or not.
 "
 .That said, a T rex's eyesight will work about the same as modem birds of
 prey. Think hawk, or eagle. I reckon light bouncing off anything would be a
 fairly minor hindrance, or at least, wouldn't affect it any more than any
 other hunting bird.
 So, using light to blind and confuse the rex? May potentially work but might be
 hard and wouldn't do much for long. Don't rely on this for strategy
 τ rex actually had gastralia, sometimes called 'belly-ribs.
 protected and supported the internal organs. There would also be some
 seriously thick abdominal muscles to get through.
 Unless you're planning to do some precision stabbing with a very long
 sword, chances are you're not gonna be killing a rex by slicing open it's
 stomach. Also, being under its stomach is gonna put you in-reach of the
 Jaws of Death.
 These
 "
 I'm not sure how easy it would be, or how well it would work, to try and cut
 a T rex's tendons. Theoretically, sounds like it should work. However
 you're gonna need a lot of strength to get through them, probably
 I'd personally cut the throat rather than stab through the eyes once the rex
 is down, but that's probably personal preference. Once you've felled it, it's
 dead either wayl A T. rex unable to hunt is a dead T rex
 .
 Gastralia
 Figure 3: The gastralia of a T. rex. Bless u Scott Hartman for your skeletal
 As far as attack
 goes, the belly is not as weak a s
 pot as it seems. So, point to
 Weed Shorts on his execution plan. Sounds pretty solid.
 Overall, I'd say that Weed Shorts had the best plan to defeat the mighty
 Tyrannosaurus rex. If you ever see him again, congratulate him on his solid plan
 of attack
 My favorite thing about paleontologists (and any scientist really, but
 paleontologists in particular) is that you can ask them COMPLETELY BATSHIT
 INSANE questions and by God, they will give you a completely Serious answer
 Source penfairy move it #trex #dinosaurs
 #go for the throat is how wolverine did it
 #science side of tumblr
So you need to sword fight a T. rex

So you need to sword fight a T. rex

Hawkes: osberend: iopele: suspendnodisbelief: naamahdarling: optimysticals: youwantmuchmore: thebestoftumbling: golden eagle having a relaxing time This is the world’s largest flying Engine of Murder marveling at the fact that it can actually have its tummy rubbed. I feel like this is the next step up on “loose your fingers” roulette from petting a kittie’s tummy, but just below belly rubs for say a lion. Can someone who knows birds better than I do tell me whether this eagle is as happy as it looks?  Because I want it to be happy.  It looks so happy.  Bewildered by having a friend, but so happy. Just popping on this thread to confirm: yes, the eagle is happy about the belly rubs. Golden eagles make this sound when receiving allopreening and similar affectionate and soothing treatment from their parents and mates. It’s the “I am safe and well fed, and somebody familiar is taking good care of me” sound. Angry raptors and wounded raptors make some pretty dramatic hisses and shrieks; frightened raptors go dead silent and try to hide if they can, or fluff up big and get loud and in-your-face if hiding isn’t an option. They can easily sever a finger or break the bones of a human hand or wrist, and even with a very thick leather falconer’s gauntlet, I’ve known falconers to leave a mews (hawk house) with graphic punctures THROUGH the gauntlet into the meat of their hands and arms, just from buteos and kestrels way smaller than this eagle. A pissed off hawk will make damn sure you don’t try twice whatever you pulled that pissed her off, even if she’s been human-imprinted. If you’re ever unsure about an animal’s level of okayness with something that’s happening, there are three spot-check questions you can ask, to common-sense your way through it: 1. Is the animal capable of defending itself or making a threatening or fearful display, or otherwise giving protest, and if so, is it using this ability? (e.g. dog snarling or biting, swan hissing, horse kicking or biting) 2. Does the animal experience an incentive-based relationship with the human? (i.e. does the animal have a reason, in the animal’s frame of reference, for being near this human? e.g. dog sharing companionship / food / shelter, hawk receiving good quality abundant food and shelter and medical care from a falconer) 3. Is the animal a domesticated species, with at least a full century of consistent species cohabitation with humans? (Domesticated animals frequently are conditioned from birth or by selective breeding to be unbothered by human actions that upset their feral nearest relatives.) In this situation, YES the eagle can self-defend, YES the eagle has incentive to cooperate with and trust the human handler, and NO the eagle is not a domesticated species, meaning we can expect a high level of reactivity to distress, compared to domestic animals: if the eagle was distressed, it would be pretty visible and apparent to the viewer. These aren’t a universally applicable metric, but they’re a good start for mammal and bird interactions. Pair that with the knowledge that eagles reserve those chirps for calm environments, and you can be pretty secure and comfy in the knowledge that the big honkin’ birb is happy and cozy. Also, to anybody wondering, falconers are almost single-handedly responsible for the recovery from near-extinction of several raptor species, including and especially peregrine falcons. Most hawks only live with the falconer for a year, and most of that year is spent getting the bird in ideal condition for survival and success as a wild breeding adult. Falconers are extensively trained and dedicated wildlife conservationists, pretty much by definition, especially in the continental USA, and they make up an unspeakably important part of the overall conservation of predatory bird species. Predatory birds are an important part of every ecosystem they inhabit. Just like apiarists and their bees, the relationship between falconer and hawk is one of great benefit to the animal and the ecosystem, in exchange for a huge amount of time, effort, expense, and education on the part of the human, for very little personal benefit to that one human. It’s definitely not exploitation of the bird, and most hawks working with falconers are hawks who absolutely would not have reached adulthood without human help: the sick, the injured, and the “runts” of the nest who don’t receive adequate resources from their own parents. These are, by and large, wonderful people who are in love with the natural world and putting a lifetime of knowledge and sheer exhausting work into conserving it and its winged wonders. reblogged for excellent info, I’m so glad that big gorgeous birb really is as happy as it looks! Today’s bit of positive activism: A reminder that, although the world may contain many bad and awful things, it also contains an enormous winged predator clucking happily as a human gives it a belly rub.
Hawkes: osberend:
iopele:

suspendnodisbelief:

naamahdarling:

optimysticals:

youwantmuchmore:

thebestoftumbling:



golden eagle having a relaxing time



This is the world’s largest flying Engine of Murder marveling at the fact that it can actually have its tummy rubbed.

I feel like this is the next step up on “loose your fingers” roulette from petting a kittie’s tummy, but just below belly rubs for say a lion.

Can someone who knows birds better than I do tell me whether this eagle is as happy as it looks?  Because I want it to be happy.  It looks so happy.  Bewildered by having a friend, but so happy.

Just popping on this thread to confirm: yes, the eagle is happy about the belly rubs. Golden eagles make this sound when receiving allopreening and similar affectionate and soothing treatment from their parents and mates. It’s the “I am safe and well fed, and somebody familiar is taking good care of me” sound. Angry raptors and wounded raptors make some pretty dramatic hisses and shrieks; frightened raptors go dead silent and try to hide if they can, or fluff up big and get loud and in-your-face if hiding isn’t an option. They can easily sever a finger or break the bones of a human hand or wrist, and even with a very thick leather falconer’s gauntlet, I’ve known falconers to leave a mews (hawk house) with graphic punctures THROUGH the gauntlet into the meat of their hands and arms, just from buteos and kestrels way smaller than this eagle. A pissed off hawk will make damn sure you don’t try twice whatever you pulled that pissed her off, even if she’s been human-imprinted.
If you’re ever unsure about an animal’s level of okayness with something that’s happening, there are three spot-check questions you can ask, to common-sense your way through it:
1. Is the animal capable of defending itself or making a threatening or fearful display, or otherwise giving protest, and if so, is it using this ability? (e.g. dog snarling or biting, swan hissing, horse kicking or biting) 2. Does the animal experience an incentive-based relationship with the human? (i.e. does the animal have a reason, in the animal’s frame of reference, for being near this human? e.g. dog sharing companionship / food / shelter, hawk receiving good quality abundant food and shelter and medical care from a falconer)
3. Is the animal a domesticated species, with at least a full century of consistent species cohabitation with humans? (Domesticated animals frequently are conditioned from birth or by selective breeding to be unbothered by human actions that upset their feral nearest relatives.)
In this situation, YES the eagle can self-defend, YES the eagle has incentive to cooperate with and trust the human handler, and NO the eagle is not a domesticated species, meaning we can expect a high level of reactivity to distress, compared to domestic animals: if the eagle was distressed, it would be pretty visible and apparent to the viewer. These aren’t a universally applicable metric, but they’re a good start for mammal and bird interactions.
Pair that with the knowledge that eagles reserve those chirps for calm environments, and you can be pretty secure and comfy in the knowledge that the big honkin’ birb is happy and cozy.
Also, to anybody wondering, falconers are almost single-handedly responsible for the recovery from near-extinction of several raptor species, including and especially peregrine falcons. Most hawks only live with the falconer for a year, and most of that year is spent getting the bird in ideal condition for survival and success as a wild breeding adult. Falconers are extensively trained and dedicated wildlife conservationists, pretty much by definition, especially in the continental USA, and they make up an unspeakably important part of the overall conservation of predatory bird species. Predatory birds are an important part of every ecosystem they inhabit. Just like apiarists and their bees, the relationship between falconer and hawk is one of great benefit to the animal and the ecosystem, in exchange for a huge amount of time, effort, expense, and education on the part of the human, for very little personal benefit to that one human. It’s definitely not exploitation of the bird, and most hawks working with falconers are hawks who absolutely would not have reached adulthood without human help: the sick, the injured, and the “runts” of the nest who don’t receive adequate resources from their own parents. These are, by and large, wonderful people who are in love with the natural world and putting a lifetime of knowledge and sheer exhausting work into conserving it and its winged wonders.

reblogged for excellent info, I’m so glad that big gorgeous birb really is as happy as it looks!

Today’s bit of positive activism: A reminder that, although the world may contain many bad and awful things, it also contains an enormous winged predator clucking happily as a human gives it a belly rub.

osberend: iopele: suspendnodisbelief: naamahdarling: optimysticals: youwantmuchmore: thebestoftumbling: golden eagle having a rel...

Hawkes: Fun animal facts I have learned being a zoo cdocent lavendersucculents fuckyeahshezza madlori 1. There are several ways to classify the large cats, one of the more useful ones is into the roaring cats (tigers, lions) and the purring cats (bobcats lynxes). The puma (also known as the mountain lion) is the largest cat that purrs. I've heard it up close, it's amazing. A cheetah's purr sounds like an idling motorcycle engine 2. Kangaroos cannot move their legs independently of each other, they have to move them in sync - when they're on land. When they're swimming, they can move them separately. Hopping is their most efficient way to move - a walking kangaroo is awkward as hell. They swing both legs forward using their tail as a third leg to prop up while their legs swing 3. People often think that flamingoes' knees bend the wrong way. They don't the joint you're seeing in the middle of their leg isn't their knee, it's their ankle. Their knee is up by their body, and it bends the same way ours does 4. Giraffes only sleep 1-2 hours a day 5. Bald eagles' vocalizations are not what you expect. When you see a flying bald eagle in the movies and hear that majestic caw sound? That isn't an eagle, it's been dubbed over with another bird, usually a red-tailed hawk. Bald eagles actually sound...not majestic. Kind of like if a kitten could be a bird 6. Elephants are one of only a handful of animals that can pass the mirror test - in other words, they can recognize their own reflection (and not think t's another animal, as dogs and cats usually do). They tested this by placing a chalk mark on an elephant's forehead and then showing it a mirror. The elephant investigated the mark on its own forehead, indicating it knew that it was looking at itself. The only animals that pass this test are the higher primates, the higher cetaceans (orcas, dolphines), elephants, and weirdly magpies 7. One-fifth of all the known mammal species are bats 8. A kangaroo mother can have three joeys simultaneously at different stages of development: an embryo in her womb (kangaroos can do what's called embryonic diapause which means sort of putting the development on pause until she's ready for it to develop further), a joey in her pouch attached to one nipple, and a joey out of the pouch on the ground who nurses from the other one. The amazing thing? Each of her nipples make different formulations of milk for each joey's different nutritional needs 9. Bonobos, our closest genetic relative (they are more closely related to us than they are to either chimps or gorillas) are almost entirely non- aggressive, matriarchal, and use sex to solve all their problems. They engage in both same and opposite sex interactions, non-penetrative sex (oral, rubbing, manual) and with any age. That's an interesting area to work in, lemme tell you 10. Tortoises have super loud sex. Like, really loud 11. All grizzlies are brown bears, but not all brown bears are grizzlies (grizzlies are a sub-categorization of the brown bear) 12. Reindeer are the only deer species where both males and females grow antlers. The males shed theirs the beginning of December, the females shed theirs in the spring. So all of Santa's reindeer are girls, heh. I love telling little kids that 13. If a rhinoceros knocks off its horn, it grows back faster than you'd expect. One of ours, Rosie, has knocked hers off twice 14. Gorillas get crushes on each other. And on the humans that take care of them. Male gorillas also masturbate. I don't know if the females do, I've never seen it. Sometimes it's like a soap opera up in there 15. Langur monkeys are silvery-gray in color-their babies are bright orange Like Cheeto orange, I do not exaggerate 16. Polar bear fur is not white, it's transparent, like fiber optics. Also, thei skin is black This is all excellent and awesome and am a happier, better person for this knowledge Also, you go badass lady reindeer. Sleigh This was really cool to read actually Tortoises are loud in bed and other fun animal facts
Hawkes: Fun animal facts I have learned being a zoo cdocent
 lavendersucculents
 fuckyeahshezza
 madlori
 1. There are several ways to classify the large cats, one of the more useful
 ones is into the roaring cats (tigers, lions) and the purring cats (bobcats
 lynxes). The puma (also known as the mountain lion) is the largest cat that
 purrs. I've heard it up close, it's amazing. A cheetah's purr sounds like an
 idling motorcycle engine
 2. Kangaroos cannot move their legs independently of each other, they have
 to move them in sync - when they're on land. When they're swimming, they
 can move them separately. Hopping is their most efficient way to move - a
 walking kangaroo is awkward as hell. They swing both legs forward using
 their tail as a third leg to prop up while their legs swing
 3. People often think that flamingoes' knees bend the wrong way. They don't
 the joint you're seeing in the middle of their leg isn't their knee, it's their
 ankle. Their knee is up by their body, and it bends the same way ours does
 4. Giraffes only sleep 1-2 hours a day
 5. Bald eagles' vocalizations are not what you expect. When you see a flying
 bald eagle in the movies and hear that majestic caw sound? That isn't an
 eagle, it's been dubbed over with another bird, usually a red-tailed hawk.
 Bald eagles actually sound...not majestic. Kind of like if a kitten could be a
 bird
 6. Elephants are one of only a handful of animals that can pass the mirror
 test - in other words, they can recognize their own reflection (and not think
 t's another animal, as dogs and cats usually do). They tested this by placing
 a chalk mark on an elephant's forehead and then showing it a mirror. The
 elephant investigated the mark on its own forehead, indicating it knew that it
 was looking at itself. The only animals that pass this test are the higher
 primates, the higher cetaceans (orcas, dolphines), elephants, and weirdly
 magpies
 7. One-fifth of all the known mammal species are bats
 8. A kangaroo mother can have three joeys simultaneously at different
 stages of development: an embryo in her womb (kangaroos can do what's
 called embryonic diapause which means sort of putting the development on
 pause until she's ready for it to develop further), a joey in her pouch
 attached to one nipple, and a joey out of the pouch on the ground who
 nurses from the other one. The amazing thing? Each of her nipples make
 different formulations of milk for each joey's different nutritional needs
 9. Bonobos, our closest genetic relative (they are more closely related to us
 than they are to either chimps or gorillas) are almost entirely non-
 aggressive, matriarchal, and use sex to solve all their problems. They
 engage in both same and opposite sex interactions, non-penetrative sex
 (oral, rubbing, manual) and with any age. That's an interesting area to work
 in, lemme tell you
 10. Tortoises have super loud sex. Like, really loud
 11. All grizzlies are brown bears, but not all brown bears are grizzlies
 (grizzlies are a sub-categorization of the brown bear)
 12. Reindeer are the only deer species where both males and females grow
 antlers. The males shed theirs the beginning of December, the females shed
 theirs in the spring. So all of Santa's reindeer are girls, heh. I love telling little
 kids that
 13. If a rhinoceros knocks off its horn, it grows back faster than you'd expect.
 One of ours, Rosie, has knocked hers off twice
 14. Gorillas get crushes on each other. And on the humans that take care of
 them. Male gorillas also masturbate. I don't know if the females do, I've
 never seen it. Sometimes it's like a soap opera up in there
 15. Langur monkeys are silvery-gray in color-their babies are bright orange
 Like Cheeto orange, I do not exaggerate
 16. Polar bear fur is not white, it's transparent, like fiber optics. Also, thei
 skin is black
 This is all excellent and awesome and am a happier, better person for this
 knowledge
 Also, you go badass lady reindeer. Sleigh
 This was really cool to read actually
Tortoises are loud in bed and other fun animal facts

Tortoises are loud in bed and other fun animal facts

Hawkes: iamnotjody: dope-kulture: Tony Hawk lands a 900 at age 48! 🐐🐐🐐 G.O.A.T
Hawkes: iamnotjody:

dope-kulture:

Tony Hawk lands a 900 at age 48!

🐐🐐🐐

G.O.A.T

iamnotjody: dope-kulture: Tony Hawk lands a 900 at age 48! 🐐🐐🐐 G.O.A.T