Are
Are

Are

Should
Should

Should

Needs
Needs

Needs

Paper Cut
Paper Cut

Paper Cut

Caught
Caught

Caught

Credit
Credit

Credit

exact-same-thing
exact-same-thing

exact-same-thing

fell down
 fell down

fell down

aging
 aging

aging

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Animals, Beautiful, and Church: goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeadofflandersfields: Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window. @birdblogwhichisforbirds @snitling EXACTLY This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes. This is a work of beautiful defiance. Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery. The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it! From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them.  Reblogging for this beautiful addition. [ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]
Animals, Beautiful, and Church: goosegoblin:
theramseyloft:

jurassicjenday:


theramseyloft:

tinysaurus-rex:


iwilltrytobereasonable:

cant-hug-every-human:

thedeadofflandersfields:
Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window.
@birdblogwhichisforbirds


@snitling EXACTLY


This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. 


The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes.
This is a work of beautiful defiance.
Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery.

The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it!
From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them. 


Reblogging for this beautiful addition.

[ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]

goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeadoffl...

Club, God, and Love: This legitimately upsets me. Y'see, now, y'see, I'm looking at this, thinking, squares fit together better than circles, so, say, if you wanted a box of donuts, a full box, you could probably fit more square donuts in than circle donuts if the circumference of the circle touched the each of the comers of the square donut. So you might end up with more donuts. But then I also think... Does the square or round donut have a greater donut volume? Is the number of donuts better than the entire donut mass as a whole? Hrm. HRM. A round donut with radius R1 occupies the same space as a square donut with side 2R1. If the center circle of a round donut has a radius R2 and the hole ofa square donut has a side 2R2, then the area of a round donut is nR12 nr22. The area of a square donut would be then 4R12 4R22. This doesn't say much, but in general and throwing numbers, a full box of square donuts has more donut per donut than a full box of round donuts. The interesting thing is knowing exactly how much more donut per donut we have. Assuming first a small center hole (R2 R1/4) and replacing in the proper expressions, we have a 27,6% more donut in the square one (Round: 15nR12/16 2,94R12, square: 15R12/4 3,75R12). Now, assuming a large center hole (R2 3R1/4 ) we have a 27,7 % more donut in the square one (Round: 7nR12/16 1,37R12, square: 7R12/4 1,75R12). This tells us that, approximately, well have a 27% bigger donut if it's square than if it's round. ddr: Square donuts have a 27 % more donut per donut in the same space as a round one. god i love this site laughoutloud-club: Who doesn’t love 27% more donut
Club, God, and Love: This legitimately upsets me.
 Y'see, now, y'see, I'm looking at this, thinking, squares fit
 together better than circles, so, say, if you wanted a box of donuts,
 a full box, you could probably fit more square donuts in than circle
 donuts if the circumference of the circle touched the each of the
 comers of the square donut.
 So you might end up with more donuts.
 But then I also think... Does the square or round donut have a
 greater donut volume? Is the number of donuts better than the
 entire donut mass as a whole?
 Hrm.
 HRM.
 A round donut with radius R1 occupies the same space as a square
 donut with side 2R1. If the center circle of a round donut has a radius
 R2 and the hole ofa square donut has a side 2R2, then the area of a
 round donut is nR12 nr22. The area of a square donut would be then
 4R12 4R22. This doesn't say much, but in general and throwing
 numbers, a full box of square donuts has more donut per donut than a
 full box of round donuts.
 The interesting thing is knowing exactly how much more donut per
 donut we have. Assuming first a small center hole (R2 R1/4) and
 replacing in the proper expressions, we have a 27,6% more donut in
 the square one (Round: 15nR12/16 2,94R12, square: 15R12/4
 3,75R12). Now, assuming a large center hole (R2 3R1/4 ) we have a
 27,7 % more donut in the square one (Round: 7nR12/16 1,37R12,
 square: 7R12/4 1,75R12). This tells us that, approximately, well
 have a 27% bigger donut if it's square than if it's round.
 ddr: Square donuts have a 27 % more donut per donut in the same
 space as a round one.
 god i love this site
laughoutloud-club:

Who doesn’t love 27% more donut

laughoutloud-club: Who doesn’t love 27% more donut

Apparently, College, and Complex: r/AskReddit What perfectly true story of yours sounds like an outrageous lie? RamsesThePigeon 13d, 17h Just up the street from my apartment in San Francisco, there was one of those fast food restaurants that was either a KFC or a Taco Bell, depending on the angle from which it was viewed. The establishment was a frequent stopping point for students coming from the nearby college... and those students were a frequent target for a remarkably bright crow Now, on most days, the bird in question would just hang around the restaurant (as well as other ones nearby) and scavenge for scraps. Every once in a while, though - I saw this happen twice, and had it happen to me once - it would enact a much more complex scheme than simply going through the gutter: The crow had apparently discovered that money could be exchanged for food, so it would wait until it saw a likely mark, squawk at them to get their attention, then pick up and drop a coin. Anyone who responded would witness the bird hopping a few feet away, then following its "victim" toward the source of its next snack. When the crow approached me, it dropped a nickel on the ground. I stooped, picked up the coin, and then jumped slightly when the bird made a noise that sounded not unlike "Taco!' Needless to say, I bought that crow a taco. The final out-of-pocket cost for me, minus the nickel, was something like >l.T5. Even so, I figured a bird that smart deserved a reward simply for existing Of course, that was probably exactly what I was supposed to think. TL;DR: A crow paid me five cents to buy it a taco. onyourleftbooob: nadiaoxford: I don’t have a hard time believing this.
Apparently, College, and Complex: r/AskReddit
 What perfectly true story of yours sounds like
 an outrageous lie?

 RamsesThePigeon 13d, 17h
 Just up the street from my apartment in San Francisco,
 there was one of those fast food restaurants that was
 either a KFC or a Taco Bell, depending on the angle from
 which it was viewed. The establishment was a frequent
 stopping point for students coming from the nearby
 college... and those students were a frequent target for a
 remarkably bright crow
 Now, on most days, the bird in question would just hang
 around the restaurant (as well as other ones nearby) and
 scavenge for scraps. Every once in a while, though - I saw
 this happen twice, and had it happen to me once - it would
 enact a much more complex scheme than simply going
 through the gutter: The crow had apparently discovered
 that money could be exchanged for food, so it would wait
 until it saw a likely mark, squawk at them to get their
 attention, then pick up and drop a coin. Anyone who
 responded would witness the bird hopping a few feet
 away, then following its "victim" toward the source of its
 next snack.
 When the crow approached me, it dropped a nickel on the
 ground. I stooped, picked up the coin, and then jumped
 slightly when the bird made a noise that sounded not
 unlike "Taco!'
 Needless to say, I bought that crow a taco.
 The final out-of-pocket cost for me, minus the nickel, was
 something like >l.T5. Even so, I figured a bird that smart
 deserved a reward simply for existing
 Of course, that was probably exactly what I was supposed
 to think.
 TL;DR: A crow paid me five cents to buy it a taco.
onyourleftbooob:

nadiaoxford:
I don’t have a hard time believing this.

onyourleftbooob: nadiaoxford: I don’t have a hard time believing this.