The
The

The

Meme Creators
Meme Creators

Meme Creators

Memes Comics
Memes Comics

Memes Comics

Meme Comic
Meme Comic

Meme Comic

Meme Rage
Meme Rage

Meme Rage

plant
plant

plant

thanking
 thanking

thanking

no idea
 no idea

no idea

tamed
 tamed

tamed

support
support

support

🔥 | Latest

creator: Did you forget your creator
creator: Did you forget your creator

Did you forget your creator

creator: Python Humor (Found on Twitter. Creator: Ryan Sawyer @EightballArt)
creator: Python Humor (Found on Twitter. Creator: Ryan Sawyer @EightballArt)

Python Humor (Found on Twitter. Creator: Ryan Sawyer @EightballArt)

creator: y @TheStrangeRoots How programming languages got their names Bash Clojure The creator wanted to include the letter 'c' (C#), 'I (Lisp) and 'j' (Java) and liked that it was a pun on 'closure! The word 'closure, the act of closing, comes from the Latin 'clausūra' stemming from' clauděre' which means 'to shut or close! Bash is an acronym for Bourne-again Shell, a pun on the Bourne Shell - named after creator Stephen Bourne - being "born again". 'Bash' is also a verb meaning 'to strike with a heavy blow', possibly from the Danish 'baske' meaning 'to beat, strike! Quite simply C got its name because it was preceded by a programming language called B.C spawned its own children including C++ and C#.It is the third letter in the English alphabet and was originally identical to the Greek letter 'Gamma', Java Go Elixir The name Java was the result of a highly- caffeinated brainstorming session. Java, or 'Jawa' in Indonesian, is the name of a large island in Indonesia that produces strong, dark and sweet coffee. It has been a slang term for coffee in the United States since the 1800s. One of the Google developers said the name Go, sometime referred to as Golang, was chosen because it was 'short and easy to type' The word 'go, meaning 'to travel or go somewhere' stems from the Old High German 'gan' (to go). The word 'elixir', meaning a potion or essence that prolongs life or preserves something, stems from the Arabic 'al-ikst' via the late Greek 'xerion', a powder for drying wounds. Appeared in Middle English from the 14th century. Java JavaScript Kotlin Perl Originally named Mocha, a type of fine quality coffee, it was later renamed JavaScript, combining Java, US slang for coffee, + 'Script, 'something that is written' from the Latin 'scriptum, 'a set of written words or writing. Inspired by Java, it was named after Kotlin Island in Russia. Originally called Kettusaari by the Finns ('fox island') and Ketlingen by the Swedes, (maybe stemming from 'kettel' meaning 'cauldron'). After Russia won control of the island in 1703 it was Initially named Pearl, the alternative spelling was adopted as the name was already taken. It comes from the Middle French 'perle 'meaning 'bead' or 'something valuable' and the Latin 'perna' meaning 'leg, also a mollusc shaped like a leg of mutton. JS renamed 'Kotling' then 'Kotlin. PHP Python Ris named partly after the first names of the first two R authors (Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman) and partly as a play on the name of S, itss parent langauge. It is the 18th letter in the alphabet and derives from the Greek letter 'Rho' php Originally known as Personal Home Page Construction Kit, this was later shortened to just PHP (an acronym for Personal Home Page). It is now accepted as the initials for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor. Creator Guido van Rossum named Python after TV comedy Monty Python's Flying Circus. The word 'python' comes from the ancient Greek 'Puthón, the name of a huge serpent killed by the god Apollo. Later adopted as a generic term for non- poisonous snakes that constrict their prey. Ruby Scala Rust Influenced by Perl, the developer chose a colleague's birthstone which followed it in the monthly sequence (June is Pearl, Ruby is July). Ruby comes from the Old French 'rubi', a 'reddish precious stone', and the Latin 'rubeus, 'red'. Rust's name comes from a fungus that is robust, distributed, and parallel. It is also a substring of robust. Rust, also the reddish coating formed on oxidized metal, stems from the German 'rost' and possibly the Indo-European base of 'red. Scala is a combination of the first letters of 'scalable' and 'language! It is also the Italian word for 'stairway', as it helps users to ascend to a better language. The logo is also an abstraction of a staircase or steps. SQL Swift TypeScript SQL Originating from the shortcomings of JavaScript, hence the similarility of the name. Its name combines 'Type', meaning a kind or class (from the Greek 'tuptein' 'to strike'), with 'Script, 'something that is written' from the Latin 'scriptum'. First called "Structured English Query Language" (SEQUEL), pronounced "sequel", it was a pun that it was the sequel to QUEL. It was later shortened to SQL. The word 'sequel' stems from the Latin 'sequela' from 'sequr' meaning 'to follow. The word 'swift' means 'moving with great speed or velocity' and can be traced back to the prehistoric 'swipt' meaning to 'move in a sweeping manner'. The swallow-like bird became known as a swift from the 17th century and is used as the language's logo. TS how programming languages got their names
creator: y @TheStrangeRoots
 How programming languages got their names
 Bash
 Clojure
 The creator wanted to include the letter 'c' (C#), 'I
 (Lisp) and 'j' (Java) and liked that it was a pun on
 'closure! The word 'closure, the act of closing, comes
 from the Latin 'clausūra' stemming from' clauděre'
 which means 'to shut or close!
 Bash is an acronym for Bourne-again Shell, a pun
 on the Bourne Shell - named after creator Stephen
 Bourne - being "born again". 'Bash' is also a verb
 meaning 'to strike with a heavy blow', possibly from
 the Danish 'baske' meaning 'to beat, strike!
 Quite simply C got its name because it was
 preceded by a programming language called B.C
 spawned its own children including C++ and C#.It
 is the third letter in the English alphabet and was
 originally identical to the Greek letter 'Gamma',
 Java
 Go
 Elixir
 The name Java was the result of a highly-
 caffeinated brainstorming session. Java, or 'Jawa'
 in Indonesian, is the name of a large island in
 Indonesia that produces strong, dark and sweet
 coffee. It has been a slang term for coffee in the
 United States since the 1800s.
 One of the Google developers said the name Go,
 sometime referred to as Golang, was chosen
 because it was 'short and easy to type'
 The word 'go, meaning 'to travel or go somewhere'
 stems from the Old High German 'gan' (to go).
 The word 'elixir', meaning a potion or essence that
 prolongs life or preserves something, stems from
 the Arabic 'al-ikst' via the late Greek 'xerion', a
 powder for drying wounds. Appeared in Middle
 English from the 14th century.
 Java
 JavaScript
 Kotlin
 Perl
 Originally named Mocha, a type of fine quality
 coffee, it was later renamed JavaScript, combining
 Java, US slang for coffee, + 'Script, 'something that
 is written' from the Latin 'scriptum, 'a set of
 written words or writing.
 Inspired by Java, it was named after Kotlin Island
 in Russia. Originally called Kettusaari by the Finns
 ('fox island') and Ketlingen by the Swedes, (maybe
 stemming from 'kettel' meaning 'cauldron'). After
 Russia won control of the island in 1703 it was
 Initially named Pearl, the alternative spelling was
 adopted as the name was already taken. It comes
 from the Middle French 'perle 'meaning 'bead' or
 'something valuable' and the Latin 'perna' meaning
 'leg, also a mollusc shaped like a leg of mutton.
 JS
 renamed 'Kotling' then 'Kotlin.
 PHP
 Python
 Ris named partly after the first names of the first
 two R authors (Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman)
 and partly as a play on the name of S, itss parent
 langauge. It is the 18th letter in the alphabet and
 derives from the Greek letter 'Rho'
 php
 Originally known as Personal Home Page
 Construction Kit, this was later shortened to just
 PHP (an acronym for Personal Home Page). It is
 now accepted as the initials for PHP: Hypertext
 Preprocessor.
 Creator Guido van Rossum named Python after TV
 comedy Monty Python's Flying Circus. The word
 'python' comes from the ancient Greek 'Puthón,
 the name of a huge serpent killed by the god
 Apollo. Later adopted as a generic term for non-
 poisonous snakes that constrict their prey.
 Ruby
 Scala
 Rust
 Influenced by Perl, the developer chose a
 colleague's birthstone which followed it in the
 monthly sequence (June is Pearl, Ruby is July).
 Ruby comes from the Old French 'rubi', a 'reddish
 precious stone', and the Latin 'rubeus, 'red'.
 Rust's name comes from a fungus that is robust,
 distributed, and parallel. It is also a substring of
 robust. Rust, also the reddish coating formed on
 oxidized metal, stems from the German 'rost' and
 possibly the Indo-European base of 'red.
 Scala is a combination of the first letters of
 'scalable' and 'language! It is also the Italian word
 for 'stairway', as it helps users to ascend to a
 better language. The logo is also an abstraction of
 a staircase or steps.
 SQL
 Swift
 TypeScript
 SQL
 Originating from the shortcomings of JavaScript,
 hence the similarility of the name. Its name
 combines 'Type', meaning a kind or class (from the
 Greek 'tuptein' 'to strike'), with 'Script, 'something
 that is written' from the Latin 'scriptum'.
 First called "Structured English Query Language"
 (SEQUEL), pronounced "sequel", it was a pun that it
 was the sequel to QUEL. It was later shortened to
 SQL. The word 'sequel' stems from the Latin
 'sequela' from 'sequr' meaning 'to follow.
 The word 'swift' means 'moving with great speed or
 velocity' and can be traced back to the prehistoric
 'swipt' meaning to 'move in a sweeping manner'. The
 swallow-like bird became known as a swift from the
 17th century and is used as the language's logo.
 TS
how programming languages got their names

how programming languages got their names

creator: I am sure that the creator has never washed a glass in his life.
creator: I am sure that the creator has never washed a glass in his life.

I am sure that the creator has never washed a glass in his life.

creator: I am sure that the creator has never washed a glass in his life.
creator: I am sure that the creator has never washed a glass in his life.

I am sure that the creator has never washed a glass in his life.

creator: This work could have adult content. If you proceed you have agreed that you are willing to see such content. Proceed Go Back secretstudentdragonblog: rmh8402: vi-maxwell-blog: thebaconsandwichofregret: justsparethoughts: zandracourt: shipping-isnt-morality: Good morning! I’m salty. I think we, as a general community, need to start taking this little moment more seriously. This, right here? This is asking for consent. It’s a legal necessity, yes, but it is also you, the reader, actively consenting to see adult content; and in doing so, saying that you are of an age to see it, and that you’re emotionally capable of handling it. You find the content you find behind this warning disgusting, horrifying, upsetting, triggering? You consented. You said you could handle it, and you were able to back out at any time. You take responsibility for yourself when you click through this, and so long as the creator used warnings and tags correctly, you bear full responsibility for its impact on you. “Children are going to lie about their age” is probably true, but that’s the problem of them and the people who are responsible for them, not the people that they lie to. If you’re not prepared to see adult content, created by and for adults, don’t fucking click through this. And if you do, for all that’s holy, don’t blame anyone else for it. This needs to be reblogged today. Consenting to see adult content doesn’t mean you should have to see a bunch of shit romanticizing incest and pedophilia you walnut Except this is the last line of consent before the actual work. So if you’re at this button you have already done the following: 1) chosen to go onto AO3 in the first place 2) chosen the fandom you wish to read about 3) had the chance to filter for the things you do want to see like a specific pairing or a specific AU 4) had the chance to specifically filter out any tags you don’t want to see like, oh I don’t know, incest and non-con and dub-con and paedophilia 5) had the chance to set the rating level if you wish to remove any explicit content at all 6) have read the summary of the story, which aren’t always great but are the only indicator of what the story will be like writing wise so something about it was good enough for you to click on it. 7) have read the tags of the story which will tell you what is actually in the story. If you have used filters to remove stories with things you don’t want then there shouldn’t be anything in here that’s a shock to you but maybe there is. That’s why the tags are there for you to check for yourself. 8) Then you have to actually click on the story. You cannot see anything other than the summary or the tags without personally deciding that you are going to open and read this story. 9) Only here, at step number nine, do you get to the adult content warning pictured above. You have been through eight different steps, the last six of which have also been opportunities for you to see that this has adult content. And AO3 has *STILL* stopped you to ask one last time “are you sure you want to read this because it has things that only adults should see in it”. If after this point you are reading incest and paedophilia then it’s probably because you specifically went looking for it. You walnut. This is the most beautiful thing that I have seen about ao3 Always important!!!!!! Cannot stress ‘you walnut’ enough
creator: This work could have adult content. If you proceed you
 have agreed that you are willing to see such content.
 Proceed
 Go Back
secretstudentdragonblog:

rmh8402:

vi-maxwell-blog:

thebaconsandwichofregret:

justsparethoughts:


zandracourt:

shipping-isnt-morality:

Good morning! I’m salty.

I think we, as a general community, need to start taking this little moment more seriously.

This, right here? This is asking for consent. It’s a legal necessity, yes, but it is also you, the reader, actively consenting to see adult content; and in doing so, saying that you are of an age to see it, and that you’re emotionally capable of handling it.

You find the content you find behind this warning disgusting, horrifying, upsetting, triggering? You consented. You said you could handle it, and you were able to back out at any time. You take responsibility for yourself when you click through this, and so long as the creator used warnings and tags correctly, you bear full responsibility for its impact on you.

“Children are going to lie about their age” is probably true, but that’s the problem of them and the people who are responsible for them, not the people that they lie to.

If you’re not prepared to see adult content, created by and for adults, don’t fucking click through this. And if you do, for all that’s holy, don’t blame anyone else for it.


This needs to be reblogged today.


Consenting to see adult content doesn’t mean you should have to see a bunch of shit romanticizing incest and pedophilia you walnut


Except this is the last line of consent before the actual work. So if you’re at this button you have already done the following:
1) chosen to go onto AO3 in the first place
2) chosen the fandom you wish to read about
3) had the chance to filter for the things you do want to see like a specific pairing or a specific AU
4) had the chance to specifically filter out any tags you don’t want to see like, oh I don’t know, incest and non-con and dub-con and paedophilia
5) had the chance to set the rating level if you wish to remove any explicit content at all
6) have read the summary of the story, which aren’t always great but are the only indicator of what the story will be like writing wise so something about it was good enough for you to click on it.
7) have read the tags of the story which will tell you what is actually in the story. If you have used filters to remove stories with things you don’t want then there shouldn’t be anything in here that’s a shock to you but maybe there is. That’s why the tags are there for you to check for yourself.
8) Then you have to actually click on the story. You cannot see anything other than the summary or the tags without personally deciding that you are going to open and read this story. 
9) Only here, at step number nine, do you get to the adult content warning pictured above. You have been through eight different steps, the last six of which have also been opportunities for you to see that this has adult content. And AO3 has *STILL* stopped you to ask one last time “are you sure you want to read this because it has things that only adults should see in it”. 
If after this point you are reading incest and paedophilia then it’s probably because you specifically went looking for it.
You walnut. 

This is the most beautiful thing that I have seen about ao3


Always important!!!!!!

Cannot stress ‘you walnut’ enough

secretstudentdragonblog: rmh8402: vi-maxwell-blog: thebaconsandwichofregret: justsparethoughts: zandracourt: shipping-isnt-moralit...

creator: ti skerb Retweeted Shan AF RJ mesa 15 - AF SP mesa 71 @ShanaBRX Jun 14 Fuck everyone who whines about ao3 News All News May 2019 Newsletter, Volume 135 Published: Thu 13 Jun 2019 01:03PM 03 Comments: 4 Recently, the Archive of Our Own has received an influx of new Chinese users, a result of tightening content restrictions on other platforms. We would like to extend our warmest welcome to them, and remind everyone that our committees are working to make AO3 as accessible as possible in languages other than English Read more... 20 t 2.8K 6.4K Show this thread wetwareproblem: wrangletangle: zoe2213414: eabevella: naryrising: You can read the post here for more info, but I wanted to just add a bit about what this entails from my POV, on the Support team.  Somewhere between ¼ to 1/3 of all our tickets last month were in Chinese (somewhere upwards of 300 out of 1200 or so), almost all from users just setting up their accounts or trying to find out how to get an invitation.  A lot of the tickets are what I’d characterize as “intro” tickets - they say hi, list favourite fandoms or pairings, or provide samples of fic they’ve written. Although this isn’t necessary on AO3, this is not uncommon in Chinese fandom sites that you have to prove your credentials to get in (in fact it wasn’t uncommon in English-language fandom sites 15-20 years ago).  We respond to all of these tickets, even the ones that just say hi.  We check whether the user has managed to receive their invite or get their account sent up, and if they haven’t, we help them do so.  This means taking every single ticket through our Chinese translation team twice, once so we make sure we understand the initial ticket, and then again to translate our reply.  This is a challenging process, although we’ve found ways to streamline it and can normally get a reply out pretty quickly (like within a few days).  We do it because this is part of why AO3 exists in the first place - to provide a safe haven where users can post their works without worrying about censorship or sudden crackdowns on certain kinds of content.  We do it because this is important, and helping these users get their accounts and be able to share their works safely is why we’re here.  We hope that we’ll be able to help as many of them as possible.   There have been a few (thankfully few, that I’ve seen) complaints about these new AO3 users not always knowing how things work - what language to tag with, or what fandom tags to use, for instance.  To this I would say: 1. Have patience and be considerate.  They are coming to a new site that they aren’t familiar with, and using it in a language they may not be expert in, and it might take a while to learn the ropes.  You can filter out works tagged in Chinese if you don’t want to see them.  Or just scroll past.   2. You can report works tagged with the wrong language or the wrong fandom to our Policy and Abuse team using the link at the bottom of any page.  This will not cause the authors to “get in trouble” (a concern I’ve heard before, as people are reluctant to report for these reasons).  It means the Policy and Abuse team will contact them to ask them to change the language/fandom tag, and if the creator doesn’t, they can edit it directly.  If you remember Strikethrough or the FF.net porn ban or similar purges, please keep them in mind and consider that these users are going through something similar or potentially worse.  This is why AO3 exists.  We are doing our best to try and help make the transition smooth.   I am a Taiwanese and I’d like to put some context behind the recent influx of China based AO3 users. China is tightening their freedom of speech in recent years after Xi has became the chairman (he even canceled the 10 years long term of service of chairman, meaning he can stay as the leader of China as long as he lives–he has became a dictator). They censor words that are deemed “sensitive”, you can’t type anything to criticize the chinise government. Big social media platform won’t even post the posts containing sensitive words. You don’t have the freedom of publish books without the books being approved by the government either. To disguise this whole Ninety Eighty-Four nightmare, they started to pick on the easy target: the women and the minorities (China is getting more and more misogynistic as a result of the government trying to control their male population through encouraging them to control the female population through “chinese tradition family value” but that’s another story). Last year, the chinese government arrested a woman who is a famous yaoi/BL novel writer named 天一 and sentenced her 10 years in jail for “selling obscene publications” and “illegal publication” (she’s not the only BL writer who got arrested. Meanwhile, multiple cases where men raped women only get about 2 years of jail time in China). It’s a warning to anyone who want to publish anything that’s “not approved” by the government that they can literally ruin you.  Just recently the chinese government “contacted” website owners of one of their largest romance/yaoi/slash fiction sites 晉江 and announced that for now on, for the sake of a Clean Society, they can’t write anything that’s slightly “obscene”. No sex scene, no sexual interaction, they can’t even write any bodily interaction below neck (I’m not kidding here). But that’s not their actual goal. They also listed other restriction such as: can’t write anything that’s about the government, the military, the police, “sensitive history”, “race problems”, which is… you basically can’t write anything that might be used as a tool to criticize the government (as many novels did). This recent development really hurt the chinese fanfic writers. They can’t write anything without the fear of being put on the guillotine by the government to show their control. Most of them don’t even think that deep politically, they just want to write slash fictions. But there are no platform safe in China, that’s why the sudden influx of chinese users to AO3. I bet it won’t be long before AO3 got banned in China, but until then, be a little bit patient to them. As much as I hate the chinese government, I pity their people. I’m crying so loud…As a Chinese, you don’t know how your kindness meant to us. When I’m young, I read 1984, and I thought this story is so unrealistic, but now, it’s getting tougher and tougher for fanfic and the writer in China. Thank you ao3. Thank you for the people who care about Chinese people. (hope I didn’t spell anything wrong) The OTW’s account on Weibo, the biggest Chinese social media site, is constantly fielding questions from Chinese users about how to get invitations, how to post, all of it. Chinese fans deeply want to learn how to use AO3. The difference between Lofter’s posting system and AO3′s is perhaps even wider than the gulf between Tumblr and AO3. But imagine if you had to navigate across that gap in a language you didn’t speak, using translation programs that don’t understand fan terminology. This is exactly what the AO3 was built to deal with. We just didn’t get a chance to get the internationalization done first, so things may be bumpy for a while. We are all part of fandom, so let’s take care not to leave anyone out. Just in case it isn’t clear to anyone? This. This right here is precisely why the AO3 doesn’t police content or remove things that are icky or obscene. Because it’s not you who defines what’s obscene. It’s the authorities.
creator: ti skerb Retweeted
 Shan AF RJ mesa 15 - AF SP mesa 71 @ShanaBRX Jun 14
 Fuck everyone who whines about ao3
 News
 All News
 May 2019 Newsletter, Volume 135
 Published: Thu 13 Jun 2019 01:03PM 03 Comments: 4
 Recently, the Archive of Our Own has received an influx of
 new Chinese users, a result of tightening content restrictions
 on other platforms. We would like to extend our warmest
 welcome to them, and remind everyone that our committees
 are working to make AO3 as accessible as possible in
 languages other than English
 Read more...
 20
 t 2.8K
 6.4K
 Show this thread
wetwareproblem:
wrangletangle:

zoe2213414:

eabevella:

naryrising:

You can read the post here for more info, but I wanted to just add a bit about what this entails from my POV, on the Support team.  Somewhere between ¼ to 1/3 of all our tickets last month were in Chinese (somewhere upwards of 300 out of 1200 or so), almost all from users just setting up their accounts or trying to find out how to get an invitation.  A lot of the tickets are what I’d characterize as “intro” tickets - they say hi, list favourite fandoms or pairings, or provide samples of fic they’ve written. Although this isn’t necessary on AO3, this is not uncommon in Chinese fandom sites that you have to prove your credentials to get in (in fact it wasn’t uncommon in English-language fandom sites 15-20 years ago).  We respond to all of these tickets, even the ones that just say hi.  We check whether the user has managed to receive their invite or get their account sent up, and if they haven’t, we help them do so.  This means taking every single ticket through our Chinese translation team twice, once so we make sure we understand the initial ticket, and then again to translate our reply. 
This is a challenging process, although we’ve found ways to streamline it and can normally get a reply out pretty quickly (like within a few days).  We do it because this is part of why AO3 exists in the first place - to provide a safe haven where users can post their works without worrying about censorship or sudden crackdowns on certain kinds of content.  We do it because this is important, and helping these users get their accounts and be able to share their works safely is why we’re here.  We hope that we’ll be able to help as many of them as possible.  
There have been a few (thankfully few, that I’ve seen) complaints about these new AO3 users not always knowing how things work - what language to tag with, or what fandom tags to use, for instance.  To this I would say:
1. Have patience and be considerate.  They are coming to a new site that they aren’t familiar with, and using it in a language they may not be expert in, and it might take a while to learn the ropes.  You can filter out works tagged in Chinese if you don’t want to see them.  Or just scroll past.  
2. You can report works tagged with the wrong language or the wrong fandom to our Policy and Abuse team using the link at the bottom of any page.  This will not cause the authors to “get in trouble” (a concern I’ve heard before, as people are reluctant to report for these reasons).  It means the Policy and Abuse team will contact them to ask them to change the language/fandom tag, and if the creator doesn’t, they can edit it directly. 
If you remember Strikethrough or the FF.net porn ban or similar purges, please keep them in mind and consider that these users are going through something similar or potentially worse.  This is why AO3 exists.  We are doing our best to try and help make the transition smooth.  

I am a Taiwanese and I’d like to put some context behind the recent influx of China based AO3 users.
China is tightening their freedom of speech in recent years after Xi has became the chairman (he even canceled the 10 years long term of service of chairman, meaning he can stay as the leader of China as long as he lives–he has became a dictator). 
They censor words that are deemed “sensitive”, you can’t type anything to criticize the chinise government. Big social media platform won’t even post the posts containing sensitive words. You don’t have the freedom of publish books without the books being approved by the government either.
To disguise this whole Ninety Eighty-Four nightmare, they started to pick on the easy target: the women and the minorities (China is getting more and more misogynistic as a result of the government trying to control their male population through encouraging them to control the female population through “chinese tradition family value” but that’s another story). 
Last year, the chinese government arrested a woman who is a famous yaoi/BL novel writer named 天一 and sentenced her 10 years in jail for “selling obscene publications” and “illegal publication” (she’s not the only BL writer who got arrested. Meanwhile, multiple cases where men raped women only get about 2 years of jail time in China). It’s a warning to anyone who want to publish anything that’s “not approved” by the government that they can literally ruin you.  
Just recently the chinese government “contacted” website owners of one of their largest romance/yaoi/slash fiction sites 
晉江

and announced that for now on, for the sake of a Clean Society, they can’t write anything that’s slightly “obscene”. No sex scene, no sexual interaction, they can’t even write any bodily interaction below neck (I’m not kidding here). 
But that’s not their actual goal. They also listed other restriction such as: can’t write anything that’s about the government, the military, the police, “sensitive history”, “race problems”, which is… you basically can’t write anything that might be used as a tool to criticize the government (as many novels did). 
This recent development really hurt the chinese fanfic writers. They can’t write anything without the fear of being put on the guillotine by the government to show their control. Most of them don’t even think that deep politically, they just want to write slash fictions. But there are no platform safe in China, that’s why the sudden influx of chinese users to AO3. 
I bet it won’t be long before AO3 got banned in China, but until then, be a little bit patient to them. As much as I hate the chinese government, I pity their people. 


I’m crying so loud…As a Chinese, you don’t know how your kindness meant to us. When I’m young, I read 1984, and I thought this story is so unrealistic, but now, it’s getting tougher and tougher for fanfic and the writer in China. Thank you ao3. Thank you for the people who care about Chinese people. (hope I didn’t spell anything wrong)

The OTW’s account on Weibo, the biggest Chinese social media site, is
 constantly fielding questions from Chinese users about how to get 
invitations, how to post, all of it. Chinese fans deeply want to learn 
how to use AO3. The difference between Lofter’s posting system and AO3′s
 is perhaps even wider than the gulf between Tumblr and AO3. But imagine
 if you had to navigate across that gap in a language you didn’t speak, 
using translation programs that don’t understand fan terminology.
This is exactly
 what the AO3 was built to deal with. We just didn’t get a chance to get
 the internationalization done first, so things may be bumpy for a 
while. We are all part of fandom, so let’s take care not to leave 
anyone out.


Just in case it isn’t clear to anyone? This. This right here is precisely why the AO3 doesn’t police content or remove things that are icky or obscene.
Because it’s not you who defines what’s obscene. It’s the authorities.

wetwareproblem: wrangletangle: zoe2213414: eabevella: naryrising: You can read the post here for more info, but I wanted to just add...

creator: ST 15 15 mrevaunit42: starafterdeath: schi-walker-locked: a-small-bowl-of-noodles: kakaphoe: of-another-broken-heart: kakaphoe: asymbina: iamsapphirecrimsonclaw: bluesey-182: captaindeadpoet: hiringdreamers: ezurad: commandtower-solring-go: kayas-wife: chandra-nalaar: viralthings: The more you look at this picture, the more anxious it becomes. this is just a normal waffle house there is a bloody handprint on the door There is somethung under the counter with the cups Blind man reading news paperSkull in the coffee Milk is $15 Lady’s hand is a tentacle the bleeding pie, the eyeball and fingers on the blind man’s plate… I was trying to find something nobody else had seen yet, when I realized… Look right above the tentacle arm. The second man at the buffet, what the hell is he doing? He’s either throwing up or eating an octopus. I think his face is just tentacles. The blind man has gills. Scariest detail: this image was ripped from the creator’s site and vandalized (edited to remove the watermark), then reuploaded for viral fame without so much as a mention of the artist’s name. SOURCE: http://jeffleejohnson.deviantart.com/art/Blue-Plate-Special-661961724 That said, the earlier observation about milk being $15 is off - artist confirms this is based on a 1920’s diner, so the price would be in cents. (http://comments.deviantart.com/1/661961724/4375070065)The table under the journal is lacquered with ants. The person holding the skull-creamed coffee paints the underside of their nails. Either that or their natural nails grow red.The journal’s writing, intentionally made hard to read and partially obscured, is somewhat of a cheat to all the things amiss in the scene. (http://comments.deviantart.com/1/661961724/4372574544) I can make out: “… and eyeball … have to think he is less strange than the horrifying creature that seems to have inhabited the cabinet behind him … all tentacles and teeth … (obscured by cup) … Where in the world can be found such nightmares?!” Reblogging for the correct source (I didn’t even notice the OP wasn’t the artist oops). There’s a second one, and there’s even more in this AAAHH, cool, but AAAAAHHHH Just a regular morning in Innsmouth. Passing your perception checks isn’t always a great idea
creator: ST
 15
 15
mrevaunit42:

starafterdeath:

schi-walker-locked:

a-small-bowl-of-noodles:

kakaphoe:

of-another-broken-heart:

kakaphoe:

asymbina:

iamsapphirecrimsonclaw:

bluesey-182:

captaindeadpoet:

hiringdreamers:


ezurad:


commandtower-solring-go:


kayas-wife:


chandra-nalaar:

viralthings:
The more you look at this picture, the more anxious it becomes.
this is just a normal waffle house

there is a bloody handprint on the door


There is somethung under the counter with the cups


Blind man reading news paperSkull in the coffee


Milk is $15


Lady’s hand is a tentacle


the bleeding pie, the eyeball and fingers on the blind man’s plate…

I was trying to find something nobody else had seen yet, when I realized…
Look right above the tentacle arm. The second man at the buffet, what the hell is he doing? He’s either throwing up or eating an octopus.

I think his face is just tentacles.

The blind man has gills.

Scariest detail: this image was ripped from the creator’s site and vandalized (edited to remove the watermark), then reuploaded for viral fame without so much as a mention of the artist’s name. SOURCE: http://jeffleejohnson.deviantart.com/art/Blue-Plate-Special-661961724 That said, the earlier observation about milk being $15 is off - artist confirms this is based on a 1920’s diner, so the price would be in cents. (http://comments.deviantart.com/1/661961724/4375070065)The table under the journal is lacquered with ants. The person holding the skull-creamed coffee paints the underside of their nails. Either that or their natural nails grow red.The journal’s writing, intentionally made hard to read and partially obscured, is somewhat of a cheat to all the things amiss in the scene. (http://comments.deviantart.com/1/661961724/4372574544) I can make out: “… and eyeball … have to think he is less strange than the horrifying creature that seems to have inhabited the cabinet behind him … all tentacles and teeth … (obscured by cup) … Where in the world can be found such nightmares?!”

Reblogging for the correct source (I didn’t even notice the OP wasn’t the artist oops).


There’s a second one, and there’s even more in this 


AAAHH, cool, but AAAAAHHHH



Just a regular morning in Innsmouth.


Passing your perception checks isn’t always a great idea

mrevaunit42: starafterdeath: schi-walker-locked: a-small-bowl-of-noodles: kakaphoe: of-another-broken-heart: kakaphoe: asymbina:...