Sudas
Sudas

Sudas

Sociedad
Sociedad

Sociedad

That
That

That

We All Have That One Friend
We All Have That One Friend

We All Have That One Friend

Speech
Speech

Speech

That One Friend
That One Friend

That One Friend

walk
 walk

walk

gobi
gobi

gobi

Mongolia
Mongolia

Mongolia

Book
Book

Book

🔥 | Latest

Gobie: foone Follow oone Here's the question I always have with universal translators in sci-fi: how do they know when to stop translation? Like say an alien asks about deserts on earth, and the human lists "the sahara desert, gobi desert and kalahari desert" Alien: You just said "desert" six times. :43 AM-19 Jul 2018 756 Retweets 1,883 Likes 068 ロ756 ㅇ1.SK foone @Foone 24h ("Sahara" is Arabic for "desert". "Gobi is Mongolian for "desert, and "Kalahari is Tswana for "desert foone @Foone 24h Man, the aliens are going to think we're so bad at naming. Cause really, aren't Brit: Behold, the beautiful River Avon Alien: Ahh, the River River. You humans have such a knack for naming things. foone Foone 24h Here we are in Chad, looking upon the mighty Lake Chad! Ahh yes, the land of Lake, bordering the Lake Lake. Another fine human name." foone @Foone 24h And here's Nyanza Lac, in Burundi. As you can tell by the fact that it's named Lake Lake in Bantu & French, it's a la... actually this one's a city. A city named Lake Lake strange-emily I found this thing on Facebook... and l fell down the Humans Are Weird hole yet again. ( first did before I even started my blog - Pinterest is sooo full of these posts! And I keep falling down it from time to time, when I discover something new) sirthane You could do it like Douglas Adams with some device that reads brainwaves (or whatever jargon you choose) and translates the intended meaning of the words according to the speaker. In this context, for instance, the speaker intends the word Sahara to mean the name of the place, so the translator would translate it accurately as Sahara Desert. I've thought about things like this before. Mostly about the common rip at ghost hunter shows and movies about how a x00 years old German castle has ghosts that speak perfect, crystal clear, modern English. My thoughts on a plausible explanation were that an apparition would not physically speak by causing vibrations in the air. Rather, consider the possibility that they instead push thoughts into the minds of those it interacts with causing them to experience the sensation of hearing and seeing them as a means to communicate Your brain receives thoughts of the meanings and concepts the being intends to convey. That's why you hear them in your native language, no matter what you speak or where you're at. This also comes with the bonus of explaining why proof is never found on audio or video recordings. The sights and sounds you perceive didn't actually physically happen. You could also reasonably argue that they'd still be able to interact with (push) physical objects with strong enough emotions through some means (depending on canon) while communicating in this manner by saying that expanding and contracting the air in such a way to create the sound of voice with intelligible words would require far too much precision and control ldk. It's fun stuff to think about. Source:strange-emily #brain waves #translation #ghost echnology #humans are space australians #humans are insane #humans are space oddities #humans are space orcs #humans are weird #humans 16,100 notes A neat solution to a worldbuilding problem
Gobie: foone
 Follow
 oone
 Here's the question I always have with
 universal translators in sci-fi: how do
 they know when to stop translation?
 Like say an alien asks about deserts on
 earth, and the human lists "the sahara
 desert, gobi desert and kalahari desert"
 Alien: You just said "desert" six times.
 :43 AM-19 Jul 2018
 756 Retweets 1,883 Likes
 068 ロ756 ㅇ1.SK
 foone @Foone 24h
 ("Sahara" is Arabic for "desert". "Gobi is Mongolian for "desert, and "Kalahari is
 Tswana for "desert
 foone @Foone 24h
 Man, the aliens are going to think we're so bad at naming. Cause really, aren't
 Brit: Behold, the beautiful River Avon
 Alien: Ahh, the River River. You humans have such a knack for naming things.
 foone Foone 24h
 Here we are in Chad, looking upon the mighty Lake Chad!
 Ahh yes, the land of Lake, bordering the Lake Lake. Another fine human name."
 foone @Foone 24h
 And here's Nyanza Lac, in Burundi. As you can tell by the fact that it's named
 Lake Lake in Bantu & French, it's a la... actually this one's a city. A city named Lake
 Lake
 strange-emily
 I found this thing on Facebook... and l fell down the Humans Are Weird hole yet
 again. ( first did before I even started my blog - Pinterest is sooo full of these
 posts! And I keep falling down it from time to time, when I discover something
 new)
 sirthane
 You could do it like Douglas Adams with some device that reads brainwaves (or
 whatever jargon you choose) and translates the intended meaning of the words
 according to the speaker. In this context, for instance, the speaker intends the
 word Sahara to mean the name of the place, so the translator would translate it
 accurately as Sahara Desert.
 I've thought about things like this before. Mostly about the common rip at ghost
 hunter shows and movies about how a x00 years old German castle has ghosts
 that speak perfect, crystal clear, modern English. My thoughts on a plausible
 explanation were that an apparition would not physically speak by causing
 vibrations in the air. Rather, consider the possibility that they instead push
 thoughts into the minds of those it interacts with causing them to experience the
 sensation of hearing and seeing them as a means to communicate
 Your brain receives thoughts of the meanings and concepts the being intends to
 convey. That's why you hear them in your native language, no matter what you
 speak or where you're at. This also comes with the bonus of explaining why
 proof is never found on audio or video recordings. The sights and sounds you
 perceive didn't actually physically happen. You could also reasonably argue that
 they'd still be able to interact with (push) physical objects with strong enough
 emotions through some means (depending on canon) while communicating in
 this manner by saying that expanding and contracting the air in such a way to
 create the sound of voice with intelligible words would require far too much
 precision and control
 ldk. It's fun stuff to think about.
 Source:strange-emily #brain waves #translation #ghost echnology
 #humans are space australians #humans are insane #humans are space oddities
 #humans are space orcs #humans are weird #humans
 16,100 notes
A neat solution to a worldbuilding problem

A neat solution to a worldbuilding problem

Gobie: 1 Washington Post @washingtonpost WASHINGTON POST Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious wapo.st/ 1GMj8FR mad ethnic & ignant @BrokeHomieLarry White people did all that research just to find out they used seasoning Washington Post @washingtonpost Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious wapo.st/1GMj8FR <p><a href="http://fierceawakening.tumblr.com/post/147793377460/raina-of-winter-thresholdofzero" class="tumblr_blog">fierceawakening</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://raina-of-winter.tumblr.com/post/147726187865">raina-of-winter</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://thresholdofzero.tumblr.com/post/147718413228">thresholdofzero</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://kittehinfurs.tumblr.com/post/147704893505">kittehinfurs</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://fuckingrecipes.tumblr.com/post/147699069008">fuckingrecipes</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://pettyeol.tumblr.com/post/1">pettyeol</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://the-bitch-goddess-success.tumblr.com/post/145999238532">the-bitch-goddess-success</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://sodhya.tumblr.com/post/145991940514">sodhya</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>This got me dying</p> </blockquote> <p>who paid for this study bruh</p> </blockquote> <p>it’‘s literally seasoning.  that’s it. that’s what make food taste good.<br/></p> </blockquote> <p>Bro it’s more complex than just ‘ey they used seasoning’ </p> <p>It’s HOW they used seasoning, compared to other areas of the world. </p> <p>Indian seasoning does this neat color wheel of flavor, fitting a bunch of spices that are very DIFFERENT from each other, to create a huge range of complex flavor. </p> <p>Meanwhile in Italy for instance, they tend to use flavors that are SIMILAR. For instance, Basil and Oregano, or Sweet fish with Sweet wine. It makes foods less likely to contrast weirdly in your mouth, and it’s the basis of why fancy european people pair red wines with steak and white wines with chicken. Savory with Savory, Light with Light.   </p> <p><a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=https%3A%2F%2Fmunchies.vice.com%2Fen%2Farticles%2Ftheres-a-scientific-reason-why-indian-food-is-so-delicious&amp;t=MTZhNTU0MTRjMGNlNjEyMDVlMWQ0YmZjY2NmZDc5ZjVjZmYzOGZiMixmMFVzOUFBRA%3D%3D">But the Indian food steps it up a notch. The research is definitely worth a read. </a></p> <blockquote><p>“ That like flavors should be combined for better dishes—an unspoken but popular hypothesis stipulated by recipe-building in North American, Western European, and Latin American cultures—is an idea essentially reversed in Indian cuisine. “ <br/></p></blockquote> </blockquote> <p>well yes, spices need to not just complement the food but contrast against each other. to get maximum flavour when cooking indian food:</p> <p>1. use whole spices, dry roast small quantities of individual spices together and then grind them to a powder. balance is what you’re looking for, not just chucking in handfuls of seasonings willy nilly because quantity does not equal flavour when it comes to spicing indian food. </p> <p>2. whole spices go in the oil first. always. also everything gets fried on its own before it’s chucked into the sauce/curry. even the curry base is started off by frying onions/ginger/garlic/tomatoes or any combination thereof. basically…FRY THAT SHIT. i don’t know of any regional cuisine in india that uses stock for simmering. frying everything individually is how we add flavour instead.  </p> <p>3. indian food needs to be cooked long and slow for the flavours to really merge. don’t skimp on the cooking time if you can because that makes a huge difference. </p> </blockquote> <p>This was so enlightening</p> </blockquote> <p>I feel a need to mention that the researchers for this study are NOT white, as stated above. They’re Indian. It’s Indian people saying “why does our cuisine work and taste so vastly different than anywhere else in the world?” To quote from the article: </p> <p>“Researchers Anupam Jaina, Rakhi N Kb, and Ganesh Bagler from the Indian Institute for Technology in Jodhpur ran a fine-tooth comb through TarlaDalal.com—a recipe database of more than 17,000 dishes that self-identifies as “India’s #1 food site”—in attempts to decode the magic of your chicken tikka masala or aloo gobi.”</p> </blockquote> <p>I’m so tired of the “white people don’t know what spices are” meme showing up where it doesn’t belong.</p></blockquote>
Gobie: 1 Washington Post
 @washingtonpost
 WASHINGTON
 POST
 Scientists have figured out what makes
 Indian food so delicious wapo.st/
 1GMj8FR

 mad ethnic & ignant
 @BrokeHomieLarry
 White people did all that research just to
 find out they used seasoning
 Washington Post @washingtonpost
 Scientists have figured out
 what makes Indian food so
 delicious wapo.st/1GMj8FR
<p><a href="http://fierceawakening.tumblr.com/post/147793377460/raina-of-winter-thresholdofzero" class="tumblr_blog">fierceawakening</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://raina-of-winter.tumblr.com/post/147726187865">raina-of-winter</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://thresholdofzero.tumblr.com/post/147718413228">thresholdofzero</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://kittehinfurs.tumblr.com/post/147704893505">kittehinfurs</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://fuckingrecipes.tumblr.com/post/147699069008">fuckingrecipes</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://pettyeol.tumblr.com/post/1">pettyeol</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://the-bitch-goddess-success.tumblr.com/post/145999238532">the-bitch-goddess-success</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://sodhya.tumblr.com/post/145991940514">sodhya</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>This got me dying</p>
</blockquote>
<p>who paid for this study bruh</p>
</blockquote>
<p>it’‘s literally seasoning.  that’s it. that’s what make food taste good.<br/></p>
</blockquote>
<p>Bro it’s more complex than just ‘ey they used seasoning’ </p>
<p>It’s HOW they used seasoning, compared to other areas of the world. </p>
<p>Indian seasoning does this neat color wheel of flavor, fitting a bunch of spices that are very DIFFERENT from each other, to create a huge range of complex flavor. </p>
<p>Meanwhile in Italy for instance, they tend to use flavors that are SIMILAR. For instance, Basil and Oregano, or Sweet fish with Sweet wine. It makes foods less likely to contrast weirdly in your mouth, and it’s the basis of why fancy european people pair red wines with steak and white wines with chicken. Savory with Savory, Light with Light.   </p>
<p><a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=https%3A%2F%2Fmunchies.vice.com%2Fen%2Farticles%2Ftheres-a-scientific-reason-why-indian-food-is-so-delicious&amp;t=MTZhNTU0MTRjMGNlNjEyMDVlMWQ0YmZjY2NmZDc5ZjVjZmYzOGZiMixmMFVzOUFBRA%3D%3D">But the Indian food steps it up a notch. The research is definitely worth a read. </a></p>
<blockquote><p>“

That like flavors should be combined for better dishes—an unspoken but popular hypothesis stipulated by recipe-building in North American, Western European, and Latin American cultures—is an idea essentially reversed in Indian cuisine.
“
<br/></p></blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>well yes, spices need to not just complement the food but contrast against each other. to get maximum flavour when cooking indian food:</p>
<p>1. use whole spices, dry roast small quantities of individual spices together and then grind them to a powder. balance is what you’re looking for, not just chucking in handfuls of seasonings willy nilly because quantity does not equal flavour when it comes to spicing indian food. </p>
<p>2. whole spices go in the oil first. always. also everything gets fried on its own before it’s chucked into the sauce/curry. even the curry base is started off by frying onions/ginger/garlic/tomatoes or any combination thereof. basically…FRY THAT SHIT. i don’t know of any regional cuisine in india that uses stock for simmering. frying everything individually is how we add flavour instead.  </p>
<p>3. indian food needs to be cooked long and slow for the flavours to really merge. don’t skimp on the cooking time if you can because that makes a huge difference. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>This was so enlightening</p>
</blockquote>
<p>I feel a need to mention that the researchers for this study are NOT white, as stated above. They’re Indian. It’s Indian people saying “why does our cuisine work and taste so vastly different than anywhere else in the world?” To quote from the article: </p>
<p>“Researchers Anupam Jaina, Rakhi N Kb, and Ganesh Bagler from the Indian Institute for Technology in Jodhpur ran a fine-tooth comb through TarlaDalal.com—a recipe database of more than 17,000 dishes that self-identifies as “India’s #1 food site”—in attempts to decode the magic of your chicken tikka masala or aloo gobi.”</p>
</blockquote>

<p>I’m so tired of the “white people don’t know what spices are” meme showing up where it doesn’t belong.</p></blockquote>

<p><a href="http://fierceawakening.tumblr.com/post/147793377460/raina-of-winter-thresholdofzero" class="tumblr_blog">fierceawakening</a>:...