And
And

And

experimental
experimental

experimental

colbi
 colbi

colbi

experiment
experiment

experiment

joints
joints

joints

depict
depict

depict

stereotypical
stereotypical

stereotypical

tropes
tropes

tropes

selflessness
selflessness

selflessness

shattered
shattered

shattered

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colorado college: No More Jezebel or Mammy: New Museum Art Exhibit Shatters @the original people Stereotypical Depictions of Black Women ti the original people vidst itch Repost @the_original_people with @repostapp ・・・ A new art exhibit at Louisiana’s Alexandria Museum of Art is breaking down the stereotype of the strong Black woman, thanks to contributions from Black female artists. Rather than depicting women who affirm that two-dimensional trope, these works showcase Black women with fully developed personalities who fully experience lived emotions. According to the gallery’s website, the exhibit “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” features work from the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation curated jointly by the InterDisciplinary Experimental Arts Space at Colorado College and the AMoA. Each work in the showcase unpacks the stereotypes of the angry, emasculating Sapphire, the overtly sexual Jezebel and the selflessly nurturing Mammy. In doing so, each idea is disproved in images. Mickalene Thomas’s “Why Can’t We Just Sit Down And Talk It Over” features a woman who may typically be seen as the Jezebel, but instead, she rests calmly with her shirt casually unbuttoned as she gazes crosslegged. OGpeople In Alison Saar’s piece, “Indigo Blue (Sea Island Pure),” it showcases a break from the strong black woman trope as the woman is covered in tears and her apperance is devoid of makeup. The “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” exhibit is on display at AMoA now through Feb. 18. It will also be on display at Colorado College beginning March 27.
colorado college: No More Jezebel or
 Mammy: New Museum
 Art Exhibit Shatters
 @the original people
 Stereotypical Depictions
 of Black Women
 ti the original people
 vidst itch
Repost @the_original_people with @repostapp ・・・ A new art exhibit at Louisiana’s Alexandria Museum of Art is breaking down the stereotype of the strong Black woman, thanks to contributions from Black female artists. Rather than depicting women who affirm that two-dimensional trope, these works showcase Black women with fully developed personalities who fully experience lived emotions. According to the gallery’s website, the exhibit “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” features work from the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation curated jointly by the InterDisciplinary Experimental Arts Space at Colorado College and the AMoA. Each work in the showcase unpacks the stereotypes of the angry, emasculating Sapphire, the overtly sexual Jezebel and the selflessly nurturing Mammy. In doing so, each idea is disproved in images. Mickalene Thomas’s “Why Can’t We Just Sit Down And Talk It Over” features a woman who may typically be seen as the Jezebel, but instead, she rests calmly with her shirt casually unbuttoned as she gazes crosslegged. OGpeople In Alison Saar’s piece, “Indigo Blue (Sea Island Pure),” it showcases a break from the strong black woman trope as the woman is covered in tears and her apperance is devoid of makeup. The “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” exhibit is on display at AMoA now through Feb. 18. It will also be on display at Colorado College beginning March 27.

Repost @the_original_people with @repostapp ・・・ A new art exhibit at Louisiana’s Alexandria Museum of Art is breaking down the stereotype...

colorado college: No More Jezebel or Mammy: New Museum Art Exhibit Shatters @the original people Stereotypical Depictions of Black Women A new art exhibit at Louisiana’s Alexandria Museum of Art is breaking down the stereotype of the strong Black woman, thanks to contributions from Black female artists. Rather than depicting women who affirm that two-dimensional trope, these works showcase Black women with fully developed personalities who fully experience lived emotions. According to the gallery’s website, the exhibit “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” features work from the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation curated jointly by the InterDisciplinary Experimental Arts Space at Colorado College and the AMoA. Each work in the showcase unpacks the stereotypes of the angry, emasculating Sapphire, the overtly sexual Jezebel and the selflessly nurturing Mammy. In doing so, each idea is disproved in images. Mickalene Thomas’s “Why Can’t We Just Sit Down And Talk It Over” features a woman who may typically be seen as the Jezebel, but instead, she rests calmly with her shirt casually unbuttoned as she gazes crosslegged. OGpeople In Alison Saar’s piece, “Indigo Blue (Sea Island Pure),” it showcases a break from the strong black woman trope as the woman is covered in tears and her apperance is devoid of makeup. The “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” exhibit is on display at AMoA now through Feb. 18. It will also be on display at Colorado College beginning March 27.
colorado college: No More Jezebel or
 Mammy: New Museum
 Art Exhibit Shatters
 @the original people
 Stereotypical Depictions
 of Black Women

A new art exhibit at Louisiana’s Alexandria Museum of Art is breaking down the stereotype of the strong Black woman, thanks to contributions from Black female artists. Rather than depicting women who affirm that two-dimensional trope, these works showcase Black women with fully developed personalities who fully experience lived emotions. According to the gallery’s website, the exhibit “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” features work from the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation curated jointly by the InterDisciplinary Experimental Arts Space at Colorado College and the AMoA. Each work in the showcase unpacks the stereotypes of the angry, emasculating Sapphire, the overtly sexual Jezebel and the selflessly nurturing Mammy. In doing so, each idea is disproved in images. Mickalene Thomas’s “Why Can’t We Just Sit Down And Talk It Over” features a woman who may typically be seen as the Jezebel, but instead, she rests calmly with her shirt casually unbuttoned as she gazes crosslegged. OGpeople In Alison Saar’s piece, “Indigo Blue (Sea Island Pure),” it showcases a break from the strong black woman trope as the woman is covered in tears and her apperance is devoid of makeup. The “Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women” exhibit is on display at AMoA now through Feb. 18. It will also be on display at Colorado College beginning March 27.

A new art exhibit at Louisiana’s Alexandria Museum of Art is breaking down the stereotype of the strong Black woman, thanks to contributi...