what am i going to do with my life now
 what am i going to do with my life now

what am i going to do with my life now

cartridge
 cartridge

cartridge

through
through

through

aspire
aspire

aspire

comfortability
comfortability

comfortability

tail
tail

tail

aspiration
aspiration

aspiration

joes
joes

joes

aspiring
aspiring

aspiring

nowadays
nowadays

nowadays

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Apparently, Bodies , and Books: :Doctor Sohna le vononr Quis non doberctjche egihey an anges tiabwngt artar Eucß nasmeen langen Sc u hurmit deutar figrasmanthian.und georaucl fvckthisreality: zacharielaughingalonewithsalad: cellarspider: twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck: purrsianstuck: During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. Mission fucking accomplished Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense. It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long. You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done. The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too. The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use. Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”. So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful. Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either. These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols! reblogging for the sweet history lesson Reblogging because of the History lesson and because the masks, the masks are cool
Apparently, Bodies , and Books: :Doctor Sohna
 le vononr
 Quis non doberctjche egihey
 an anges tiabwngt
 artar Eucß
 nasmeen langen Sc
 u
 hurmit deutar figrasmanthian.und georaucl
fvckthisreality:
zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies.
A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy.

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.
It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.
You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.
The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.
The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.
Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.
So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.
Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.
These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

Reblogging because of the History lesson and because the masks, the masks are cool

fvckthisreality: zacharielaughingalonewithsalad: cellarspider: twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck: purrsianstuck: During the Bubonic Plague, do...

America, Apparently, and Bad: mothman @LEVKAWA how to tell when a bilingual character was not written by a bilingual person 101 "Hola ¿Qué pasa?" Lance said. "Uh...what?" "Ah, sorry. It's hard to switch back sometimes. What's up?" He corrected kalidels: misdiagnosed-ghost: rrojasandribbons: cobaltmoony: silentwalrus1: justgot1: cricketcat9: artykyn: prideling: gunvolt: im going to have a stroke Instead try…Person A: You know… the thingPerson B: The “thing”?Person A: Yeah, the thing with the little-! *mutters under their breath* Como es que se llama esa mierda… THE FISHING ROD As someone with multiple bilingual friends where English is not the first language, may I present to you a list of actual incidents I have witnessed: Forgot a word in Spanish, while speaking Spanish to me, but remembered it in English. Became weirdly quiet as they seemed to lose their entire sense of identity.Used a literal translation of a Russian idiomatic expression while speaking English. He actually does this quite regularly, because he somehow genuinely forgets which idioms belong to which language. It usually takes a minute of everyone staring at him in confused silence before he says “….Ah….. that must be a Russian one then….”Had to count backwards for something. Could not count backwards in English. Counted backwards in French under her breath until she got to the number she needed, and then translated it into English.Meant to inform her (French) parents that bread in America is baked with a lot of preservatives. Her brain was still halfway in English Mode so she used the word “préservatifes.” Ended up shocking her parents with the knowledge that apparently, bread in America is full of condoms.Defined a slang term for me……. with another slang term. In the same language. Which I do not speak.Was talking to both me and his mother in English when his mother had to revert to Russian to ask him a question about a word. He said “I don’t know” and turned to me and asked “Is there an English equivalent for Нумизматический?” and it took him a solid minute to realize there was no way I would be able to answer that. Meanwhile his mom quietly chuckled behind his back.Said an expression in English but with Spanish grammar, which turned “How stressful!” into “What stressing!” Bilingual characters are great but if you’re going to use a linguistic blunder, you have to really understand what they actually blunder over. And it’s usually 10x funnier than “Ooops it’s hard to switch back.” I use Spanish and English daily, none is my native language. When I’m tired or did not have enough sleep I loose track of who to address in which language;  I caught myself explaining something in Spanish to my English-speaking friends more than once. When I’m REALLY tired I’ll throw some Polish words in the mix.  There is nothing more painful than bad fake Spanglish by an American writer. Bilingual people don’t just randomly drop words in nonsensical places in their sentences ffs. “I’m muy tired! I think I’ll go to my cama and go to sleep!“ Nobody does that. From my bilingual parents: - Only being able to do math in their original language. “Ok so that would beeeeee … *muttering* ocho por cuatro menos tres…” - Losing words and getting mad at you about it. “Gimme the - the - UGH, ESA COSA AHI’ CARAJO. The thing, the oven mitt. Christ.” - Making asides to you in Spanish even though you’ve told them to not do this as lots of people here speak Spanish. “Oye, mira esa, que cara fea.” “MOM FFS WE’RE IN A MEXICAN NEIGHBORHOOD.” - Swears in English don’t count. - Swears in Spanish mean you’d better fucking run, kid. - Introducing you to English-only Americans using your Spanish name so that they mispronounce your name for all eternity because that’s what your mom said your name was. “Hi Dee-yanna!” “sigh, Just call me Diana.” “Yeah but your mom said your name was Dee-yanna.”  - Your parents give you a name that only makes sense in Spanish. “Your name is Floor?” “No, my name is Flor.” “FLOOR?” “Sigh.”  - conjugating English words with Russian grammar and vice versa. Sometimes both at once, which is extra fun.  самолет -  самолетас -  самолетасы - when vice versa, dropping English articles entirely. The, a, an: all gone. e.g. “I go to store and buy thing, I fix car and go to place.” This also happens when i am very tired  - speaking English with heavy accent you don’t actually have - when my family and I are switching over fast, we say the English words in a very heavy Russian accent that mostly doesn’t show up otherwise  bonus:  - keysmashing in the wrong language when your keyboard is still switched over - using ))))) instead of :))) or other culture-specific emoji/typing quirks all of the above OMG. THIS.  -switching from Romanes to English and forgetting that articles exist because Romanes doesn’t always use them-starting to say a word in one language and trying to smoothly transition it to another language: n…oooooo, thank you is probably my most common-using English profanity when speaking Romanes-using Romanes profanity when speaking English.. that’s how you know I am angry-the over extension of the word “not” in English that comes out something like this; “I have not cash on me”.-counting in my head in Romanes always, but math always in English, which might explain my bad math skills-drunk accents.. I have a heavy accent when drunk.. and only when drunk-substituting Romani words when trying to speak in Serbian even when the other speaker is bilingual in English-aspirating English phonemes that are not meant to be aspirated -accidentally pronouncing the English “i” sounds as “ee”.. I have a dog named Snickers and everyone thinks her name is Sneakers-describing objects in detail, but forgetting the actual name of it in your target language; dzhanes, ‘odaji glazhuni.. thaj zhamija si ‘oda.. ejjjjj.. dikhes perdal oda.. ejjjj.. ekh… feljastra! Ekh feljastra! -”the thing” in both languages.. -except e buki also means “the work”, and o kasavo mean “such”, or “like this”, so in English I mean to say “the thing”, but I really say “the this, you know, this, this, this, the thingy.” But, it sounds like, “da dis, you know, dis, dis, dis, da tingy.”-subject verb agreement doesn’t exist when switching languages; ^^see above.. that was not an intentional mistake-“is mine” to mean “I have”; “Dog is mine” = “I have a dog” I could keep going.. but, yea, bilingual quirks are waaaay better and funnier when you actually understand how they work and the grammar quirks of both target languages.  I always fucking forget the word “chess”???? And I sit there saying шахматы over and over to myself until I finally remember it in English. blunders also happen when they have to note down something real quick or take lectures! my notes when I was in Italy for my exchange year are incomprehensible to basically everyone lmao it’s a huge jumble of thai, english, and italian. because sometimes it’s easier to just write down a concept in english rather than have to translate it back to your native language! also while I was there I spent a day with an american friend and when we were saying goodbye to each other this literally happened: “well have a safe trip home!! I’ll see you….. um…. dopo… dopo.. dopo.. LATER! LATER!! I’LL SEE YOU LATER”
America, Apparently, and Bad: mothman
 @LEVKAWA
 how to tell when a bilingual character was
 not written by a bilingual person 101
 "Hola ¿Qué pasa?" Lance said.
 "Uh...what?"
 "Ah, sorry. It's hard to switch back sometimes. What's
 up?" He corrected
kalidels:

misdiagnosed-ghost:

rrojasandribbons:

cobaltmoony:

silentwalrus1:

justgot1:

cricketcat9:

artykyn:

prideling:

gunvolt:
im going to have a stroke
Instead try…Person A: You know… the thingPerson B: The “thing”?Person A: Yeah, the thing with the little-! *mutters under their breath* Como es que se llama esa mierda… THE FISHING ROD

As someone with multiple bilingual friends where English is not the first language, may I present to you a list of actual incidents I have witnessed:
Forgot a word in Spanish, while speaking Spanish to me, but remembered it in English. Became weirdly quiet as they seemed to lose their entire sense of identity.Used a literal translation of a Russian idiomatic expression while speaking English. He actually does this quite regularly, because he somehow genuinely forgets which idioms belong to which language. It usually takes a minute of everyone staring at him in confused silence before he says “….Ah….. that must be a Russian one then….”Had to count backwards for something. Could not count backwards in English. Counted backwards in French under her breath until she got to the number she needed, and then translated it into English.Meant to inform her (French) parents that bread in America is baked with a lot of preservatives. Her brain was still halfway in English Mode so she used the word “préservatifes.” Ended up shocking her parents with the knowledge that apparently, bread in America is full of condoms.Defined a slang term for me……. with another slang term. In the same language. Which I do not speak.Was talking to both me and his mother in English when his mother had to revert to Russian to ask him a question about a word. He said “I don’t know” and turned to me and asked “Is there an English equivalent for Нумизматический?” and it took him a solid minute to realize there was no way I would be able to answer that. Meanwhile his mom quietly chuckled behind his back.Said an expression in English but with Spanish grammar, which turned “How stressful!” into “What stressing!”
Bilingual characters are great but if you’re going to use a linguistic blunder, you have to really understand what they actually blunder over. And it’s usually 10x funnier than “Ooops it’s hard to switch back.”

I use Spanish and English daily, none is my native language. When I’m tired or did not have enough sleep I loose track of who to address in which language;  I caught myself explaining something in Spanish to my English-speaking friends more than once. When I’m REALLY tired I’ll throw some Polish words in the mix. 

There is nothing more painful than bad fake Spanglish by an American writer. Bilingual people don’t just randomly drop words in nonsensical places in their sentences ffs. “I’m muy tired! I think I’ll go to my cama and go to sleep!“ Nobody does that.
From my bilingual parents:
- Only being able to do math in their original language. “Ok so that would beeeeee … *muttering* ocho por cuatro menos tres…”
- Losing words and getting mad at you about it. “Gimme the - the - UGH, ESA COSA AHI’ CARAJO. The thing, the oven mitt. Christ.”
- Making asides to you in Spanish even though you’ve told them to not do this as lots of people here speak Spanish. “Oye, mira esa, que cara fea.” “MOM FFS WE’RE IN A MEXICAN NEIGHBORHOOD.”
- Swears in English don’t count.
- Swears in Spanish mean you’d better fucking run, kid.
- Introducing you to English-only Americans using your Spanish name so that they mispronounce your name for all eternity because that’s what your mom said your name was. “Hi Dee-yanna!” “sigh, Just call me Diana.” “Yeah but your mom said your name was Dee-yanna.” 
- Your parents give you a name that only makes sense in Spanish. “Your name is Floor?” “No, my name is Flor.” “FLOOR?” “Sigh.”

 - conjugating English words with Russian grammar and vice versa. Sometimes both at once, which is extra fun. 
самолет - 
самолетас - 

самолетасы
- when vice versa, dropping English articles entirely. The, a, an: all gone. e.g. “I go to store and buy thing, I fix car and go to place.” This also happens when i am very tired 
- speaking English with heavy accent you don’t actually have - when my family and I are switching over fast, we say the English words in a very heavy Russian accent that mostly doesn’t show up otherwise 
bonus: 
- keysmashing in the wrong language when your keyboard is still switched over
- using ))))) instead of :))) or other culture-specific emoji/typing quirks

all of the above

OMG. THIS. 
-switching from Romanes to English and forgetting that articles exist because Romanes doesn’t always use them-starting to say a word in one language and trying to smoothly transition it to another language: n…oooooo, thank you is probably my most common-using English profanity when speaking Romanes-using Romanes profanity when speaking English.. that’s how you know I am angry-the over extension of the word “not” in English that comes out something like this; “I have not cash on me”.-counting in my head in Romanes always, but math always in English, which might explain my bad math skills-drunk accents.. I have a heavy accent when drunk.. and only when drunk-substituting Romani words when trying to speak in Serbian even when the other speaker is bilingual in English-aspirating English phonemes that are not meant to be aspirated -accidentally pronouncing the English “i” sounds as “ee”.. I have a dog named Snickers and everyone thinks her name is Sneakers-describing objects in detail, but forgetting the actual name of it in your target language; dzhanes, ‘odaji glazhuni.. thaj zhamija si ‘oda.. ejjjjj.. dikhes perdal oda.. ejjjj.. ekh… feljastra! Ekh feljastra! -”the thing” in both languages.. -except e buki also means “the work”, and o kasavo mean “such”, or “like this”, so in English I mean to say “the thing”, but I really say “the this, you know, this, this, this, the thingy.” But, it sounds like, “da dis, you know, dis, dis, dis, da tingy.”-subject verb agreement doesn’t exist when switching languages; ^^see above.. that was not an intentional mistake-“is mine” to mean “I have”; “Dog is mine” = “I have a dog”
I could keep going.. but, yea, bilingual quirks are waaaay better and funnier when you actually understand how they work and the grammar quirks of both target languages. 

I always fucking forget the word “chess”???? And I sit there saying шахматы over and over to myself until I finally remember it in English.

blunders also happen when they have to note down something real quick or take lectures! my notes when I was in Italy for my exchange year are incomprehensible to basically everyone lmao it’s a huge jumble of thai, english, and italian. because sometimes it’s easier to just write down a concept in english rather than have to translate it back to your native language!
also while I was there I spent a day with an american friend and when we were saying goodbye to each other this literally happened: “well have a safe trip home!! I’ll see you….. um…. dopo… dopo.. dopo.. LATER! LATER!! I’LL SEE YOU LATER”

kalidels: misdiagnosed-ghost: rrojasandribbons: cobaltmoony: silentwalrus1: justgot1: cricketcat9: artykyn: prideling: gunvolt: im ...

Memes, Moonlight, and 🤖: 12-Year-Old 'Moonlight' Star Wants To Spend Acting Money On Cancer Research soul ja4 “Moonlight” actor Alex R. Hibbert has big plans to heal the world. “Moonlight” actor Alex R. Hibbert has big plans to heal the world. Advertisement AdChoices In speaking with film site HeyUGuys.com, the 12-year-old actor dished on his early career aspirations to become a football player and a scientist in search of a cure for cancer. “In middle school I didn’t know what to do with my life,” he said. “I was a bit of a bad child, I’d always get in trouble because I had a lot of movement. But the drama program settled me down, I can use my movement for good.” The South Florida-native has earned praises from critics and co-stars for his performance of Little, a younger portrayal of the film’s lead character Chiron, who struggles growing up in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood. Hibbert’s “Moonlight” co-star Mahershala Ali called Hibbert the “best” scene partner he’s ever worked with. Now with a bright acting career on the horizon, Hibbert went on to tell the site that he plans to put his earnings towards science. “Football is out of the question now, but scientist-wise, I’m going to take most of my money… Wait, some of my money, and build a lab,” he said. “And I’m going to take the best scientists to work on curing cancer and stuff like that.” Kudos to Alex for making the world a better place! @lt_or_bust 17thsoulja blackexcellence BlackIG17th supportblackart supportblackyouth
Memes, Moonlight, and 🤖: 12-Year-Old 'Moonlight' Star
 Wants To Spend Acting
 Money On Cancer Research
 soul ja4
“Moonlight” actor Alex R. Hibbert has big plans to heal the world. “Moonlight” actor Alex R. Hibbert has big plans to heal the world. Advertisement AdChoices In speaking with film site HeyUGuys.com, the 12-year-old actor dished on his early career aspirations to become a football player and a scientist in search of a cure for cancer. “In middle school I didn’t know what to do with my life,” he said. “I was a bit of a bad child, I’d always get in trouble because I had a lot of movement. But the drama program settled me down, I can use my movement for good.” The South Florida-native has earned praises from critics and co-stars for his performance of Little, a younger portrayal of the film’s lead character Chiron, who struggles growing up in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood. Hibbert’s “Moonlight” co-star Mahershala Ali called Hibbert the “best” scene partner he’s ever worked with. Now with a bright acting career on the horizon, Hibbert went on to tell the site that he plans to put his earnings towards science. “Football is out of the question now, but scientist-wise, I’m going to take most of my money… Wait, some of my money, and build a lab,” he said. “And I’m going to take the best scientists to work on curing cancer and stuff like that.” Kudos to Alex for making the world a better place! @lt_or_bust 17thsoulja blackexcellence BlackIG17th supportblackart supportblackyouth

“Moonlight” actor Alex R. Hibbert has big plans to heal the world. “Moonlight” actor Alex R. Hibbert has big plans to heal the world. Advert...

Memes, Boeing, and And I Did: This 22-Year-old Is Already An Engineer With NASA And she's yet to graduate from MIT. with a 5.0. e Flight Center d Space Flight Ce CO17thsoulja4 Tiera Guinn is just 22 years old and she’s already working with NASA. As a Rocket Structural Design and Analysis Engineer for the Space Launch System that aerospace company Boeing is building for NASA, Guinn designs and analyzes parts of a rocket that she said will be one of the biggest and most powerful in history. Guinn, whose career trajectory seems like a sequel to the much-acclaimed “Hidden Figures” movie, has been aspiring to become an aerospace engineer since she was a child. Her mom, who noticed her daughter’s skills from a young age, made sure to Guinn stayed sharp by putting her intelligence to use...at the supermarket. “When [my mom and I] would go to the grocery store, she would get me to clip coupons [and] put it in my coupon organizer,” Guinn told WBRC News. “By the time we got to the register, I’d have to calculate the exact total, including tax. And I did that since I was six years old.” “One day I saw a plane fly by and I just had this realization, ‘huh, I can design planes. I’m going to be an aerospace engineer,”’ Guinn said. She chose all of her middle school classes accordingly and commuted an hour to go to the high school that would best prepare her for the future. Now, Guinn will soon be graduating from MIT with a 5.0 GPA and is clearly on a path to success. She said she’d advise young girls looking to follow in her footsteps to expect obstacles throughout their journey. “You have to look forward to your dream and you can’t let anybody get in the way of it,” she said. “No matter how tough it may be, no matter how many tears you might cry, you have to keep pushing. And you have to understand that nothing comes easy. Keeping your eyes on the prize, you can succeed.” 17thsoulja BlackIG17th
Memes, Boeing, and And I Did: This 22-Year-old Is Already An
 Engineer With NASA
 And she's yet to graduate from MIT. with a 5.0.
 e Flight Center
 d Space Flight Ce
 CO17thsoulja4
Tiera Guinn is just 22 years old and she’s already working with NASA. As a Rocket Structural Design and Analysis Engineer for the Space Launch System that aerospace company Boeing is building for NASA, Guinn designs and analyzes parts of a rocket that she said will be one of the biggest and most powerful in history. Guinn, whose career trajectory seems like a sequel to the much-acclaimed “Hidden Figures” movie, has been aspiring to become an aerospace engineer since she was a child. Her mom, who noticed her daughter’s skills from a young age, made sure to Guinn stayed sharp by putting her intelligence to use...at the supermarket. “When [my mom and I] would go to the grocery store, she would get me to clip coupons [and] put it in my coupon organizer,” Guinn told WBRC News. “By the time we got to the register, I’d have to calculate the exact total, including tax. And I did that since I was six years old.” “One day I saw a plane fly by and I just had this realization, ‘huh, I can design planes. I’m going to be an aerospace engineer,”’ Guinn said. She chose all of her middle school classes accordingly and commuted an hour to go to the high school that would best prepare her for the future. Now, Guinn will soon be graduating from MIT with a 5.0 GPA and is clearly on a path to success. She said she’d advise young girls looking to follow in her footsteps to expect obstacles throughout their journey. “You have to look forward to your dream and you can’t let anybody get in the way of it,” she said. “No matter how tough it may be, no matter how many tears you might cry, you have to keep pushing. And you have to understand that nothing comes easy. Keeping your eyes on the prize, you can succeed.” 17thsoulja BlackIG17th

Tiera Guinn is just 22 years old and she’s already working with NASA. As a Rocket Structural Design and Analysis Engineer for the Space Laun...

Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld, and Kevin Hart: I'm about to jump into theatres that seat 2000 people. Here I come' Kevin Hart's promise to the world eight years ago Kevin Hart O @KevinHartAreal It's time for me to really get focused and take it up a notch! I'm about to jump into theaters that seat 2000 people, here I come world! 07/04/2009, 21:44 'WORDS HAVE power', 'thoughts become things'. . It's likely you have heard these adages as you've journeyed through life. But for some of the most successful among us, these sayings have come to fruition. . By 2009, Kevin Hart had landed roles in films including Scary Movie 3, Soul Plane and Little Fockers, but warned the world that there was much more to come from him. . He tweeted at the time: "It's time for me to really get focused and take it up a notch. I'm about to jump into theatres that seat 2000 people, here I come people." . Fast forward to today and the 37-year-old is one of the biggest stand-up comedians in the world and is selling out theatres with his cinematic releases by the minute. . In 2011, Kevin grossed over $15 million from 'Laugh at My Pain' making it one of the year's top-selling comedy tours. . And just last year, he was given his own day in his home state of California. . “The state of California has just given me my own day,” he wrote. . “I’m proud to announce that in the state of California February 22nd will forever be know as “Kevin Hart Day” . In 2015, Time Magazine named Kevin, the self-dubbed 'Comedic Rockstar', one of the 100 most influential people in the world on the annual Time 100 list. . Writing about Kevin for TIME, fellow comedian Chris Rock wrote: "I recently told Jerry Seinfeld, "Kevin's at the big-boy table now, and nobody's telling him to go away." . Commenting on his old tweet, which was posted by a fan, Kevin wrote: "Fast forward to 7+ years later and I'm selling out football stadiums. Stay true to your dreams and aspirations and goals. Nobody believes in YOU more than YOU!" . @kevinhart4real 👑 . TBT TYEThrowback
Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld, and Kevin Hart: I'm about to jump into theatres that
 seat 2000 people. Here I come'
 Kevin Hart's promise to the world
 eight years ago
 Kevin Hart
 O
 @KevinHartAreal
 It's time for me to really get focused and take it up a
 notch! I'm about to jump into theaters that seat 2000
 people, here I come world!
 07/04/2009, 21:44
'WORDS HAVE power', 'thoughts become things'. . It's likely you have heard these adages as you've journeyed through life. But for some of the most successful among us, these sayings have come to fruition. . By 2009, Kevin Hart had landed roles in films including Scary Movie 3, Soul Plane and Little Fockers, but warned the world that there was much more to come from him. . He tweeted at the time: "It's time for me to really get focused and take it up a notch. I'm about to jump into theatres that seat 2000 people, here I come people." . Fast forward to today and the 37-year-old is one of the biggest stand-up comedians in the world and is selling out theatres with his cinematic releases by the minute. . In 2011, Kevin grossed over $15 million from 'Laugh at My Pain' making it one of the year's top-selling comedy tours. . And just last year, he was given his own day in his home state of California. . “The state of California has just given me my own day,” he wrote. . “I’m proud to announce that in the state of California February 22nd will forever be know as “Kevin Hart Day” . In 2015, Time Magazine named Kevin, the self-dubbed 'Comedic Rockstar', one of the 100 most influential people in the world on the annual Time 100 list. . Writing about Kevin for TIME, fellow comedian Chris Rock wrote: "I recently told Jerry Seinfeld, "Kevin's at the big-boy table now, and nobody's telling him to go away." . Commenting on his old tweet, which was posted by a fan, Kevin wrote: "Fast forward to 7+ years later and I'm selling out football stadiums. Stay true to your dreams and aspirations and goals. Nobody believes in YOU more than YOU!" . @kevinhart4real 👑 . TBT TYEThrowback

'WORDS HAVE power', 'thoughts become things'. . It's likely you have heard these adages as you've journeyed through life. But for some of th...