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Occupy Democrats
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fallen: F for our fallen soldier dog
fallen: F for our fallen soldier dog

F for our fallen soldier dog

fallen: f for our fallen soldier
fallen: f for our fallen soldier

f for our fallen soldier

fallen: Lotange My daughter fell asleep in the cart at the grocery store last night and she totally looked like a fallen viking warrior being sent out to sea.
fallen: Lotange
My daughter fell asleep in the cart at the grocery store last night and she totally looked like a fallen viking warrior being sent out to sea.

My daughter fell asleep in the cart at the grocery store last night and she totally looked like a fallen viking warrior being sent out to...

fallen: Lotange My daughter fell asleep in the cart at the grocery store last night and she totally looked like a fallen viking warrior being sent out to sea.
fallen: Lotange
My daughter fell asleep in the cart at the grocery store last night and she totally looked like a fallen viking warrior being sent out to sea.

My daughter fell asleep in the cart at the grocery store last night and she totally looked like a fallen viking warrior being sent out to...

fallen: Saving Your Grades From A Mental Health Crisis What To Do Before, During, And After by SmartStudy.tumblr.com IF YOUR GRADES ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER CONTACT YOUR TEACHERS This should be the first thing you do when you realise you're in crisis. Email them, and explain your situation in short, professional terms. You do not have to include details about your condition. "I have a mental health condition" should suffice as to the nature of the issue. Tell them that you are going to arrange to see a medical professional as soon as possible, and ask what process you should go through to defer/get an extension on assessment, and if they can help you in any way. Other people you may have to contact or CC in the email (depending on your school): University High School Head of House Class Coordinator Faculty/School Admin Disability Advisor Grade Coordinator Head of Department Academic Admin Counsellor School Counsellor Student Advocate BOOK A DOCTOR/THERAPIST APPOINTMENT ASAP This will be the person who can vouch for you the most. It's best if you have seen them before and they know you. If you can't get an appointment within a few days, call them and email them (if you haven't seen them before this will not work). Make sure to check out what counselling your university or school offers. During this appointment, the priority is to make a plan to get you back on your feet. This effort will not be useful if you stay a mess. Once you've figured that out, get two things from this person. One is a medical certificate/letter stating that you have, in fact, been going through this crisis. Second is a letter that describes the nature of the crisis, what treatment you're going through, and which people to contact (psychiatrists, etc.) who can vouch for this. Note: The reason I say to get two letters is because there is still a huge stigma around mental illness, and you don't want to reveal that you've got a disorder that's highly stigmatised, only to have it come back and bite you in the ass later. Don't provide details unless it's necessary or asked for. A STUDENT KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AS Most schools and institutions will have a list of a student's rights and responsibilities online. Look them up. Know what your rights are as a student. Also look to see if there are state/national laws protecting you, or if your school is a part of a network of schools that has its own code. Some people working in schools still think mental health issues are trivial, and you never know when they're going to ignore a rule to suit themselves. Make sure you can pick on this if it happens to you. Pretty much all schools will have protection in place for students with mental illnesses and disabilities, so even if you a miss a deadline for a form or make another mistake, they should take your exceptional circumstances into account. This is where a student or disability advisor from school can help you. ottom IF YOU HAVEN'T REACHED CRISIS YET TALK TO A DOCTOR/THERAPIST/COUNSELLOR/TRUSTED ADULT If you're going through a hard time, talk to someone who can help you. Any trusted adult or professional can help you get back on your feet before it's too late, or refer you to someone who can. If it's a new issue, you'll have to see someone like a GP who can refer you to a therapist or mental health service. Talk to them about what's been happening, and say that you need help. Sometimes, even talking about the problem can help you feel better. In these situations, they can also help you figure out what you can do at school to catch up/get special help. FIGURE OUT HOW TO STUDY WHILE IN A BAD STATE Even if you're getting help, it might be some time before you're fully back on track. In these instances, try to make the best of a bad situation. Can't leave the house? Access lecture recordings and eBooks. Ask your friends to send you their notes, or ask the teacher if you can submit your homework via email, or through a friend. Have trouble concentrating? Figure out how long you can study without needing a break, and make a schedule around that. Always make sure to ask your teachers if they can help you with this. Whether it be slightly changing the requirements or conditions of a piece of assessment, or simply their understanding that you may not be able to attend perfectly, it can make a big difference with your overall marks. If they don't know you're struggling, they can't help! DON'T PUSH YOURSELF OR OVERTHINK When you realise there's an issue, it's easy to fall into panic or try to power through. Don't do this. It'll just make you more stressed and aggravate the existing problems, which will make things much worse in the long run. Though it's hard to believe sometimes, your health and mental health are more important than your grades. You can't ignore your mind when it's screaming at you that something is wrong. Listen to it, and be easy on yourself. The best way to get back to your full potential to ask for help and give yourself what you need. Take a break when you need one and practise self-care. It's more important than you might things. RECOVERING FROM A BREAKDOWN ACCEPT THAT YOU'VE BEEN THROUGH SOMETHING MAJOR Once the worst has passed, some people try to brush it off and pretend it never happened. They can feel ashamed or embarrassed about what they went through. However, there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about, especially if you had a pre-existing mental health condition. Every life has ups and downs and just because yours were a bit more serious than some people's, it doesn't mean that you're weak somehow. The best thing you can do for yourself is to recognise what happened, and work to prevent it from happening again by setting up crisis plans and support networks. GET TUTORING TO CATCH UP If you've fallen behind, don't worry. There are plenty of ways to catch yourself up and get back on track. The best way is to hire a tutor. They can guide you through the work, help you understand difficult concepts, and identify the places you need more help. Yes, tutors can be expensive, but there's a way to get around this. See if there is anyone who took your class the year before who might be willing to tutor you for an hour each week for a discounted prince. Similarly, see if there are any students who can help you in exchange for something like instrument lessons. And if any of your friends are academically gifted, I'm sure they'd be able to help. If all else fails, go to office hours and any free tutoring sessions your school or university offers. Do some research, ask around, see what's there. PACE YOURSELF AND DON'T RUSH IN After a breakdown or crisis, you may be tempted to throw yourself back into your work to catch up. Don't! You'll become overwhelmed and end up back at square one. Remember, you've just been through a very difficult situation and you're not going to get better overnight. Ease yourself in. I definitely recommend starting with a reduced or part-time study load if possible. Remember that you may not be back at your full capacity just yet, and difficulties concentrating and being motivated could make things hard. By starting off slowly, you're able to get used to studying again without too much pressure. DEVELOP A ROUTINE Yes, this advice is in every piece of study advice ever, but you shouldn't develop just any routine. Develop one that allows you plenty of breaks and takes into consider any issues you may have with fatigue or focusing. If your breakdown was caused by overwork, make sure this one is easier on you. Things to include you could include in a healthy routine (but don't micromanage!): "I feel crap" time* Breaks and meals Plenty of sleep and rest "You" time (treat yo self) Time to plan for the next week Exercise (have you tried yoga? Kidding) Meditation/mindfulness Friend/family social time * Remember that the thoughts and feelings caused by mental illness are not shameful, and ignoring and forcing them down will only make them worse. If you need to lie in bed feeling miserable, do it. THINGS TO REMEMBER DON'T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS It can be easy to look at other people and see your own flaws, but it's important to try not to. Every person has different experiences and struggles, so it's not fair to yourself to look at someone without yours and think you're behind in some way. Taking longer to complete your studies isn't shameful. Making mistakes isn't shameful. Needing breaks isn't shameful. You'll get where you need to be in the end. Have patience. GRADES DON'T DEFINE YOU I spent so much of my life thinking my only worth came from my academic success. And guess what? This just led to more anxiety and depression. It's important to realise that things like grades, class rankings, GPAS, and "intelligence" aren't that important. Who you are and what you do is far more important than these arbitrary labels. THERE IS A STIGMA, SO BE PREPARED It's an unfortunate reality, but there is still a stigma against mental health issues and there is a chance it might affect your experiences while dealing with administrative staff and teachers. There have been stories about people telling their people supposed to be guiding them that they have mental health issues, and being dismissed because "it's a girl issue" or "it's all in their head". Be prepared in case this happens to you. Remind people that it's a medical condition and that you can get proof from medical professionals if need be. Plus, there is probably something in your school's policies or even the law that protects you when you have a mental illness. Remember that just because people are ignorant, that doesn't mean your issue is not 100% real and important. Don't let these people make you feel worse. YOU CAN DO THIS In our darkest moments, it can be hard to believe that we're capable of immense strength, but I promise you we are. Whatever obstacle is in your path right now - even if it's your brain chemistry - you are going to get through this. You've made it through every worst day you've had so far. You've made it through the dark and scary moments, and you've come out the other end stronger and wiser. Remember that you are strong, and even when you don't feel like it, there is always support available to help you realise that strength again. tmblimteom apricot-studies: smartstudy: Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot with mental health, and so I have been through a lot of breakdowns. So many that I actually dropped out of university after 3 weeks in 2016 and had to take the whole year off. Because of this, I’ve made it my mission to help others with mental health issues as much as I can, so you don’t have to go through what I’ve been through. Anyway, here is my guide. I tried to keep it general, and actually useful. If you have any questions or additions please feel free to add them. And as ever, if you want to talk to me about studying with mental illness or want to see a post on a specific topic, please feel free to message me. thank you so much for this
fallen: Saving Your Grades From
 A Mental Health Crisis
 What To Do Before, During, And After
 by SmartStudy.tumblr.com

 IF YOUR GRADES ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER
 CONTACT YOUR TEACHERS
 This should be the first thing you do when you realise you're in crisis. Email them, and explain your
 situation in short, professional terms. You do not have to include details about your condition. "I have
 a mental health condition" should suffice as to the nature of the issue.
 Tell them that you are going to arrange to see a medical professional as soon as possible, and ask what
 process you should go through to defer/get an extension on assessment, and if they can help you in
 any way.
 Other people you may have to contact or CC in the email (depending on your school):
 University
 High School
 Head of House
 Class Coordinator
 Faculty/School Admin
 Disability Advisor
 Grade Coordinator
 Head of Department
 Academic Admin
 Counsellor
 School Counsellor
 Student Advocate
 BOOK A DOCTOR/THERAPIST APPOINTMENT ASAP
 This will be the person who can vouch for you the most. It's best if you have seen them before and
 they know you. If you can't get an appointment within a few days, call them and email them (if you
 haven't seen them before this will not work). Make sure to check out what counselling your university
 or school offers.
 During this appointment, the priority is to make a plan to get you back on your feet. This effort will
 not be useful if you stay a mess. Once you've figured that out, get two things from this person. One is
 a medical certificate/letter stating that you have, in fact, been going through this crisis. Second is a
 letter that describes the nature of the crisis, what treatment you're going through, and which people
 to contact (psychiatrists, etc.) who can vouch for this.
 Note: The reason I say to get two letters is because there is still a huge stigma around mental illness,
 and you don't want to reveal that you've got a disorder that's highly stigmatised, only to have it come
 back and bite you in the ass later. Don't provide details unless it's necessary or asked for.
 A STUDENT
 KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AS
 Most schools and institutions will have a list of a student's rights and responsibilities online. Look them
 up. Know what your rights are as a student. Also look to see if there are state/national laws protecting
 you, or if your school is a part of a network of schools that has its own code. Some people working in
 schools still think mental health issues are trivial, and you never know when they're going to ignore a
 rule to suit themselves. Make sure you can pick on this if it happens to you.
 Pretty much all schools will have protection in place for students with mental illnesses and disabilities,
 so even if you a miss a deadline for a form or make another mistake, they should take your exceptional
 circumstances into account. This is where a student or disability advisor from school can help you.
 ottom

 IF YOU HAVEN'T REACHED CRISIS YET
 TALK TO A DOCTOR/THERAPIST/COUNSELLOR/TRUSTED ADULT
 If you're going through a hard time, talk to someone who can help you. Any trusted adult or
 professional can help you get back on your feet before it's too late, or refer you to someone who can.
 If it's a new issue, you'll have to see someone like a GP who can refer you to a therapist or mental
 health service.
 Talk to them about what's been happening, and say that you need help. Sometimes, even talking
 about the problem can help you feel better. In these situations, they can also help you figure out what
 you can do at school to catch up/get special help.
 FIGURE OUT HOW TO STUDY WHILE IN A BAD STATE
 Even if you're getting help, it might be some time before you're fully back on track. In these instances,
 try to make the best of a bad situation.
 Can't leave the house? Access lecture recordings and eBooks. Ask your friends to send you their notes,
 or ask the teacher if you can submit your homework via email, or through a friend. Have trouble
 concentrating? Figure out how long you can study without needing a break, and make a schedule
 around that.
 Always make sure to ask your teachers if they can help you with this. Whether it be slightly changing
 the requirements or conditions of a piece of assessment, or simply their understanding that you may
 not be able to attend perfectly, it can make a big difference with your overall marks. If they don't know
 you're struggling, they can't help!
 DON'T PUSH YOURSELF OR OVERTHINK
 When you realise there's an issue, it's easy to fall into panic or try to power through. Don't do this. It'll
 just make you more stressed and aggravate the existing problems, which will make things much worse
 in the long run.
 Though it's hard to believe sometimes, your health and mental health are more important than your
 grades. You can't ignore your mind when it's screaming at you that something is wrong. Listen to it,
 and be easy on yourself.
 The best way to get back to your full potential to ask for help and give yourself what you need. Take a
 break when you need one and practise self-care. It's more important than you might things.

 RECOVERING FROM A BREAKDOWN
 ACCEPT THAT YOU'VE BEEN THROUGH SOMETHING MAJOR
 Once the worst has passed, some people try to brush it off and pretend it never happened. They can
 feel ashamed or embarrassed about what they went through. However, there is absolutely nothing to
 be ashamed or embarrassed about, especially if you had a pre-existing mental health condition. Every
 life has ups and downs and just because yours were a bit more serious than some people's, it doesn't
 mean that you're weak somehow.
 The best thing you can do for yourself is to recognise what happened, and work to prevent it from
 happening again by setting up crisis plans and support networks.
 GET TUTORING TO CATCH UP
 If you've fallen behind, don't worry. There are plenty of ways to catch yourself up and get back on
 track. The best way is to hire a tutor. They can guide you through the work, help you understand
 difficult concepts, and identify the places you need more help.
 Yes, tutors can be expensive, but there's a way to get around this. See if there is anyone who took
 your class the year before who might be willing to tutor you for an hour each week for a discounted
 prince. Similarly, see if there are any students who can help you in exchange for something like
 instrument lessons. And if any of your friends are academically gifted, I'm sure they'd be able to help.
 If all else fails, go to office hours and any free tutoring sessions your school or university offers. Do
 some research, ask around, see what's there.
 PACE YOURSELF AND DON'T RUSH IN
 After a breakdown or crisis, you may be tempted to throw yourself back into your work to catch up.
 Don't! You'll become overwhelmed and end up back at square one. Remember, you've just been
 through a very difficult situation and you're not going to get better overnight.
 Ease yourself in. I definitely recommend starting with a reduced or part-time study load if possible.
 Remember that you may not be back at your full capacity just yet, and difficulties concentrating and
 being motivated could make things hard. By starting off slowly, you're able to get used to studying
 again without too much pressure.
 DEVELOP A ROUTINE
 Yes, this advice is in every piece of study advice ever, but you shouldn't develop just any routine.
 Develop one that allows you plenty of breaks and takes into consider any issues you may have with
 fatigue or focusing. If your breakdown was caused by overwork, make sure this one is easier on you.
 Things to include you could include in a healthy routine (but don't micromanage!):
 "I feel crap" time*
 Breaks and meals
 Plenty of sleep and rest
 "You" time (treat yo self)
 Time to plan for the next week
 Exercise (have you tried yoga? Kidding)
 Meditation/mindfulness
 Friend/family social time
 * Remember that the thoughts and feelings caused by mental illness are not shameful, and ignoring
 and forcing them down will only make them worse. If you need to lie in bed feeling miserable, do it.

 THINGS TO REMEMBER
 DON'T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS
 It can be easy to look at other people and see your own flaws, but it's important to try not to. Every
 person has different experiences and struggles, so it's not fair to yourself to look at someone without
 yours and think you're behind in some way.
 Taking longer to complete your studies isn't shameful. Making mistakes isn't shameful. Needing
 breaks isn't shameful. You'll get where you need to be in the end. Have patience.
 GRADES DON'T DEFINE YOU
 I spent so much of my life thinking my only worth came from my academic success. And guess what?
 This just led to more anxiety and depression. It's important to realise that things like grades, class
 rankings, GPAS, and "intelligence" aren't that important. Who you are and what you do is far more
 important than these arbitrary labels.
 THERE IS A STIGMA, SO BE PREPARED
 It's an unfortunate reality, but there is still a stigma against mental health issues and there is a chance
 it might affect your experiences while dealing with administrative staff and teachers. There have been
 stories about people telling their people supposed to be guiding them that they have mental health
 issues, and being dismissed because "it's a girl issue" or "it's all in their head".
 Be prepared in case this happens to you. Remind people that it's a medical condition and that you can
 get proof from medical professionals if need be. Plus, there is probably something in your school's
 policies or even the law that protects you when you have a mental illness.
 Remember that just because people are ignorant, that doesn't mean your issue is not 100% real and
 important. Don't let these people make you feel worse.
 YOU CAN DO THIS
 In our darkest moments, it can be hard to believe that we're capable of immense strength, but I
 promise you we are. Whatever obstacle is in your path right now - even if it's your brain chemistry -
 you are going to get through this.
 You've made it through every worst day you've had so far. You've made it through the dark and scary
 moments, and you've come out the other end stronger and wiser.
 Remember that you are strong, and even when you don't feel like it, there is always support available
 to help you realise that strength again.
 tmblimteom
apricot-studies:
smartstudy:

Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot with mental health, and so I have been through a lot of breakdowns. So many that I actually dropped out of university after 3 weeks in 2016 and had to take the whole year off. Because of this, I’ve made it my mission to help others with mental health issues as much as I can, so you don’t have to go through what I’ve been through.
Anyway, here is my guide. I tried to keep it general, and actually useful. If you have any questions or additions please feel free to add them. 
And as ever, if you want to talk to me about studying with mental illness or want to see a post on a specific topic, please feel free to message me. 

thank you so much for this

apricot-studies: smartstudy: Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot...

fallen: C humansofnewyork: “Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check to check.  At the time we were staying in the projects with my mother-in-law, but my kids were growing up, so we needed our own place.  But all the rental brokers wanted to see our bank statements.  And we had no savings.  We didn’t even have accounts.  Then one day I was walking down the avenue, and I saw a super fixing up an empty apartment.  I told him I needed to speak to the landlord directly.  No brokers.  And I guess he liked my vibe, because he gave me the name: Ronald Petrowski.  When I called Mr. Petrowski, I explained everything.  I told him we needed a chance.  He agreed to meet me and my husband at Lenny’s Pizzeria.  He bought us a plain pie and listened to our story.  He’d grown up poor himself, so he knew the struggle.  And he gave us a chance.  We’ve been in that apartment for 35 years now, and I’ve paid him every cent.  We’ve fallen on hard times.  At one point I owed him an entire year of rent.  But he was so gracious.  He never sent us an eviction notice.  Every time he came to collect, he’d sit at our kitchen table, have a cup of coffee, and listen to our situation.  Mr. Petrowski is my hero.  He sold the building a couple years ago, but we still keep in touch.  That man gave me a home to raise my children.”
fallen: C
humansofnewyork:

“Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living check to check.  At the time we were staying in the projects with my mother-in-law, but my kids were growing up, so we needed our own place.  But all the rental brokers wanted to see our bank statements.  And we had no savings.  We didn’t even have accounts.  Then one day I was walking down the avenue, and I saw a super fixing up an empty apartment.  I told him I needed to speak to the landlord directly.  No brokers.  And I guess he liked my vibe, because he gave me the name: Ronald Petrowski.  When I called Mr. Petrowski, I explained everything.  I told him we needed a chance.  He agreed to meet me and my husband at Lenny’s Pizzeria.  He bought us a plain pie and listened to our story.  He’d grown up poor himself, so he knew the struggle.  And he gave us a chance.  We’ve been in that apartment for 35 years now, and I’ve paid him every cent.  We’ve fallen on hard times.  At one point I owed him an entire year of rent.  But he was so gracious.  He never sent us an eviction notice.  Every time he came to collect, he’d sit at our kitchen table, have a cup of coffee, and listen to our situation.  Mr. Petrowski is my hero.  He sold the building a couple years ago, but we still keep in touch.  That man gave me a home to raise my children.”

humansofnewyork: “Nobody would give us a chance.  We were in our early twenties.  We had two young kids.  We were working, but living ch...

fallen: summ'it, n. highest point, top, apex; highest degree. summit conference, meeting of heads of States. summon, vt. call together, require presence or au su'perfine, a. extremely fine in quality. superflu'ity (-floo-), n. superfluous amount. super'fluous (-floo-), a. more than enough, excessive; ncedless, uncalled-for. superhu'man abeyond normal human capacity; higher or greater than that of) man. superimpose' (-z), v.t. place on something dar buagharitsta annear A else. superintend', v. have or exercise charge or Ycew denee, or official direction of anking above su blace, upper; etc.; having aving above higher rank, ry or convent Superior). per iene dotank or savng c Avcrage nualie autherty, et FatherSaperior A Superio rit super lative Cor seo-) esof highest degree 6xpressing highes ceg denoted by simte fo ree or form su sing all oth- of adj., etc.) uality, ete., superlative an, n(pl permen) Sdeal superior ture; man of superhun an powers or , n. self service store selling sehold goods ofkinds. (-cher-), aaue to, manifest- gency above Tores of nature; nary operation cheerfulness brght intiuence of dark patches sometimes ob surface. su'stroke, illness ca sive exposure to heat of sun sunn'y, a. ht with sunlight: sun'dae (-da confection of ice fruit, nuts, Sun'day, n tday of wreek, obser Christiansday of rest and worship. sun'der, v.tarchatc& Poet separate. sun'dry, a.various, se veral. sun'dries (-iz), n.pl. oddments, small items. sung, p.p. o sing sunk, p.p. sink. sunk'en, aof eves, cheeks, etc.) lholow fallen in. unny: see sun up, v. (p.t. spped), take supper. sup-, pref.:ee sub super- (or (of); beyod besides, execeding, tonscer ing; of higher kind atore than tisua superabundant, a very ot t06 ab superann'uate Sion, esp. br discards fo8 old annua'tion, n. superb' (or soo-), a. of most excellent or impressive kind, magnificent, majestic. súpercil'ious, a haughtily contemptuous, dis- dainful, or superior. superfi'cial (-shl), a. of or on the surfat Lwithout depth. superficial'ity (-shi-), n cause and n or thing) in ary, a. & he normal numbe e (-z), v. t. place abo or on some- else, esp. so as to cooede. superpo' 5able, a. su'perscribe, v. t. write orinsce over, at top of or outside something. suúpenscrip'tion, n. supersede, v.t take the placef; be adopted or accepted instead of superson ie, a having speed ater than that Of Sound. suners tie n(habit or bet ef based on) Sraonal ar of the1 hakhotn; belief in agic sapematural poversc. supersti- iousshus) a súperstaictore cher) n sucture resting on Somethingg lse as a foundation; parts of pref ovee abeve en to aboge main deck occtras an interruption or as hange süperen'tion, n. erintend per- cter of over- cause see. supervi'sion (-zhn), n. si'pervisor, n. supervi'sory, a. su'pine, a. lying face upwards; indolent, lethargic, inert. supp'er, n. meal taken at end of day, esp. evening meal less formal and substantial than dinner. supp'eriess, a. 31 conduct. mo'rality play, medieval moraliz- ing drama. mo'ralize, v. talk or write on moral aspect of things; interpret morally morass', n. wet swampy area, bog. mor'bid, a. not natural and healthy; of, indi- cating, disease. morbid'ity, n. mor'dant, a. biting, stinging; (of acids) corro- (French) monsoon', n. seasonal wind prevailing in S Asia; rainy season accompanying SW. mon- SOon mo l 8 m ional quan- v. to greater eo'ver, adv. me r m rriage, one woman of rmer station claim to У r een man who child m t п S. religious m m ti il m oon or mid- of goatskin Fig 2 rtreated feeble- m moron'ic, red. substance sen pain. ional dance and phipo um ant ra moon. mo moon'stond appearance dreamy. moor, n. heather-cov billed wate moors. moor2, v. t. a shore or place, charg . pl. place mooring. Moor, n. ofMu NW. Africa h moose, n. (pl e NAnank moot, n. (Hi ceting esp. legistative or judicial. a. e a guedr debtable v. raise (quest mор, п. bund use in clear wipe (as) wi mope, v. i. bè mo'ped, n. m moraine ni mo'ral, a. concemedwn character, ere, o with right and wrong; good, virtuous. n. moral teaching; (pl.) habits or conduct from moral point of view. mo'rally, adv. morale(-ahl),n. discipline and spirit pervad. ing army or group of people. mo'ralist, n. one who points out morals; who teaches morality. moralis'tic, a moral'ity, n. moral principles or rules; moa long signals g letters of rac o, etc. r aantity. ra cannot live iman being. ause death; KO arpabe mor Sel, na oE'tale aGmast oreve c hor'tally so as extremely,c Omortal ity, n ng Seoalfo ss of life on alarge scale death-re mor tar, n vessel n which gs, etc., are pounded with a pestle shells. e Sand and water used bricks, ejc. mortaf aulding tortar with flat squa mortgago g deal aceba un throwing ture of lime ints between ard on which college cap highhang FR d cussion C. ixed lo stick for Hopped, elean or with mpp ce of right to money, until ver by mort- gage, preage advatce.. BIAgee, n hol- der of mortgage. mortgagor jor), n. per- son who pledges property in mosigage. mor'tify, v. bring under control by discipline and self-control: humiliate. listress: (of flesh) be affected with gangrene. mortifi- ३2 ca'tion, n. or'tise, n. hole into which end (tenon) of another part of framework, etc., is fitted. v. t. stretchtarot:The Sun & Moon, Lenormand cards 31 and 32
fallen: summ'it, n. highest point, top, apex; highest
 degree. summit conference, meeting of
 heads of States.
 summon, vt. call together, require presence
 or au
 su'perfine, a. extremely fine in quality.
 superflu'ity (-floo-), n. superfluous amount.
 super'fluous (-floo-), a. more than enough,
 excessive; ncedless, uncalled-for.
 superhu'man abeyond normal human
 capacity; higher or greater than that of) man.
 superimpose' (-z), v.t. place on something
 dar buagharitsta annear
 A
 else.
 superintend', v. have or exercise charge or
 Ycew denee,
 or official
 direction of
 anking above
 su
 blace, upper;
 etc.; having
 aving above
 higher rank,
 ry or convent
 Superior).
 per
 iene dotank
 or savng c
 Avcrage nualie
 autherty, et
 FatherSaperior A
 Superio rit
 super lative Cor seo-)
 esof highest degree
 6xpressing highes ceg
 denoted by simte fo
 ree or form
 su
 sing all oth-
 of adj., etc.)
 uality, ete.,
 superlative
 an, n(pl permen) Sdeal superior
 ture; man of superhun an powers or
 , n. self service store selling
 sehold goods ofkinds.
 (-cher-), aaue to, manifest-
 gency above Tores of nature;
 nary operation
 cheerfulness brght intiuence
 of dark patches sometimes ob
 surface. su'stroke, illness ca
 sive exposure to heat of sun
 sunn'y, a. ht with sunlight:
 sun'dae (-da confection of ice
 fruit, nuts,
 Sun'day, n tday of wreek, obser
 Christiansday of rest and worship.
 sun'der, v.tarchatc& Poet separate.
 sun'dry, a.various, se veral. sun'dries (-iz),
 n.pl. oddments, small items.
 sung, p.p. o sing
 sunk, p.p. sink.
 sunk'en, aof eves, cheeks, etc.) lholow
 fallen in.
 unny: see sun
 up, v. (p.t. spped), take supper.
 sup-, pref.:ee sub
 super- (or
 (of); beyod besides, execeding, tonscer
 ing; of higher kind atore than tisua
 superabundant, a very ot t06 ab
 superann'uate
 Sion, esp.
 br discards fo8 old
 annua'tion, n.
 superb' (or soo-), a. of most excellent or
 impressive kind, magnificent, majestic.
 súpercil'ious, a haughtily contemptuous, dis-
 dainful, or superior.
 superfi'cial (-shl), a. of or on the surfat
 Lwithout depth. superficial'ity (-shi-), n
 cause and
 n or thing) in
 ary, a. &
 he normal numbe
 e (-z), v. t. place abo
 or on some-
 else, esp. so as to cooede. superpo'
 5able, a.
 su'perscribe, v. t. write orinsce over, at top
 of or outside something. suúpenscrip'tion, n.
 supersede, v.t take the placef; be adopted
 or accepted instead of
 superson ie, a having speed ater than that
 Of Sound.
 suners tie n(habit or bet ef based on)
 Sraonal ar of the1 hakhotn; belief in
 agic sapematural poversc. supersti-
 iousshus) a
 súperstaictore cher) n sucture resting
 on Somethingg lse as a foundation; parts of
 pref ovee abeve en to
 aboge main deck
 occtras an interruption or as
 hange süperen'tion, n.
 erintend per-
 cter of over-
 cause
 see. supervi'sion (-zhn), n. si'pervisor, n.
 supervi'sory, a.
 su'pine, a. lying face upwards; indolent,
 lethargic, inert.
 supp'er, n. meal taken at end of day, esp.
 evening meal less formal and substantial than
 dinner. supp'eriess, a.
 31

 conduct. mo'rality play, medieval moraliz-
 ing drama.
 mo'ralize, v. talk or write on moral aspect of
 things; interpret morally
 morass', n. wet swampy area, bog.
 mor'bid, a. not natural and healthy; of, indi-
 cating, disease. morbid'ity, n.
 mor'dant, a. biting, stinging; (of acids) corro-
 (French)
 monsoon', n. seasonal wind prevailing in S
 Asia; rainy season accompanying SW. mon-
 SOon
 mo
 l
 8
 m
 ional quan-
 v. to greater
 eo'ver, adv.
 me
 r
 m
 rriage, one
 woman of
 rmer station
 claim to
 У
 r
 een man
 who
 child
 m
 t
 п
 S. religious
 m
 m
 ti
 il
 m
 oon or mid-
 of goatskin
 Fig 2 rtreated
 feeble-
 m
 moron'ic,
 red.
 substance
 sen pain.
 ional dance
 and
 phipo
 um ant
 ra
 moon. mo
 moon'stond
 appearance
 dreamy.
 moor, n.
 heather-cov
 billed wate
 moors.
 moor2, v. t. a
 shore or
 place, charg
 . pl. place
 mooring.
 Moor, n. ofMu
 NW. Africa h
 moose, n. (pl e NAnank
 moot, n. (Hi ceting esp. legistative or
 judicial. a. e a guedr debtable v.
 raise (quest
 mор, п. bund
 use in clear
 wipe (as) wi
 mope, v. i. bè
 mo'ped, n. m
 moraine ni
 mo'ral, a. concemedwn character, ere, o
 with right and wrong; good, virtuous. n.
 moral teaching; (pl.) habits or conduct from
 moral point of view. mo'rally, adv.
 morale(-ahl),n. discipline and spirit pervad.
 ing army or group of people.
 mo'ralist, n. one who points out morals;
 who teaches morality. moralis'tic, a
 moral'ity, n. moral principles or rules; moa
 long signals
 g letters of
 rac o, etc.
 r aantity.
 ra cannot live
 iman being.
 ause death;
 KO
 arpabe
 mor Sel, na
 oE'tale aGmast
 oreve c
 hor'tally so as
 extremely,c
 Omortal ity, n ng Seoalfo ss of life on
 alarge scale death-re
 mor tar, n vessel n which gs, etc., are
 pounded with a pestle
 shells. e
 Sand and water used
 bricks, ejc. mortaf
 aulding tortar
 with flat squa
 mortgago
 g deal
 aceba
 un throwing
 ture of lime
 ints between
 ard on which
 college cap
 highhang
 FR d cussion
 C. ixed lo stick for
 Hopped, elean or
 with mpp
 ce of right to
 money, until
 ver by mort-
 gage, preage advatce.. BIAgee, n hol-
 der of mortgage. mortgagor jor), n. per-
 son who pledges property in mosigage.
 mor'tify, v. bring under control by discipline
 and self-control: humiliate. listress: (of
 flesh) be affected with gangrene. mortifi-
 ३2
 ca'tion, n.
 or'tise, n. hole into which end (tenon) of
 another part of framework, etc., is fitted. v. t.
stretchtarot:The Sun & Moon, Lenormand cards 31 and 32

stretchtarot:The Sun & Moon, Lenormand cards 31 and 32