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This Is A Joke
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🔥 | Latest

Emerged: My sister has been pushing herself in her fitness goals recently, but a desperate plea emerged last week.
Emerged: My sister has been pushing herself in her fitness goals recently, but a desperate plea emerged last week.

My sister has been pushing herself in her fitness goals recently, but a desperate plea emerged last week.

Emerged: omgcheckplease: ★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergraduate at Yale. One of the college’s traditional songs—which they strategically have students sing during their first weeks as Yalies and then again at the moment we’re conferred our degrees—goes like this:Bright College years, with pleasure rife,The shortest, gladdest years of life;How swiftly are ye gliding by!Oh, why doth time so quickly fly?Et cetera. The first time you sing it, you mumble the words and don’t know a single person around you. The last time you sing it, wearing the mortarboard and gown, you’ve got the lyrics memorized and you’re surrounded by some of the most important people in your life.That summer, with “How bright will seem, through mem’ry’s haze/ Those happy, golden, bygone days!” still ringing in my ears, I started CHECK, PLEASE. The comic’s first panels emerged on an ancient laptop, through a borrowed bamboo tablet, and on a free drawing program called gnu-IMPShop. I had no plan. I wanted to explore my newfound fascination with hockey and share silly cartoons on Tumblr. But unconsciously, I also wanted to pour the nostalgia of those bright college years into the Haus, Faber, Samwell, and Bitty’s story. I wanted to bottle up those moments where we grow and change and fall down and pick ourselves back up. Drawing CHECK, PLEASE was how I revisited those experiences and how I sifted through the bittersweet feeling of concluding something I loved. Perhaps this is why finishing CHECK, PLEASE calls back those same emotions. Just as Bitty would bake affection into a pie, I might have encoded into CHECK, PLEASE the heartfelt fondness I had for my time in college, the love of the friends I made there, and the gratitude I have for my own growth.I have always found it easier to express gratitude face to face. And even though I would not have gotten to meet all of you, the greatest downside of being unable to participate in a book tour is that I can’t say thanks in person. I could write a thousand words, yet they couldn’t replace a high five at a bookstore signing or a handshake at a convention. I could write the blog post to end all blog posts, but it’s not the same as yelling with you about an episode or chatting about a fandom we both happen be in. For me, it’s those moments that somehow equate to my abundant appreciation for you, the reader.I look forward to the day when I can let my actions speak louder than my words!In the meantime: thank you. I am incredibly blessed to get to create a story and then share it. This is all I want to do in life. These characters get to have a readership overflowing with love and enthusiasm for them. This comic, somehow, has found ambassadors. This story gets to be told. Thank you! I’m excited to share with you the unusual, fun, and hopeful narratives I’m working hard to develop.So with that, I’ll sign off on the last blog post! Thank you for reading this comic. Thank you for sharing it with friends. Thank you for caring about Bitty’s story and CHECK, PLEASE.Thank you!John J. Johnson.Just kidding, it’s Ngozi. :^) Tee hee. Bye now!
Emerged: omgcheckplease:

★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergraduate at Yale. One of the college’s traditional songs—which they strategically have students sing during their first weeks as Yalies and then again at the moment we’re conferred our degrees—goes like this:Bright College years, with pleasure rife,The shortest, gladdest years of life;How swiftly are ye gliding by!Oh, why doth time so quickly fly?Et cetera. The first time you sing it, you mumble the words and don’t know a single person around you. The last time you sing it, wearing the mortarboard and gown, you’ve got the lyrics memorized and you’re surrounded by some of the most important people in your life.That summer, with “How bright will seem, through mem’ry’s haze/ Those happy, golden, bygone days!” still ringing in my ears, I started CHECK, PLEASE. The comic’s first panels emerged on an ancient laptop, through a borrowed bamboo tablet, and on a free drawing program called gnu-IMPShop. I had no plan. I wanted to explore my newfound fascination with hockey and share silly cartoons on Tumblr. But unconsciously, I also wanted to pour the nostalgia of those bright college years into the Haus, Faber, Samwell, and Bitty’s story. I wanted to bottle up those moments where we grow and change and fall down and pick ourselves back up. Drawing CHECK, PLEASE was how I revisited those experiences and how I sifted through the bittersweet feeling of concluding something I loved. Perhaps this is why finishing CHECK, PLEASE calls back those same emotions. Just as Bitty would bake affection into a pie, I might have encoded into CHECK, PLEASE the heartfelt fondness I had for my time in college, the love of the friends I made there, and the gratitude I have for my own growth.I have always found it easier to express gratitude face to face. And even though I would not have gotten to meet all of you, the greatest downside of being unable to participate in a book tour is that I can’t say thanks in person. I could write a thousand words, yet they couldn’t replace a high five at a bookstore signing or a handshake at a convention. I could write the blog post to end all blog posts, but it’s not the same as yelling with you about an episode or chatting about a fandom we both happen be in. For me, it’s those moments that somehow equate to my abundant appreciation for you, the reader.I look forward to the day when I can let my actions speak louder than my words!In the meantime: thank you. I am incredibly blessed to get to create a story and then share it. This is all I want to do in life. These characters get to have a readership overflowing with love and enthusiasm for them. This comic, somehow, has found ambassadors. This story gets to be told. Thank you! I’m excited to share with you the unusual, fun, and hopeful narratives I’m working hard to develop.So with that, I’ll sign off on the last blog post! Thank you for reading this comic. Thank you for sharing it with friends. Thank you for caring about Bitty’s story and CHECK, PLEASE.Thank you!John J. Johnson.Just kidding, it’s Ngozi. :^) Tee hee. Bye now!

omgcheckplease: ★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergr...

Emerged: votgs lady-feral "The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50 pounds of pots rated an "A", 40 pounds a "B", and so on Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one pot albeit a perfect one to get an "A" Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay." Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety) Perfection is intimidating. I think most artists blocks come from the fear of creating something imperfect. (via buttastic) putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually itl be good shit. maybe most of it will just be shit but you can't make good shit if you're not making a lot of shit. GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS. (via aintgotnoladytronblues) Kind of important. Ive spent way too much of my life thinking about the perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things. 26,336 notes
Emerged: votgs lady-feral
 "The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing
 the class into two groups.
 All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely
 on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on
 its quality.
 His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in
 his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50
 pounds of pots rated an "A", 40 pounds a "B", and so on
 Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only
 one pot albeit a perfect one to get an "A"
 Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of
 highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for
 quantity
 It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles
 of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had
 sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show
 for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay."
 Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety)
 Perfection is intimidating. I think most artists blocks come from the fear of
 creating something imperfect.
 (via buttastic)
 putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually itl be good shit.
 maybe most of it will just be shit but you can't make good shit if you're not
 making a lot of shit.
 GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS.
 (via aintgotnoladytronblues)
 Kind of important. Ive spent way too much of my life thinking about the
 perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things.
 26,336 notes

Emerged: @ryanlcooper 29m ryan cooper extremely 2019: school active shooter which scare the piss out of students and, lets be real, are 100 percent worthless safety-wise, are now a big and growing industry When Active-Shooter Drills Scare the Children They Hope to Protect As fears about mass shootings rise, school preparedness programs include some "completely stupid" scare tactics, child trauma experts s... nytimes.com 9 4 tl39 86 ryan cooper @ryanlcooper Following a bunch of ex-cop and ex-military oafs are making BANK giving kids PTSD on an industrial scale. capitalism: it's good Nearly every American public school now conducts lockdown drills -96 percent in 2015 and 2016 - according to the Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics. Law enforcement officials and many school administrators say they are crucial for preparing and safeguarding students, but methods vary widely and now include drills that child trauma experts say do little more than terrify already anxious children. "A whole new cottage industry has emerged where people who don't know anything about kids are jumping in and adapting protocols for groups like police officers or people preparing for combat," said Bruce D. Perry, founder of the ChildTrauma Academy, whose clinical team assists maltreated and traumatized children through counseling, research and education. As a result, Dr. Perry said in an interview, "The number of developmentally uninformed, child- uninformed and completely stupid ideas is mind-numbing."
Emerged: @ryanlcooper 29m
 ryan cooper
 extremely 2019: school active shooter which scare the piss out of students and,
 lets be real, are 100 percent worthless safety-wise, are now a big and growing
 industry
 When Active-Shooter Drills Scare the Children They Hope to Protect
 As fears about mass shootings rise, school preparedness programs include
 some "completely stupid" scare tactics, child trauma experts s...
 nytimes.com
 9 4
 tl39
 86

 ryan cooper
 @ryanlcooper
 Following
 a bunch of ex-cop and ex-military oafs
 are making BANK giving kids PTSD on an
 industrial scale. capitalism: it's good
 Nearly every American public school now conducts lockdown drills
 -96 percent in 2015 and 2016 - according to the Education
 Department's National Center for Education Statistics. Law
 enforcement officials and many school administrators say they are
 crucial for preparing and safeguarding students, but methods vary
 widely and now include drills that child trauma experts say do little
 more than terrify already anxious children.
 "A whole new cottage industry has emerged where people who don't
 know anything about kids are jumping in and adapting protocols
 for groups like police officers or people preparing for combat," said
 Bruce D. Perry, founder of the ChildTrauma Academy, whose
 clinical team assists maltreated and traumatized children through
 counseling, research and education. As a result, Dr. Perry said in an
 interview, "The number of developmentally uninformed, child-
 uninformed and completely stupid ideas is mind-numbing."
Emerged: votgs lady-feral+ The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50 pounds of pots rated an "A", 4o pounds a "B", and so on. Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one potalbeit a perfect one-to get an "A". Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay." Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety) Perfection is intimidating. think most artists blocks come from the fear of creating something imperfect. (via buttastic) putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually it'll be good shit. maybe most of it will just be shitl but you can't make good shit if you're not making a lot of shit. GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS (via aintgotnoladytronblues) Kind of important. I've spent way too much of my life thinking about the perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things 26,336 notes Just keep making shit.
Emerged: votgs lady-feral+
 The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing
 the class into two groups.
 All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely
 on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on
 its quality
 His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in
 his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50
 pounds of pots rated an "A", 4o pounds a "B", and so on.
 Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only
 one potalbeit a perfect one-to get an "A".
 Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of
 highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for
 quantity
 It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles
 of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had
 sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show
 for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay."
 Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety)
 Perfection is intimidating. think most artists blocks come from the fear of
 creating something imperfect.
 (via buttastic)
 putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually it'll be good shit.
 maybe most of it will just be shitl but you can't make good shit if you're not
 making a lot of shit.
 GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS
 (via aintgotnoladytronblues)
 Kind of important. I've spent way too much of my life thinking about the
 perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things
 26,336 notes
Just keep making shit.

Just keep making shit.

Emerged: do older generations not get fatalistic humor?? like the other day my friend's parents were hanging around and we were joking and ¡ W:as like "well no matter what i can always fling myself off the nearest cliff and they didn't laugh then later the mom pulled me aside and was like "maybe you should get some help, sweetie" like stfu?? help? in this I honestly don't think they get it as a coping mechanism, they think it's a cry for help rather i'd even say it's past just coping and is also now a category of Stuff Kids Got Used To When No One Was Looking; not everyone using that humor is even covering up something bigger, we just stopped thinking along the line, and most parents don't seem My boss opened a door and missed me by inches, he said whoops, almost killed you there!" My result of "Oh, if only. Led to an as the goddamn Addams Family and the Family that lives next door and runs away screaming at the end of the episode I will say that it's interesting because this kind of hurnor is very, very prevalent Which is honestly a place you would expect fatalistic humor to be common and used as a coping method. You're one "oops away from death on the flight deck, one inch to the left and you don't have a head anymone because the jet that just landed now owns it as a wing-tip decoration. So you joke about it because lowkey you're fucking terrified it'll happen, but you're also desensitized to the danger itself because you face it every single day for 12 hours at a time. Anyway so we all know the mindset you adopt in the military because of the danger so to realise that an identical sense of humor has been adopted by normal people should about the amount of stress modem young It was also common in previous generations that had to deal with say, war and economic One of my favorite movies is Singing In The Rain which came in out 1952, right on the tailcoat of two world wars and a looming cold one, and for all it's a cheery happy musical, it's got this really bleak witty humor too, things like call me a cab! "okay, you're a cab! or the scene where Don says he'll be homeless by the next day and Cosmo cheerfully tells him not to be ridiculous.. the bank bailiffs And then quite probably one of my favorite opening lines, where two young girls are watching Lina on screen and one says "She's so refined. I think I'll kill myself Which really resonates with a lot of the things we say now when talking about people we find personally attractive, meaning not only is fatalism not a new trend, but those two girls at the starting sequence of Singing In The Rain are totally there for Lina, not Don So it's almost as if you can use fatalist humor as a sort of social atmosphere barometer. If fatalist humors starts to become Maybe sometimes it will be obvious, like during war times or in potentially dangerous it's less obvious, like the younger generation's views of their future. Either way, from all the comments above, it seems to have somehow emerged as a reliable measure of how things this explains a lot
Emerged: do older generations not get fatalistic
 humor?? like the other day my friend's parents
 were hanging around and we were joking and
 ¡ W:as like "well no matter what i can always
 fling myself off the nearest cliff and they
 didn't laugh then later the mom pulled me
 aside and was like "maybe you should get
 some help, sweetie" like stfu?? help? in this
 I honestly don't think they get it as a coping
 mechanism, they think it's a cry for help rather
 i'd even say it's past just coping and is also
 now a category of Stuff Kids Got Used To
 When No One Was Looking; not everyone
 using that humor is even covering up
 something bigger, we just stopped thinking
 along the line, and most parents don't seem
 My boss opened a door and missed me by
 inches, he said whoops, almost killed you
 there!" My result of "Oh, if only. Led to an
 as the goddamn Addams Family and the
 Family that lives next door and runs away
 screaming at the end of the episode
 I will say that it's interesting because
 this kind of hurnor is very, very prevalent
 Which is honestly a place you would expect
 fatalistic humor to be common and used as
 a coping method. You're one "oops away
 from death on the flight deck, one inch to
 the left and you don't have a head anymone
 because the jet that just landed now owns it
 as a wing-tip decoration. So you joke about
 it because lowkey you're fucking terrified it'll
 happen, but you're also desensitized to the
 danger itself because you face it every single
 day for 12 hours at a time.
 Anyway so we all know the mindset you
 adopt in the military because of the danger
 so to realise that an identical sense of humor
 has been adopted by normal people should
 about the amount of stress modem young
 It was also common in previous generations
 that had to deal with say, war and economic
 One of my favorite movies is Singing In The
 Rain which came in out 1952, right on the
 tailcoat of two world wars and a looming cold
 one, and for all it's a cheery happy musical, it's
 got this really bleak witty humor too, things
 like call me a cab! "okay, you're a cab! or
 the scene where Don says he'll be homeless
 by the next day and Cosmo cheerfully tells
 him not to be ridiculous.. the bank bailiffs
 And then quite probably one of my favorite
 opening lines, where two young girls are
 watching Lina on screen and one says "She's
 so refined. I think I'll kill myself
 Which really resonates with a lot of the things
 we say now when talking about people we
 find personally attractive, meaning not only is
 fatalism not a new trend, but those two girls
 at the starting sequence of Singing In The
 Rain are totally there for Lina, not Don
 So it's almost as if you can use fatalist
 humor as a sort of social atmosphere
 barometer. If fatalist humors starts to become
 Maybe sometimes it will be obvious, like
 during war times or in potentially dangerous
 it's less obvious, like the younger generation's
 views of their future. Either way, from all the
 comments above, it seems to have somehow
 emerged as a reliable measure of how things
 this explains a lot

this explains a lot

Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit) posted to AskReddit 4 hours ago by nl1004 2303 comments sorted by top DONE HIDE A PREV NEXT V A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the room and stormed out. I told my parents what happened and they told his parents and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My family barely had enough money to get me the game for my birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never be able to play it again Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch Out. So my older brother went over to his house and switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome. A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness. When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day. We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no one could mess with me so long as he was around awesomacious: Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.
Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has
 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit)
 posted to AskReddit
 4 hours ago by nl1004
 2303 comments
 sorted by top
 DONE
 HIDE
 A PREV
 NEXT V
 A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2
 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses
 them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty
 older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy
 of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting
 his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage
 quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out
 of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the
 room and stormed out.
 I told my parents what happened and they told his parents
 and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It
 would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My
 family barely had enough money to get me the game for my
 birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never
 be able to play it again
 Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch
 Out. So my older brother went over to his house and
 switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome.
 A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2
 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness.
 When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the
 middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before
 they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of
 their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the
 time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother
 dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the
 sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to
 me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put
 one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day.
 We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no
 one could mess with me so long as he was around
awesomacious:

Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.

awesomacious: Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.

Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit) posted to AskReddit 4 hours ago by nl1004 2303 comments sorted by top DONE HIDE A PREV NEXT V A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the room and stormed out. I told my parents what happened and they told his parents and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My family barely had enough money to get me the game for my birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never be able to play it again Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch Out. So my older brother went over to his house and switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome. A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness. When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day. We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no one could mess with me so long as he was around Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.
Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has
 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit)
 posted to AskReddit
 4 hours ago by nl1004
 2303 comments
 sorted by top
 DONE
 HIDE
 A PREV
 NEXT V
 A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2
 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses
 them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty
 older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy
 of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting
 his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage
 quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out
 of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the
 room and stormed out.
 I told my parents what happened and they told his parents
 and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It
 would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My
 family barely had enough money to get me the game for my
 birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never
 be able to play it again
 Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch
 Out. So my older brother went over to his house and
 switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome.
 A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2
 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness.
 When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the
 middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before
 they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of
 their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the
 time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother
 dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the
 sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to
 me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put
 one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day.
 We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no
 one could mess with me so long as he was around
Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.

Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.

Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit) posted to AskReddit 4 hours ago by nl1004 2303 comments sorted by top DONE HIDE A PREV NEXT V A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the room and stormed out. I told my parents what happened and they told his parents and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My family barely had enough money to get me the game for my birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never be able to play it again Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch Out. So my older brother went over to his house and switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome. A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness. When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day. We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no one could mess with me so long as he was around Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother. via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2QSr17M
Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has
 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit)
 posted to AskReddit
 4 hours ago by nl1004
 2303 comments
 sorted by top
 DONE
 HIDE
 A PREV
 NEXT V
 A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2
 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses
 them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty
 older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy
 of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting
 his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage
 quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out
 of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the
 room and stormed out.
 I told my parents what happened and they told his parents
 and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It
 would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My
 family barely had enough money to get me the game for my
 birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never
 be able to play it again
 Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch
 Out. So my older brother went over to his house and
 switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome.
 A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2
 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness.
 When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the
 middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before
 they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of
 their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the
 time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother
 dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the
 sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to
 me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put
 one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day.
 We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no
 one could mess with me so long as he was around
Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother. via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2QSr17M

Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother. via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2QSr17M

Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit) posted to AskReddit 4 hours ago by nl1004 2303 comments sorted by top DONE HIDE A PREV NEXT V A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the room and stormed out. I told my parents what happened and they told his parents and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My family barely had enough money to get me the game for my birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never be able to play it again Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch Out. So my older brother went over to his house and switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome. A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness. When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day. We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no one could mess with me so long as he was around Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.
Emerged: A What's the rudest thing a guest has
 5173 ever done in your home? (self.AskReddit)
 posted to AskReddit
 4 hours ago by nl1004
 2303 comments
 sorted by top
 DONE
 HIDE
 A PREV
 NEXT V
 A Jombafomb 19496 points 3 hours ago x2
 Everyone has a story from their childhood that still pisses
 them off, this is mine. I was five years old and my snotty
 older cousin was over at our house. I had just gotten a copy
 of Mike Tyson's Punch out for my birthday. He was getting
 his ass kicked by king hippo and he got so angry he rage
 quit. But he didn't just rage quit, he ripped the cartridge out
 of the Nintendo and spit into it. Then he threw it across the
 room and stormed out.
 I told my parents what happened and they told his parents
 and they made him apologize, but the game was ruined. It
 would kind of play, but would freeze up all the time. My
 family barely had enough money to get me the game for my
 birthday never mind buying it again. I was sure I would never
 be able to play it again
 Then for Christmas this little shit got Mike Tyson's Punch
 Out. So my older brother went over to his house and
 switched our ruined cartridge with his. It was awesome.
 A Jombafomb 13320 points 7 hours ago x2
 I could write a book with tales of his awesomeness.
 When I was 12 he snuck me out of the house in the
 middle of the night to see The Foo Fighters (before
 they were the biggest band on earth) At the end of
 their set William Goldsmith (their drummer at the
 time) threw his sticks into the crowd and my brother
 dove headfirst and emerged victoriously with the
 sticks over his head a minute later. He gave them to
 me as a memento of my first real rock show. I put
 one in his coffin and the other I still have to this day.
 We still fought all the time like brothers do, but no
 one could mess with me so long as he was around
Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.

Redditor shares a few heartwarming stories about his elder brother.

Emerged: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. runawayrat: squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens Im fucking deceased
Emerged: A Portrait of James Il's
 'Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgovw
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 "improvements."

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters,
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting
 "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers.
runawayrat:

squidsticks:

King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband*

Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens


Im fucking deceased

runawayrat: squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians...

Emerged: squidsticks A Portrait of James l's Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgow "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 0) A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anyone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports, George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied marn in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a “lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting, "that I can scarcely see to write." But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discovery of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it's very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let's not look at this through a 21st century lens Fuente: squidsticks 117,177 notas Dammit straight people
Emerged: squidsticks
 A Portrait of James l's
 Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgow
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017
 0)

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anyone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports, George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 improvements."
 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied marn
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a “lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting,
 "that I can scarcely see to write." But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discovery of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers
 King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room
 to the room of a man he calls his husband*
 Historians: it's very hard to tell what kind of relationship
 they would have had, let's not look at this through a 21st
 century lens
 Fuente: squidsticks
 117,177 notas
Dammit straight people

Dammit straight people

Emerged: crappyanimalfacts:Every fortnight, Moosen return to the lake they emerged from at birth to refill its water supply from their magical ear tusks.
Emerged: crappyanimalfacts:Every fortnight, Moosen return to the lake they emerged from at birth to refill its water supply from their magical ear tusks.

crappyanimalfacts:Every fortnight, Moosen return to the lake they emerged from at birth to refill its water supply from their magical ear...

Emerged: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens
Emerged: A Portrait of James Il's
 'Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgovw
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 "improvements."

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters,
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting
 "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers.
squidsticks:
King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband*

Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens

squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very ha...