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After Graduation: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.
After Graduation: grrlpup:
antifainternational:

mousezilla:

rhube:

fahrlight:

westsemiteblues:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!

I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.

Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. 
The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  
I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. 

Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.

always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.

grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled:...

After Graduation: apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important. heroic
After Graduation: apismel1fera:
grrlpup:

antifainternational:

mousezilla:

rhube:

fahrlight:

westsemiteblues:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!

I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.

Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. 
The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  
I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. 

Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.

always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.

heroic

apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedl...

After Graduation: Entering the real world after graduation like <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIKeln-xbfk" target="_blank">Congratulations to all of the graduates out there! 🎓</a><br/></p>
After Graduation: Entering the real world after graduation like

<p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIKeln-xbfk" target="_blank">Congratulations to all of the graduates out there! 🎓</a><br/></p>

<p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIKeln-xbfk" target="_blank">Congratulations to all of the graduates out there! 🎓</a><br/></p>

After Graduation: <p><a href="http://apismel1fera.tumblr.com/post/155047166488/grrlpup-antifainternational-mousezilla" class="tumblr_blog">apismel1fera</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://grrlpup.tumblr.com/post/154788871772/antifainternational-mousezilla-rhube" class="tumblr_blog">grrlpup</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://antifainternational.tumblr.com/post/154733886594/mousezilla-rhube-fahrlight" class="tumblr_blog">antifainternational</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://mousezilla.tumblr.com/post/153876228031/rhube-fahrlight-westsemiteblues" class="tumblr_blog">mousezilla</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://rhube.tumblr.com/post/152500993243">rhube</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://fahrlight.tumblr.com/post/152299978919">fahrlight</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://westsemiteblues.tumblr.com/post/90079527286">westsemiteblues</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://returnofthejudai.tumblr.com/post/90076902843">returnofthejudai</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://robowolves.tumblr.com/post/40535964619">robowolves</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://bemusedlybespectacled.tumblr.com/post/40494473064">bemusedlybespectacled</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://gdfalksen.tumblr.com/post/38576888989">gdfalksen</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FChiune_Sugihara&amp;t=MGM5YjMwNzU0MTliNjE4ZTBmNzhmMzA3Zjc4MGE4MTAxNmE2YjI1YSxwa1h2MXRWdQ%3D%3D&amp;m=0">Chiune Sugihara</a>. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.</p> </blockquote> <p>Why can’t we have a movie about him?</p> </blockquote> <p>He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.</p> <p>His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.</p> <p>He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas <i>against direct orders</i>, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.</p> <p>He was honoured as <a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FRighteous_Among_the_Nations&amp;t=NWI3Nzk4YzhhZDBhN2UzYzI0MWRiYTk5MzVjYzhjYTgzNGNmZjNkNCxwa1h2MXRWdQ%3D%3D&amp;m=0">Righteous Among the Nations</a> in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.</p> <p>Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.</p> <p>It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.</p> </blockquote> <p>It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I <i>would</i> finance a movie about them.</p> </blockquote> <p>He told an interviewer:</p> <p><i>You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. </i></p> <p><i>People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.<sup></sup></i></p> <p>He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.</p> </blockquote> <p>I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!</p> </blockquote> <p>I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.<br/></p> </blockquote> <p>Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. </p> <figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1024" data-orig-width="768"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/384506b4e742aff6e3bf350a85efbd7c/tumblr_inline_ohh4pjqxmb1r7nvlv_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1024" data-orig-width="768"/></figure><p>The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  </p> <p>I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. </p> </blockquote> <p>Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.</p> </blockquote> <p>always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.</p> </blockquote> <p>heroic</p> </blockquote>
After Graduation: <p><a href="http://apismel1fera.tumblr.com/post/155047166488/grrlpup-antifainternational-mousezilla" class="tumblr_blog">apismel1fera</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="http://grrlpup.tumblr.com/post/154788871772/antifainternational-mousezilla-rhube" class="tumblr_blog">grrlpup</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://antifainternational.tumblr.com/post/154733886594/mousezilla-rhube-fahrlight" class="tumblr_blog">antifainternational</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://mousezilla.tumblr.com/post/153876228031/rhube-fahrlight-westsemiteblues" class="tumblr_blog">mousezilla</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://rhube.tumblr.com/post/152500993243">rhube</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://fahrlight.tumblr.com/post/152299978919">fahrlight</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://westsemiteblues.tumblr.com/post/90079527286">westsemiteblues</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://returnofthejudai.tumblr.com/post/90076902843">returnofthejudai</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://robowolves.tumblr.com/post/40535964619">robowolves</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://bemusedlybespectacled.tumblr.com/post/40494473064">bemusedlybespectacled</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://gdfalksen.tumblr.com/post/38576888989">gdfalksen</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FChiune_Sugihara&amp;t=MGM5YjMwNzU0MTliNjE4ZTBmNzhmMzA3Zjc4MGE4MTAxNmE2YjI1YSxwa1h2MXRWdQ%3D%3D&amp;m=0">Chiune Sugihara</a>. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Why can’t we have a movie about him?</p>
</blockquote>
<p>He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.</p>
<p>His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.</p>
<p>He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas <i>against direct orders</i>, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.</p>
<p>He was honoured as <a href="http://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FRighteous_Among_the_Nations&amp;t=NWI3Nzk4YzhhZDBhN2UzYzI0MWRiYTk5MzVjYzhjYTgzNGNmZjNkNCxwa1h2MXRWdQ%3D%3D&amp;m=0">Righteous Among the Nations</a> in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.</p>
<p>Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.</p>
<p>It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I <i>would</i> finance a movie about them.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>He told an interviewer:</p>
<p><i>You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. </i></p>
<p><i>People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.<sup></sup></i></p>
<p>He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!</p>
</blockquote>
<p>I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.<br/></p>
</blockquote>
<p>Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. </p>
<figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1024" data-orig-width="768"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/384506b4e742aff6e3bf350a85efbd7c/tumblr_inline_ohh4pjqxmb1r7nvlv_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1024" data-orig-width="768"/></figure><p>The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  </p>
<p>I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>heroic</p>
</blockquote>

<p><a href="http://apismel1fera.tumblr.com/post/155047166488/grrlpup-antifainternational-mousezilla" class="tumblr_blog">apismel1fera</a>...

After Graduation: 3 GUYS CONFESS THE BAFFLİNG THINGS THEY DID-WITH THEIR DICKS Towel Tried to see how many full size bath towels I could It was 4 and my dick almost snapped so I would not recommend, I'm average at 6 inches too so it's not ike I have a huge one either 2. Woah Sucked my own dick. You know that feeing after you finish to some questionable porn? That times 1000. 3. Getting To First Place Used it as雥gearshift and made car noises and pretended that I was racing. 4. Bad Stand Up Not me, but my gf loves to hold it like a microphone and tap it while saying Is this thing on? And proceeding into a whole bad joke stand up routine. This is haw about half of her bj attermpts end 5. Peek-a-Boo I'm uncircumcised. I used to kind of roll my foreskin nward until my entire penis was hidden. Then I'd let go and let it pop back out again. Shit was wild. 6. Limbering Up Did stretching exercises with it as a teen to sco if it pump from the kitchen for vacuum seal containers One time after I boned my girlfriend, I walked out to get a glass of water. As I passed my couch my cat swats at me and grazes my sack So I bopped him on top his head with my hailf-chub that My buddy in the sixth grade told me his story Everyone remembers how fun it is to put glue on your hand, and peel it ofr? He mutiplied the fun by putting it on his dick. And then, to multiply that fun by 10x he used superglue. Long story short, he had to have his mom poke holes in the peehole just so he could take a leak. He said it shot in multiple streams 10. Poor Teddy During one particularly heated masturbation session 14-year-old me decided to stick his dick in a hole in the rear end of his beloved childhood teddy bear to see if he could simulate having sex with something It didn't feel good or bad, and afterwards I oould never look it in the face again. 11. Puppet Master After we were done and it was in a relaxed state, had an ex that thought it was hilarious to shake it as if it were head banging and say "righteous!" in a voice that I guess was supposed to be that of my penis. When I was about 10 I put acetone on my junk. Seems weird. Made sense though as I wanted to remove the smiley face painted on with nail polish. 11 out of 10 would NOT recommend 13. Bro Stuff Gone Way Too Far A few years ago my best fiend had those giant holes n the lobes of his ears. He said it "made him look cool. Another friend thought I couldn't fit my penis through it ear hole and we bet 50 bucks. Put that image in your head 14. Hot Dog Time My girfriend at the time said she was hungry late at night and I asked if she wanted a hot dog. Went to the fridge, put my dick in a bun, put mustard on it, and walked bare assed back to my room and said, here ya go. She thought it was hilarious. I'm just glad my roommates didn't happen to come downstairs and see me putting mustard on my dick luminated by the gentle glow of the open fridge Whenaver I gat out of the shower with a semi chub I sometimes make it swing left and right so it slaps my hips and makes a noise. ng Stuck I fucked a bottle onca and my dick got stuck, had to So when I was a kid I had always heard masturbation referred to as "whacking off so the first time I tried t I literally just slapped my penis. Not hard just soft ittle taps. It actually worked but I'm glad I figured out 18. Timbeeeeeerrrrri I like to watch it fall like ล tree after an erection l fucked a full jar of strawberry jam. My housemates all skipped town very quickly after graduation, leaving me to clean the apartment, One of them left the jar of jam, and I was like, fuck it! 20. Fit Everything You Can my He has his foreskin, so one day we decided to stick an R4 cartridge ffor pirating Nintendo DS games) into t. Then the GBA cartridge (for same) lengthwise Then widthwise (t was a bit of a stretch lo took pictures Back Guarantee Put it in a kettle. Then got really depressed and questioned my life choices. Then later I was in the store I originally bought the kettle and saw there was a sign saying it had a fault and they were being recalled in, so I took it back, got the money and bought Assassin's Creed 2. 22. The Writer Typed. You have to keep rubbing it so it's heavy enough, then squat over the keyboard. Here- Naver mind. I was gonna type a sentence that way but I'm too lazy to boner 23. Pew Pew I'm uncircuncised and when I was younger I used to fill up my foreskin with water when I was in the bath and would shoot it out like a water gun Most of them are weird, but some are actually fun to play with!
After Graduation: 3 GUYS CONFESS
 THE BAFFLİNG THINGS
 THEY DID-WITH THEIR
 DICKS
 Towel
 Tried to see how many full size bath towels I could
 It was 4 and my dick almost snapped so I would not
 recommend, I'm average at 6 inches too so it's not
 ike I have a huge one either
 2. Woah
 Sucked my own dick. You know that feeing after you
 finish to some questionable porn? That times 1000.
 3. Getting To First Place
 Used it as雥gearshift and made car noises and
 pretended that I was racing.
 4. Bad Stand Up
 Not me, but my gf loves to hold it like a microphone
 and tap it while saying
 Is this thing on?
 And proceeding into a whole bad joke stand up
 routine.
 This is haw about half of her bj attermpts end
 5. Peek-a-Boo
 I'm uncircumcised. I used to kind of roll my foreskin
 nward until my entire penis was hidden. Then I'd let
 go and let it pop back out again. Shit was wild.
 6. Limbering Up
 Did stretching exercises with it as a teen to sco if it
 pump from the kitchen for vacuum seal containers
 One time after I boned my girlfriend, I walked out to
 get a glass of water. As I passed my couch my cat
 swats at me and grazes my sack
 So I bopped him on top his head with my hailf-chub
 that
 My buddy in the sixth grade told me his story
 Everyone remembers how fun it is to put glue on your
 hand, and peel it ofr? He mutiplied the fun by putting
 it on his dick. And then, to multiply that fun by 10x
 he used superglue. Long story short, he had to have
 his mom poke holes in the peehole just so he could
 take a leak. He said it shot in multiple streams
 10. Poor Teddy
 During one particularly heated masturbation session
 14-year-old me decided to stick his dick in a hole in
 the rear end of his beloved childhood teddy bear to
 see if he could simulate having sex with something
 It didn't feel good or bad, and afterwards I oould
 never look it in the face again.
 11. Puppet Master
 After we were done and it was in a relaxed state, had
 an ex that thought it was hilarious to shake it as if it
 were head banging and say "righteous!" in a voice
 that I guess was supposed to be that of my penis.
 When I was about 10 I put acetone on my junk.
 Seems weird. Made sense though as I wanted to
 remove the smiley face painted on with nail polish. 11
 out of 10 would NOT recommend
 13. Bro Stuff Gone Way Too Far
 A few years ago my best fiend had those giant holes
 n the lobes of his ears. He said it "made him look
 cool. Another friend thought I couldn't fit my penis
 through it ear hole and we bet 50 bucks.
 Put that image in your
 head
 14. Hot Dog Time
 My girfriend at the time said she was hungry late at
 night and I asked if she wanted a hot dog. Went to
 the fridge, put my dick in a bun, put mustard on it,
 and walked bare assed back to my room and said,
 here ya go. She thought it was hilarious. I'm just
 glad my roommates didn't happen to come
 downstairs and see me putting mustard on my dick
 luminated by the gentle glow of the open fridge
 Whenaver I gat out of the shower with a semi chub I
 sometimes make it swing left and right so it slaps my
 hips and makes a noise.
 ng Stuck
 I fucked a bottle onca and my dick got stuck, had to
 So when I was a kid I had always heard masturbation
 referred to as "whacking off so the first time I tried t
 I literally just slapped my penis. Not hard just soft
 ittle taps. It actually worked but I'm glad I figured out
 18. Timbeeeeeerrrrri
 I like to watch it fall like ล tree after an erection
 l fucked a full jar of strawberry jam. My housemates
 all skipped town very quickly after graduation, leaving
 me to clean the apartment, One of them left the jar of
 jam, and I was like, fuck it!
 20. Fit Everything You Can
 my
 He has his foreskin, so one day we decided to stick
 an R4 cartridge ffor pirating Nintendo DS games) into
 t. Then the GBA cartridge (for same) lengthwise
 Then widthwise (t was a bit of a stretch lo took
 pictures
 Back Guarantee
 Put it in a kettle. Then got really depressed and
 questioned my life choices. Then later I was in the
 store I originally bought the kettle and saw there was
 a sign saying it had a fault and they were being
 recalled in, so I took it back, got the money and
 bought Assassin's Creed 2.
 22. The Writer
 Typed. You have to keep rubbing it so it's heavy
 enough, then squat over the keyboard. Here-
 Naver mind. I was gonna type a sentence that way
 but I'm too lazy to boner
 23. Pew Pew
 I'm uncircuncised and when I was younger I used to
 fill up my foreskin with water when I was in the bath
 and would shoot it out like a water gun
Most of them are weird, but some are actually fun to play with!

Most of them are weird, but some are actually fun to play with!

After Graduation: <p><a href="http://coolchicksfromhistory.tumblr.com/post/143916297552/maggie-gee-1923-2013-art-by-kivitasku-tumblr" class="tumblr_blog">coolchicksfromhistory</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Maggie Gee (1923-2013)</p><p>Art by Kivitasku (<a href="http://kivitaskuart.tumblr.com/">tumblr</a>, <a href="http://society6.com/Ilthit">society6</a>)</p><p>When the US entered World War II, Maggie left her studies at UC Berkeley to work as a drafter at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard.  While working at the shipyard, Maggie learned of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program, which organized civilian female pilots to fly military aircraft in the US.  In 1943, Maggie and two of her friends took a temporary leave of absence from their jobs to learn to fly.  For $800, the three women spent six months training under civilian flight educators in Nevada.  At the end of the their training, they applied to the WASP program and returned to work at Mare Island.</p><p>Eight percent of WASP applicants were accepted into the training program.   Both Maggie and her white friend Jean made the cut.  (The third friend, a Filipino-American woman named Mary was rejected for poor eyesight). The two women arrived at Avenger Field in Texas in February 1944.  Jean, like half of all WASP trainees, washed out, but Maggie successfully completed the program.  She was the second and final Chinese-American woman to join the WASP program.  </p><p>After graduation, Maggie was sent to Las Vegas Army Air Field where she served as a tow target pilot until the the program was deactivated on December 20, 1944.  She then returned to Berkeley where she completed a graduate degree in physics and worked at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.</p><p>Maggie was active in Democratic politics, serving on the Alameda County Democratic Central Committee, the board of of the Berkeley Democratic Club, the California Democratic Party Executive Board, and Asian Pacific Islander Democratic Caucus.</p><p>In 2010, Maggie and the other surviving WASP pilots received the Congressional Gold medal.</p><p>Maggie’s 2013 obituary in <i>The San Francisco Chronicle</i> ended with the following request: <a href="http://waspfinalflight.blogspot.com/2013/02/maggie-gee-44-w-7-feb-1-2013.html">“If you would like to honor Maggie, be sure to vote in every election for the rest of your life, always participate in public life, support your community and enjoy every moment that you can. In lieu of flowers, Maggie asked that donations be made to Planned Parenthood of Alameda County…”</a><br/></p></blockquote> <p>&ldquo;In lieu of flowers, Maggie asked that donations be made to Planned Parenthood of Alameda County…”</p><p>Fuck that.</p>
After Graduation: <p><a href="http://coolchicksfromhistory.tumblr.com/post/143916297552/maggie-gee-1923-2013-art-by-kivitasku-tumblr" class="tumblr_blog">coolchicksfromhistory</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>Maggie Gee (1923-2013)</p><p>Art by Kivitasku (<a href="http://kivitaskuart.tumblr.com/">tumblr</a>, <a href="http://society6.com/Ilthit">society6</a>)</p><p>When the US entered World War II, Maggie left her studies at UC Berkeley to work as a drafter at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard.  While working at the shipyard, Maggie learned of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program, which organized civilian female pilots to fly military aircraft in the US.  In 1943, Maggie and two of her friends took a temporary leave of absence from their jobs to learn to fly.  For $800, the three women spent six months training under civilian flight educators in Nevada.  At the end of the their training, they applied to the WASP program and returned to work at Mare Island.</p><p>Eight percent of WASP applicants were accepted into the training program.   Both Maggie and her white friend Jean made the cut.  (The third friend, a Filipino-American woman named Mary was rejected for poor eyesight). The two women arrived at Avenger Field in Texas in February 1944.  Jean, like half of all WASP trainees, washed out, but Maggie successfully completed the program.  She was the second and final Chinese-American woman to join the WASP program.  </p><p>After graduation, Maggie was sent to Las Vegas Army Air Field where she served as a tow target pilot until the the program was deactivated on December 20, 1944.  She then returned to Berkeley where she completed a graduate degree in physics and worked at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.</p><p>Maggie was active in Democratic politics, serving on the Alameda County Democratic Central Committee, the board of of the Berkeley Democratic Club, the California Democratic Party Executive Board, and Asian Pacific Islander Democratic Caucus.</p><p>In 2010, Maggie and the other surviving WASP pilots received the Congressional Gold medal.</p><p>Maggie’s 2013 obituary in <i>The San Francisco Chronicle</i> ended with the following request: <a href="http://waspfinalflight.blogspot.com/2013/02/maggie-gee-44-w-7-feb-1-2013.html">“If you would like to honor Maggie, be sure to vote in every election for the rest of your life, always participate in public life, support your community and enjoy every moment that you can. In lieu of flowers, Maggie asked that donations be made to Planned Parenthood of Alameda County…”</a><br/></p></blockquote>

<p>&ldquo;In lieu of flowers, Maggie asked that donations be made to Planned Parenthood of Alameda County…”</p><p>Fuck that.</p>

<p><a href="http://coolchicksfromhistory.tumblr.com/post/143916297552/maggie-gee-1923-2013-art-by-kivitasku-tumblr" class="tumblr_blog">c...