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Grown: It’s enough to make a grown man cry
Grown: It’s enough to make a grown man cry

It’s enough to make a grown man cry

Grown: atlinmerrick: dancinggrimm: truckyousasha: thekaraokeninja: fandomsandfeminism: generalmaluga: albinwonderland: fandomsandfeminism: betterthanabortion: “My body, my choice” only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake. Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to. See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon.  Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy.  To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died.  You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies.  reblogging for commentary  But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too.  First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation.  And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument. Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all. If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other.  When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting. When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.”  And that is gross.  ^ THIS. This is this this THIS THIS THIS. THIS!!!!! This is probably the strongest and well worded/supported argument for abortion that I have ever read. WHY THE FUCK HAS TUMBLR FLAGGED THIS?! i’M FUCKING FURIOUS!!! Yep, this was flagged for me too. Which is why I’m going to reblog it several time until Tumblr implodes.
Grown: atlinmerrick:
dancinggrimm:

truckyousasha:

thekaraokeninja:

fandomsandfeminism:

generalmaluga:

albinwonderland:

fandomsandfeminism:

betterthanabortion:

“My body, my choice” only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.

Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.
See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 
Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 
To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 
You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 

reblogging for commentary 

But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 

First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 
And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.
Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.
If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 
When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.
When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 
And that is gross. 

^ THIS. This is this this THIS THIS THIS. THIS!!!!!

This is probably the strongest and well worded/supported argument for abortion that I have ever read.

WHY THE FUCK HAS TUMBLR FLAGGED THIS?! i’M FUCKING FURIOUS!!!

Yep, this was flagged for me too. Which is why I’m going to reblog it several time until Tumblr implodes.

atlinmerrick: dancinggrimm: truckyousasha: thekaraokeninja: fandomsandfeminism: generalmaluga: albinwonderland: fandomsandfeminism:...

Grown: “It’s Enough to Make a Grown Man Cry”
Grown: “It’s Enough to Make a Grown Man Cry”

“It’s Enough to Make a Grown Man Cry”

Grown: It’s enough to make a grown man cry
Grown: It’s enough to make a grown man cry

It’s enough to make a grown man cry

Grown: also grown up me when my partner tries this…
Grown: also grown up me when my partner tries this…

also grown up me when my partner tries this…

Grown: also grown up me when my partner tries this…
Grown: also grown up me when my partner tries this…

also grown up me when my partner tries this…

Grown: Yes, it is enough for a grown man to cry
Grown: Yes, it is enough for a grown man to cry

Yes, it is enough for a grown man to cry

Grown: Yes, it is enough for a grown man to cry
Grown: Yes, it is enough for a grown man to cry

Yes, it is enough for a grown man to cry

Grown: Mr. Rogers used a set of 9 simple rules when talking to children. He did this to be more inclusive and avoid confusion because he knew children would often hear things literally. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com ultrafacts: 1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​ 2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe. 3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.” 4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play. 5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play. 6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. 7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them. 8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them. 9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing. Source: [x] Click HERE for more facts
Grown: Mr. Rogers used a set of 9 simple rules
 when talking to children. He did this to be
 more inclusive and avoid confusion
 because he knew children would often
 hear things literally.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com
ultrafacts:
1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​
2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
Source: [x]
Click HERE for more facts

ultrafacts: 1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dang...

Grown: C humansofnewyork: “Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check to check.  At the time we were staying in the projects with my mother-in-law, but my kids were growing up, so we needed our own place.  But all the rental brokers wanted to see our bank statements.  And we had no savings.  We didn’t even have accounts.  Then one day I was walking down the avenue, and I saw a super fixing up an empty apartment.  I told him I needed to speak to the landlord directly.  No brokers.  And I guess he liked my vibe, because he gave me the name: Ronald Petrowski.  When I called Mr. Petrowski, I explained everything.  I told him we needed a chance.  He agreed to meet me and my husband at Lenny’s Pizzeria.  He bought us a plain pie and listened to our story.  He’d grown up poor himself, so he knew the struggle.  And he gave us a chance.  We’ve been in that apartment for 35 years now, and I’ve paid him every cent.  We’ve fallen on hard times.  At one point I owed him an entire year of rent.  But he was so gracious.  He never sent us an eviction notice.  Every time he came to collect, he’d sit at our kitchen table, have a cup of coffee, and listen to our situation.  Mr. Petrowski is my hero.  He sold the building a couple years ago, but we still keep in touch.  That man gave me a home to raise my children.”
Grown: C
humansofnewyork:

“Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check to check.  At the time we were staying in the projects with my mother-in-law, but my kids were growing up, so we needed our own place.  But all the rental brokers wanted to see our bank statements.  And we had no savings.  We didn’t even have accounts.  Then one day I was walking down the avenue, and I saw a super fixing up an empty apartment.  I told him I needed to speak to the landlord directly.  No brokers.  And I guess he liked my vibe, because he gave me the name: Ronald Petrowski.  When I called Mr. Petrowski, I explained everything.  I told him we needed a chance.  He agreed to meet me and my husband at Lenny’s Pizzeria.  He bought us a plain pie and listened to our story.  He’d grown up poor himself, so he knew the struggle.  And he gave us a chance.  We’ve been in that apartment for 35 years now, and I’ve paid him every cent.  We’ve fallen on hard times.  At one point I owed him an entire year of rent.  But he was so gracious.  He never sent us an eviction notice.  Every time he came to collect, he’d sit at our kitchen table, have a cup of coffee, and listen to our situation.  Mr. Petrowski is my hero.  He sold the building a couple years ago, but we still keep in touch.  That man gave me a home to raise my children.”

humansofnewyork: “Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living ch...