The Games
The Games

The Games

Timeline
Timeline

Timeline

Dont Get It
Dont Get It

Dont Get It

When The
When The

When The

Typed
Typed

Typed

The
The

The

Rioting
Rioting

Rioting

Bibled
Bibled

Bibled

possess
possess

possess

logical
logical

logical

🔥 | Latest

explain: I know stack overflow comments gets a lot of hate here, but sometimes you find these over the top comments that just explain everything that you had trouble with.
explain: I know stack overflow comments gets a lot of hate here, but sometimes you find these over the top comments that just explain everything that you had trouble with.

I know stack overflow comments gets a lot of hate here, but sometimes you find these over the top comments that just explain everything t...

explain: “How do i explain this to mom”
explain: “How do i explain this to mom”

“How do i explain this to mom”

explain: TikTok danojok86 JTikTok @snejok86 feniczoroark: injuries-in-dust: sewickedthread: coredesignixandnekonee: the-real-numbers: ilfaitdusoleil: bigwordsandsharpedges: Ball lightning is a rare electrical phenomenon. Scientists aren’t certain what creates it, and once disputed that ball lighning existed at all. Some argued that it was simply the electromagnetic field of an electrical storm causing visual hallucinations by exciting neurons in the brain, an effect called transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, recent high-definition video proved that at least some instances must be a real physical effect. Spectrograpic analysis of this images suggests that ball lightning is made of vaporized silicon contained within a self-contained electromagnetic bubble, effectively making a naturally occurring electric arc lamp. Laboratory experiments successfully replicated the glowing ball of plasma, which hovered for several seconds. Unfortunately, other lab experiments create similar visual effects using wildly different methods, including electrically-excited nanoparticles, water shocked by capacitors to simulate lightning, and a bubble of ionized gas fuelled for many seconds by a vast atmospheric energy field. The varying size of that energy-pumping field would conveniently explain the unpredictable size, duration, and electrical power levels observed in ball lightning. So we’re still not sure what that thing in the video really is, but it may be possible to create something like that in a dozen different ways. I would lose my mind like a 15th century peasant if I saw this walking down the street Me crossing the street Willow wisps? Joe Baldwin, is that you? Some historical instances of seeing g angels are now believed to have been ancient people encountering ball lighting. Don’t move, don’t shoot it, stay against the wall Artjom don’t move.
explain: TikTok
 danojok86

 JTikTok
 @snejok86
feniczoroark:

injuries-in-dust:

sewickedthread:

coredesignixandnekonee:
the-real-numbers:

ilfaitdusoleil:

bigwordsandsharpedges:


Ball lightning is a rare electrical phenomenon. Scientists aren’t certain what creates it, and once disputed that ball lighning existed at all. Some argued that it was simply the electromagnetic field of an electrical storm causing visual hallucinations by exciting neurons in the brain, an effect called transcranial magnetic stimulation. 
However, recent high-definition video proved that at least some instances must be a real physical effect. Spectrograpic analysis of this images suggests that ball lightning is made of vaporized silicon contained within a self-contained electromagnetic bubble, effectively making a naturally occurring electric arc lamp. 
Laboratory experiments successfully replicated the glowing ball of plasma, which hovered for several seconds. 
Unfortunately, other lab experiments create similar visual effects using wildly different methods, including electrically-excited nanoparticles, water shocked by capacitors to simulate lightning, and a bubble of ionized gas fuelled for many seconds by a vast atmospheric energy field. 
The varying size of that energy-pumping field would conveniently explain the unpredictable size, duration, and electrical power levels observed in ball lightning.
So we’re still not sure what that thing in the video really is, but it may be possible to create something like that in a dozen different ways. 



I would lose my mind like a 15th century peasant if I saw this walking down the street 



Me crossing the street



Willow wisps?

Joe Baldwin, is that you?


Some historical instances of seeing g angels are now believed to have been ancient people encountering ball lighting.


Don’t move, don’t shoot it, stay against the wall


Artjom don’t move.

feniczoroark: injuries-in-dust: sewickedthread: coredesignixandnekonee: the-real-numbers: ilfaitdusoleil: bigwordsandsharpedges: B...

explain: iamthebricklayer: Disney, PLEASE EXPLAIN.
explain: iamthebricklayer:

Disney, PLEASE EXPLAIN.

iamthebricklayer: Disney, PLEASE EXPLAIN.

explain: Wanna come over to watch Netflix? Is it really just Netflix? She dressed so sexy & flirty today, she must want to have sex with me! Consent A concept everyone needs to know Sexual consent is Yes! Ok! Um..ok? Clear expression on giving consent Not ready In a nutshell, when you and your partner both agree to have sex. It's important to have mutual understanding before things get too hot and heavy. Only yes means yes When someone stays silent, assume it's a no. Do not force it on them. They might freeze upon stress rather than flight or fight. Silence or lack of resistance does NOT mean consent. Consent applies to everyone. I don't want sex. No one owes you sex, not even sex workers or your partner! Respect other people's will. Consent is about communication I changed my mind. It's ok. Ask for consent, every single time. Also, you can withdraw consent at any point if you feel uncomfortable. Consent is Freely Given W Not being pressured or intimidated into sexual activity. Reversible It's ok to withdraw. Informed You understand what's going to happen. Enthusiastic You're excited and you WANT to do this. S pecific Saying yes one thing doesn't mean saying yes to other things! These aren't consent Being drunk 'Maybe Stripping 2 Hint hint Assuming they want it Kissing Silence or lack of response A Erection These are consent V Absolutely That feels good I like this V 'm open to trying V I'm ready Clear verbal cues V Don't stop / Clear physical cues If you don't have consent, it's a crime. We wish you a merry Christmas! Stay safe! Best wishes, @ Melibu7.edu.au and @taapna_ac Consent, a concept every single person should know. Drew this piece to explain consent, collaboration with Aids Concern Organisation Hong Kong. Wish you a safe and merry Christmas :) by lovaduck MORE MEMES
explain: Wanna come over to watch Netflix?
 Is it really
 just Netflix?
 She dressed so
 sexy & flirty
 today, she must
 want to have
 sex with me!
 Consent
 A concept everyone needs to know
 Sexual consent is
 Yes!
 Ok!
 Um..ok?
 Clear expression on giving consent
 Not ready
 In a nutshell, when you and your partner
 both agree to have sex. It's important to
 have mutual understanding before things
 get too hot and heavy.
 Only yes means yes
 When someone
 stays silent, assume
 it's a no. Do not
 force it on them.
 They might freeze
 upon stress rather
 than flight or fight.
 Silence or lack of
 resistance does
 NOT mean consent.
 Consent applies to everyone.
 I don't want
 sex.
 No one owes you sex, not even
 sex workers or your partner!
 Respect other people's will.
 Consent is about communication
 I changed my mind.
 It's ok.
 Ask for consent, every single time.
 Also, you can withdraw consent
 at any point if you feel
 uncomfortable.
 Consent is
 Freely Given W
 Not being pressured or intimidated into
 sexual activity.
 Reversible
 It's ok to withdraw.
 Informed
 You understand what's going to happen.
 Enthusiastic
 You're excited and you WANT to do this.
 S pecific
 Saying yes one thing doesn't mean
 saying yes to other things!
 These aren't consent
 Being drunk
 'Maybe
 Stripping
 2 Hint hint
 Assuming they
 want it
 Kissing
 Silence or lack of
 response
 A
 Erection
 These are consent
 V Absolutely
 That feels good
 I like this
 V 'm open to trying
 V I'm ready
 Clear verbal cues
 V Don't stop
 / Clear physical cues
 If you don't have consent,
 it's a crime.
 We wish you a merry
 Christmas! Stay safe!
 Best wishes,
 @ Melibu7.edu.au and @taapna_ac
Consent, a concept every single person should know. Drew this piece to explain consent, collaboration with Aids Concern Organisation Hong Kong. Wish you a safe and merry Christmas :) by lovaduck
MORE MEMES

Consent, a concept every single person should know. Drew this piece to explain consent, collaboration with Aids Concern Organisation Hong...

explain: Trevor 12 hrs I have to admit, when Greta Thunberg began gaining popularity for her activism earlier this year, I didn't pay it much mind and just assumed it was another person complaining about global climate change without proposing and/or engaging in tangible, real world solutions. So, when I saw that she won TIME magazine's person of the year, I figured she has made great strides in combating climate change, and therefore I should probably take notice and take a look into how she is doing it and what she has proposed. Thankfully, I didn't have to look far since many people were posting her greatest hits here on FB. I admit, she appears quite passionate and she makes compelling points that something needs to be done to reverse climate change, all while being critical of everyone that says something needs to be done, but without proposing real world, tangible solutions that can broadly be applied to society. So, I keep watching and waiting for these solutions. As the videos draw to an end, I am yet to see anything of substance. Am I missing the part two of these? What is unique about her brand of activism? Is it just the accent? I am seriously interested in what reaction and results her activism has yielded. Can someone please explain it to me? I do have some issues with her "undeniable facts" and climate change activists, I will do my best to follow-up in the comments and/or other posts. Ben Grelle Yes, why isn't the 16-year old solving this crisis? What the hell, dude? Greta submitted the IPCC report as her testimony before Congress. That is what she bases her science on (as well as 99% of climate scientists) and that is where she asks people to go to look for the data and some of the solutions. (We won't have all the solutions as much of the research and emerging tech isn't well funded yet.) I don't think it is her responsibility to solve this. She is asking politicians to take this seriously. And she is inspiring a new generation to not be apathetic on this topic. That is what her activism is based on. And I think that is plenty. If you really want to look at the "real world" solutions, you can read the same report she did. There are 3 parts. The "summaries for policymakers" are the easiest to understand and a good place to start. You may need to download some PDFS. https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/ https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/ https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/ sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the comments… “She’s basically Hitler!” “Why isn’t she a seasoned public speaker who can give spontaneous answers to one of the world’s most complicated issues?” “She’s just a propagandist for all of those greedy climate scientists who make an average of $35-50K per year!”  And, my favorite… “Why doesn’t she time travel and sabotage Time Magazine’s printing press?” Being an advocate for the world not ending is exhausting.  But if even one of them reads even the summaries, I will be happy.  Here are the links to the report for anyone interested. They actually improved the website quite a bit from the last time I visited. I don’t even think you need to download PDFs for most of the information. PROGRESS! https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/
explain: Trevor
 12 hrs
 I have to admit, when Greta Thunberg began gaining popularity for her
 activism earlier this year, I didn't pay it much mind and just assumed it
 was another person complaining about global climate change without
 proposing and/or engaging in tangible, real world solutions. So, when I
 saw that she won TIME magazine's person of the year, I figured she
 has made great strides in combating climate change, and therefore I
 should probably take notice and take a look into how she is doing it and
 what she has proposed. Thankfully, I didn't have to look far since many
 people were posting her greatest hits here on FB. I admit, she appears
 quite passionate and she makes compelling points that something
 needs to be done to reverse climate change, all while being critical of
 everyone that says something needs to be done, but without proposing
 real world, tangible solutions that can broadly be applied to society. So,
 I keep watching and waiting for these solutions. As the videos draw to
 an end, I am yet to see anything of substance. Am I missing the part
 two of these? What is unique about her brand of activism? Is it just the
 accent? I am seriously interested in what reaction and results her
 activism has yielded. Can someone please explain it to me? I do have
 some issues with her "undeniable facts" and climate change activists, I
 will do my best to follow-up in the comments and/or other posts.

 Ben Grelle Yes, why isn't the 16-year old solving this
 crisis? What the hell, dude?
 Greta submitted the IPCC report as her testimony before
 Congress. That is what she bases her science on (as well
 as 99% of climate scientists) and that is where she asks
 people to go to look for the data and some of the
 solutions. (We won't have all the solutions as much of the
 research and emerging tech isn't well funded yet.)
 I don't think it is her responsibility to solve this. She is
 asking politicians to take this seriously. And she is
 inspiring a new generation to not be apathetic on this
 topic. That is what her activism is based on. And I think
 that is plenty.
 If you really want to look at the "real world" solutions, you
 can read the same report she did.
 There are 3 parts. The "summaries for policymakers" are
 the easiest to understand and a good place to start. You
 may need to download some PDFS.
 https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/
 https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/
 https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/
sirfrogsworth:
Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change. 
Some other gems in the comments…
“She’s basically Hitler!”
“Why isn’t she a seasoned public speaker who can give spontaneous answers to one of the world’s most complicated issues?”
“She’s just a propagandist for all of those greedy climate scientists who make an average of $35-50K per year!” 
And, my favorite…
“Why doesn’t she time travel and sabotage Time Magazine’s printing press?”
Being an advocate for the world not ending is exhausting. 
But if even one of them reads even the summaries, I will be happy. 
Here are the links to the report for anyone interested. They actually improved the website quite a bit from the last time I visited. I don’t even think you need to download PDFs for most of the information. PROGRESS!
https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/

sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the...

explain: What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA? Charlie Knoles, I have lived in 5 countries and am an Aussie expat in the USA Answered 2d ago + Don't get out of your car ifyou get pulled over by police. I was pulled over by a police officer while driving in Iowa. It was one week afterI had arrived in the USA for the first time. I had accidentally made a minor mistake disobeying a traffic sign. Back home in Australia it's considered polite to get out of your car and walk over to the police officer's car and hand him your license so he doesn't have to get out of his seat. I wanted to be extra polite so I immediately jumped out of my car and walked towards his car while reaching into my back pocket. I'm lucky to be alive. If you come from a gun-free country like the UK or Australia you don't have any natural instinct for gun culture. You don't realize that police assume that everyone is armed. Things got immediately serious. The police officer's hand went to his weapon and I responded by dropping to my knees with my hands up. He yelled a bunch of things at me but my memory is vague because my heartbeat was suddenly pulsing in my ears blotting out all sound. I don't know if he drew his weapon or not. I was staring intently at the ground, shaking and trying to project non- threatening vibes. My next memory is that there were three police cars around me and a bunch of cops who'd been called for backup. They were all keeping their hands close to their guns. After some time passed (a minute? 30 minutes?I have no idea) the tensions de-escalated and they told me to get up. I gave the officer my license and tried to explain why I'd approached him. It was completely incomprehensible to him that there was a place where people don't fear cops and vice versa at traffic stops. It was as though I was trying to tell him that I came from Narnia and our cops were all talking animals. I've spoken to several British people, New Zealanders, and Australians who have shared almost identical stories. They really need to put signs up in all major US airports. Don't get out of your car if stopped by police. They will assume you are armed and they might shoot you. fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some things change when you shift countries. Keep the changes in mind. Whenever I see this I wonder what the gun guys think about it.
explain: What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA?
 Charlie Knoles, I have lived in 5 countries and am an Aussie expat in
 the USA
 Answered 2d ago
 +
 Don't get out of your car ifyou get pulled over by police.
 I was pulled over by a police officer while driving in Iowa. It was one week afterI
 had arrived in the USA for the first time. I had accidentally made a minor
 mistake disobeying a traffic sign. Back home in Australia it's considered polite to
 get out of your car and walk over to the police officer's car and hand him your
 license so he doesn't have to get out of his seat. I wanted to be extra polite so I
 immediately jumped out of my car and walked towards his car while reaching
 into my back pocket.
 I'm lucky to be alive.
 If you come from a gun-free country like the UK or Australia you don't have any
 natural instinct for gun culture. You don't realize that police assume that
 everyone is armed.
 Things got immediately serious. The police officer's hand went to his weapon
 and I responded by dropping to my knees with my hands up. He yelled a bunch
 of things at me but my memory is vague because my heartbeat was suddenly
 pulsing in my ears blotting out all sound. I don't know if he drew his weapon or
 not. I was staring intently at the ground, shaking and trying to project non-
 threatening vibes. My next memory is that there were three police cars around
 me and a bunch of cops who'd been called for backup. They were all keeping
 their hands close to their guns. After some time passed (a minute? 30 minutes?I
 have no idea) the tensions de-escalated and they told me to get up. I gave the
 officer my license and tried to explain why I'd approached him. It was completely
 incomprehensible to him that there was a place where people don't fear cops and
 vice versa at traffic stops. It was as though I was trying to tell him that I came
 from Narnia and our cops were all talking animals.
 I've spoken to several British people, New Zealanders, and Australians who have
 shared almost identical stories. They really need to put signs up in all major US
 airports.
 Don't get out of your car if stopped by police. They will assume you are
 armed and they might shoot you.
fierceawakening:
adelmortescryche:
Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some things change when you shift countries. Keep the changes in mind. 

Whenever I see this I wonder what the gun guys think about it.

fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some...

explain: Saving Your Grades From A Mental Health Crisis What To Do Before, During, And After by SmartStudy.tumblr.com IF YOUR GRADES ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER CONTACT YOUR TEACHERS This should be the first thing you do when you realise you're in crisis. Email them, and explain your situation in short, professional terms. You do not have to include details about your condition. "I have a mental health condition" should suffice as to the nature of the issue. Tell them that you are going to arrange to see a medical professional as soon as possible, and ask what process you should go through to defer/get an extension on assessment, and if they can help you in any way. Other people you may have to contact or CC in the email (depending on your school): University High School Head of House Class Coordinator Faculty/School Admin Disability Advisor Grade Coordinator Head of Department Academic Admin Counsellor School Counsellor Student Advocate BOOK A DOCTOR/THERAPIST APPOINTMENT ASAP This will be the person who can vouch for you the most. It's best if you have seen them before and they know you. If you can't get an appointment within a few days, call them and email them (if you haven't seen them before this will not work). Make sure to check out what counselling your university or school offers. During this appointment, the priority is to make a plan to get you back on your feet. This effort will not be useful if you stay a mess. Once you've figured that out, get two things from this person. One is a medical certificate/letter stating that you have, in fact, been going through this crisis. Second is a letter that describes the nature of the crisis, what treatment you're going through, and which people to contact (psychiatrists, etc.) who can vouch for this. Note: The reason I say to get two letters is because there is still a huge stigma around mental illness, and you don't want to reveal that you've got a disorder that's highly stigmatised, only to have it come back and bite you in the ass later. Don't provide details unless it's necessary or asked for. A STUDENT KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AS Most schools and institutions will have a list of a student's rights and responsibilities online. Look them up. Know what your rights are as a student. Also look to see if there are state/national laws protecting you, or if your school is a part of a network of schools that has its own code. Some people working in schools still think mental health issues are trivial, and you never know when they're going to ignore a rule to suit themselves. Make sure you can pick on this if it happens to you. Pretty much all schools will have protection in place for students with mental illnesses and disabilities, so even if you a miss a deadline for a form or make another mistake, they should take your exceptional circumstances into account. This is where a student or disability advisor from school can help you. ottom IF YOU HAVEN'T REACHED CRISIS YET TALK TO A DOCTOR/THERAPIST/COUNSELLOR/TRUSTED ADULT If you're going through a hard time, talk to someone who can help you. Any trusted adult or professional can help you get back on your feet before it's too late, or refer you to someone who can. If it's a new issue, you'll have to see someone like a GP who can refer you to a therapist or mental health service. Talk to them about what's been happening, and say that you need help. Sometimes, even talking about the problem can help you feel better. In these situations, they can also help you figure out what you can do at school to catch up/get special help. FIGURE OUT HOW TO STUDY WHILE IN A BAD STATE Even if you're getting help, it might be some time before you're fully back on track. In these instances, try to make the best of a bad situation. Can't leave the house? Access lecture recordings and eBooks. Ask your friends to send you their notes, or ask the teacher if you can submit your homework via email, or through a friend. Have trouble concentrating? Figure out how long you can study without needing a break, and make a schedule around that. Always make sure to ask your teachers if they can help you with this. Whether it be slightly changing the requirements or conditions of a piece of assessment, or simply their understanding that you may not be able to attend perfectly, it can make a big difference with your overall marks. If they don't know you're struggling, they can't help! DON'T PUSH YOURSELF OR OVERTHINK When you realise there's an issue, it's easy to fall into panic or try to power through. Don't do this. It'll just make you more stressed and aggravate the existing problems, which will make things much worse in the long run. Though it's hard to believe sometimes, your health and mental health are more important than your grades. You can't ignore your mind when it's screaming at you that something is wrong. Listen to it, and be easy on yourself. The best way to get back to your full potential to ask for help and give yourself what you need. Take a break when you need one and practise self-care. It's more important than you might things. RECOVERING FROM A BREAKDOWN ACCEPT THAT YOU'VE BEEN THROUGH SOMETHING MAJOR Once the worst has passed, some people try to brush it off and pretend it never happened. They can feel ashamed or embarrassed about what they went through. However, there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about, especially if you had a pre-existing mental health condition. Every life has ups and downs and just because yours were a bit more serious than some people's, it doesn't mean that you're weak somehow. The best thing you can do for yourself is to recognise what happened, and work to prevent it from happening again by setting up crisis plans and support networks. GET TUTORING TO CATCH UP If you've fallen behind, don't worry. There are plenty of ways to catch yourself up and get back on track. The best way is to hire a tutor. They can guide you through the work, help you understand difficult concepts, and identify the places you need more help. Yes, tutors can be expensive, but there's a way to get around this. See if there is anyone who took your class the year before who might be willing to tutor you for an hour each week for a discounted prince. Similarly, see if there are any students who can help you in exchange for something like instrument lessons. And if any of your friends are academically gifted, I'm sure they'd be able to help. If all else fails, go to office hours and any free tutoring sessions your school or university offers. Do some research, ask around, see what's there. PACE YOURSELF AND DON'T RUSH IN After a breakdown or crisis, you may be tempted to throw yourself back into your work to catch up. Don't! You'll become overwhelmed and end up back at square one. Remember, you've just been through a very difficult situation and you're not going to get better overnight. Ease yourself in. I definitely recommend starting with a reduced or part-time study load if possible. Remember that you may not be back at your full capacity just yet, and difficulties concentrating and being motivated could make things hard. By starting off slowly, you're able to get used to studying again without too much pressure. DEVELOP A ROUTINE Yes, this advice is in every piece of study advice ever, but you shouldn't develop just any routine. Develop one that allows you plenty of breaks and takes into consider any issues you may have with fatigue or focusing. If your breakdown was caused by overwork, make sure this one is easier on you. Things to include you could include in a healthy routine (but don't micromanage!): "I feel crap" time* Breaks and meals Plenty of sleep and rest "You" time (treat yo self) Time to plan for the next week Exercise (have you tried yoga? Kidding) Meditation/mindfulness Friend/family social time * Remember that the thoughts and feelings caused by mental illness are not shameful, and ignoring and forcing them down will only make them worse. If you need to lie in bed feeling miserable, do it. THINGS TO REMEMBER DON'T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS It can be easy to look at other people and see your own flaws, but it's important to try not to. Every person has different experiences and struggles, so it's not fair to yourself to look at someone without yours and think you're behind in some way. Taking longer to complete your studies isn't shameful. Making mistakes isn't shameful. Needing breaks isn't shameful. You'll get where you need to be in the end. Have patience. GRADES DON'T DEFINE YOU I spent so much of my life thinking my only worth came from my academic success. And guess what? This just led to more anxiety and depression. It's important to realise that things like grades, class rankings, GPAS, and "intelligence" aren't that important. Who you are and what you do is far more important than these arbitrary labels. THERE IS A STIGMA, SO BE PREPARED It's an unfortunate reality, but there is still a stigma against mental health issues and there is a chance it might affect your experiences while dealing with administrative staff and teachers. There have been stories about people telling their people supposed to be guiding them that they have mental health issues, and being dismissed because "it's a girl issue" or "it's all in their head". Be prepared in case this happens to you. Remind people that it's a medical condition and that you can get proof from medical professionals if need be. Plus, there is probably something in your school's policies or even the law that protects you when you have a mental illness. Remember that just because people are ignorant, that doesn't mean your issue is not 100% real and important. Don't let these people make you feel worse. YOU CAN DO THIS In our darkest moments, it can be hard to believe that we're capable of immense strength, but I promise you we are. Whatever obstacle is in your path right now - even if it's your brain chemistry - you are going to get through this. You've made it through every worst day you've had so far. You've made it through the dark and scary moments, and you've come out the other end stronger and wiser. Remember that you are strong, and even when you don't feel like it, there is always support available to help you realise that strength again. tmblimteom apricot-studies: smartstudy: Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot with mental health, and so I have been through a lot of breakdowns. So many that I actually dropped out of university after 3 weeks in 2016 and had to take the whole year off. Because of this, I’ve made it my mission to help others with mental health issues as much as I can, so you don’t have to go through what I’ve been through. Anyway, here is my guide. I tried to keep it general, and actually useful. If you have any questions or additions please feel free to add them. And as ever, if you want to talk to me about studying with mental illness or want to see a post on a specific topic, please feel free to message me. thank you so much for this
explain: Saving Your Grades From
 A Mental Health Crisis
 What To Do Before, During, And After
 by SmartStudy.tumblr.com

 IF YOUR GRADES ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER
 CONTACT YOUR TEACHERS
 This should be the first thing you do when you realise you're in crisis. Email them, and explain your
 situation in short, professional terms. You do not have to include details about your condition. "I have
 a mental health condition" should suffice as to the nature of the issue.
 Tell them that you are going to arrange to see a medical professional as soon as possible, and ask what
 process you should go through to defer/get an extension on assessment, and if they can help you in
 any way.
 Other people you may have to contact or CC in the email (depending on your school):
 University
 High School
 Head of House
 Class Coordinator
 Faculty/School Admin
 Disability Advisor
 Grade Coordinator
 Head of Department
 Academic Admin
 Counsellor
 School Counsellor
 Student Advocate
 BOOK A DOCTOR/THERAPIST APPOINTMENT ASAP
 This will be the person who can vouch for you the most. It's best if you have seen them before and
 they know you. If you can't get an appointment within a few days, call them and email them (if you
 haven't seen them before this will not work). Make sure to check out what counselling your university
 or school offers.
 During this appointment, the priority is to make a plan to get you back on your feet. This effort will
 not be useful if you stay a mess. Once you've figured that out, get two things from this person. One is
 a medical certificate/letter stating that you have, in fact, been going through this crisis. Second is a
 letter that describes the nature of the crisis, what treatment you're going through, and which people
 to contact (psychiatrists, etc.) who can vouch for this.
 Note: The reason I say to get two letters is because there is still a huge stigma around mental illness,
 and you don't want to reveal that you've got a disorder that's highly stigmatised, only to have it come
 back and bite you in the ass later. Don't provide details unless it's necessary or asked for.
 A STUDENT
 KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AS
 Most schools and institutions will have a list of a student's rights and responsibilities online. Look them
 up. Know what your rights are as a student. Also look to see if there are state/national laws protecting
 you, or if your school is a part of a network of schools that has its own code. Some people working in
 schools still think mental health issues are trivial, and you never know when they're going to ignore a
 rule to suit themselves. Make sure you can pick on this if it happens to you.
 Pretty much all schools will have protection in place for students with mental illnesses and disabilities,
 so even if you a miss a deadline for a form or make another mistake, they should take your exceptional
 circumstances into account. This is where a student or disability advisor from school can help you.
 ottom

 IF YOU HAVEN'T REACHED CRISIS YET
 TALK TO A DOCTOR/THERAPIST/COUNSELLOR/TRUSTED ADULT
 If you're going through a hard time, talk to someone who can help you. Any trusted adult or
 professional can help you get back on your feet before it's too late, or refer you to someone who can.
 If it's a new issue, you'll have to see someone like a GP who can refer you to a therapist or mental
 health service.
 Talk to them about what's been happening, and say that you need help. Sometimes, even talking
 about the problem can help you feel better. In these situations, they can also help you figure out what
 you can do at school to catch up/get special help.
 FIGURE OUT HOW TO STUDY WHILE IN A BAD STATE
 Even if you're getting help, it might be some time before you're fully back on track. In these instances,
 try to make the best of a bad situation.
 Can't leave the house? Access lecture recordings and eBooks. Ask your friends to send you their notes,
 or ask the teacher if you can submit your homework via email, or through a friend. Have trouble
 concentrating? Figure out how long you can study without needing a break, and make a schedule
 around that.
 Always make sure to ask your teachers if they can help you with this. Whether it be slightly changing
 the requirements or conditions of a piece of assessment, or simply their understanding that you may
 not be able to attend perfectly, it can make a big difference with your overall marks. If they don't know
 you're struggling, they can't help!
 DON'T PUSH YOURSELF OR OVERTHINK
 When you realise there's an issue, it's easy to fall into panic or try to power through. Don't do this. It'll
 just make you more stressed and aggravate the existing problems, which will make things much worse
 in the long run.
 Though it's hard to believe sometimes, your health and mental health are more important than your
 grades. You can't ignore your mind when it's screaming at you that something is wrong. Listen to it,
 and be easy on yourself.
 The best way to get back to your full potential to ask for help and give yourself what you need. Take a
 break when you need one and practise self-care. It's more important than you might things.

 RECOVERING FROM A BREAKDOWN
 ACCEPT THAT YOU'VE BEEN THROUGH SOMETHING MAJOR
 Once the worst has passed, some people try to brush it off and pretend it never happened. They can
 feel ashamed or embarrassed about what they went through. However, there is absolutely nothing to
 be ashamed or embarrassed about, especially if you had a pre-existing mental health condition. Every
 life has ups and downs and just because yours were a bit more serious than some people's, it doesn't
 mean that you're weak somehow.
 The best thing you can do for yourself is to recognise what happened, and work to prevent it from
 happening again by setting up crisis plans and support networks.
 GET TUTORING TO CATCH UP
 If you've fallen behind, don't worry. There are plenty of ways to catch yourself up and get back on
 track. The best way is to hire a tutor. They can guide you through the work, help you understand
 difficult concepts, and identify the places you need more help.
 Yes, tutors can be expensive, but there's a way to get around this. See if there is anyone who took
 your class the year before who might be willing to tutor you for an hour each week for a discounted
 prince. Similarly, see if there are any students who can help you in exchange for something like
 instrument lessons. And if any of your friends are academically gifted, I'm sure they'd be able to help.
 If all else fails, go to office hours and any free tutoring sessions your school or university offers. Do
 some research, ask around, see what's there.
 PACE YOURSELF AND DON'T RUSH IN
 After a breakdown or crisis, you may be tempted to throw yourself back into your work to catch up.
 Don't! You'll become overwhelmed and end up back at square one. Remember, you've just been
 through a very difficult situation and you're not going to get better overnight.
 Ease yourself in. I definitely recommend starting with a reduced or part-time study load if possible.
 Remember that you may not be back at your full capacity just yet, and difficulties concentrating and
 being motivated could make things hard. By starting off slowly, you're able to get used to studying
 again without too much pressure.
 DEVELOP A ROUTINE
 Yes, this advice is in every piece of study advice ever, but you shouldn't develop just any routine.
 Develop one that allows you plenty of breaks and takes into consider any issues you may have with
 fatigue or focusing. If your breakdown was caused by overwork, make sure this one is easier on you.
 Things to include you could include in a healthy routine (but don't micromanage!):
 "I feel crap" time*
 Breaks and meals
 Plenty of sleep and rest
 "You" time (treat yo self)
 Time to plan for the next week
 Exercise (have you tried yoga? Kidding)
 Meditation/mindfulness
 Friend/family social time
 * Remember that the thoughts and feelings caused by mental illness are not shameful, and ignoring
 and forcing them down will only make them worse. If you need to lie in bed feeling miserable, do it.

 THINGS TO REMEMBER
 DON'T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS
 It can be easy to look at other people and see your own flaws, but it's important to try not to. Every
 person has different experiences and struggles, so it's not fair to yourself to look at someone without
 yours and think you're behind in some way.
 Taking longer to complete your studies isn't shameful. Making mistakes isn't shameful. Needing
 breaks isn't shameful. You'll get where you need to be in the end. Have patience.
 GRADES DON'T DEFINE YOU
 I spent so much of my life thinking my only worth came from my academic success. And guess what?
 This just led to more anxiety and depression. It's important to realise that things like grades, class
 rankings, GPAS, and "intelligence" aren't that important. Who you are and what you do is far more
 important than these arbitrary labels.
 THERE IS A STIGMA, SO BE PREPARED
 It's an unfortunate reality, but there is still a stigma against mental health issues and there is a chance
 it might affect your experiences while dealing with administrative staff and teachers. There have been
 stories about people telling their people supposed to be guiding them that they have mental health
 issues, and being dismissed because "it's a girl issue" or "it's all in their head".
 Be prepared in case this happens to you. Remind people that it's a medical condition and that you can
 get proof from medical professionals if need be. Plus, there is probably something in your school's
 policies or even the law that protects you when you have a mental illness.
 Remember that just because people are ignorant, that doesn't mean your issue is not 100% real and
 important. Don't let these people make you feel worse.
 YOU CAN DO THIS
 In our darkest moments, it can be hard to believe that we're capable of immense strength, but I
 promise you we are. Whatever obstacle is in your path right now - even if it's your brain chemistry -
 you are going to get through this.
 You've made it through every worst day you've had so far. You've made it through the dark and scary
 moments, and you've come out the other end stronger and wiser.
 Remember that you are strong, and even when you don't feel like it, there is always support available
 to help you realise that strength again.
 tmblimteom
apricot-studies:
smartstudy:

Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot with mental health, and so I have been through a lot of breakdowns. So many that I actually dropped out of university after 3 weeks in 2016 and had to take the whole year off. Because of this, I’ve made it my mission to help others with mental health issues as much as I can, so you don’t have to go through what I’ve been through.
Anyway, here is my guide. I tried to keep it general, and actually useful. If you have any questions or additions please feel free to add them. 
And as ever, if you want to talk to me about studying with mental illness or want to see a post on a specific topic, please feel free to message me. 

thank you so much for this

apricot-studies: smartstudy: Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot...