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Black History
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Guns, Tumblr, and Black: black-in-kansas: cerebralzero: john-brown-abolitionist:free prints Do they know john brown used guns?
Guns, Tumblr, and Black: black-in-kansas:

cerebralzero:

john-brown-abolitionist:free prints


Do they know john brown used guns?

black-in-kansas: cerebralzero: john-brown-abolitionist:free prints Do they know john brown used guns?

Anna, Birthday, and Black History Month: <p>Black history month day 14: social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman Frederick Douglas.</p> <p>Frederick Douglas was born a slave in Maryland in February of 1818. It is likely that his father was also his first master. He celebrated his birthday on February 14, although there is no official record of his date of birth. He was taught the basics of reading by his master&rsquo;s wife, but her husband discouraged it believing that an education would draw slaves to want freedom. Douglass later insisted that education was the pathway to freedom, and his eloquence stunned many people and challenged the idea that blacks were not capable of being educated enough to enter society as free citizens. In fact, Douglass was so well spoken that many accused him of having never been a slave.</p> <p>Douglass wrote several autobiographies. Describing his experiences as a slave. His 1845 autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, became a bestseller and was influential in promoting the cause of abolition, as was his second book, My Bondage and My Freedom (1855). </p> <p>After the Civil War, Douglass remained an active abolitionist as well as a women&rsquo;s suffragist. He was active in the Republican Party. Douglass became the first African American nominated for Vice President of the United States as the running mate and Vice Presidential nominee of Victoria Woodhull, on the Equal Rights Party ticket. </p> <p>After escaping slavery, Douglass married a free black woman, Anna Murray and the two remained married for over 40 years and had several children. After Anna died, Douglass remarried to a white feminist and abolitionist named Helen Pitts. Though interracial marriage was certainly rare at the time, Pitts and Douglass were quite in love and paid no mind to detractors, many within their own families. Douglass responded to the criticisms by saying that his first marriage had been to someone the color of his mother, and his second to someone the color of his father.</p>
Anna, Birthday, and Black History Month: <p>Black history month day 14: social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman Frederick Douglas.</p>

<p>Frederick Douglas was born a slave in Maryland in February of 1818. It is likely that his father was also his first master. He celebrated his birthday on February 14, although there is no official record of his date of birth. He was taught the basics of reading by his master&rsquo;s wife, but her husband discouraged it believing that an education would draw slaves to want freedom. Douglass later insisted that education was the pathway to freedom, and his eloquence stunned many people and challenged the idea that blacks were not capable of being educated enough to enter society as free citizens. In fact, Douglass was so well spoken that many accused him of having never been a slave.</p>

<p>Douglass wrote several autobiographies. Describing his experiences as a slave. His 1845 autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, became a bestseller and was influential in promoting the cause of abolition, as was his second book, My Bondage and My Freedom (1855). </p>

<p>After the Civil War, Douglass remained an active abolitionist as well as a women&rsquo;s suffragist. He was active in the Republican Party. Douglass became the first African American nominated for Vice President of the United States as the running mate and Vice Presidential nominee of Victoria Woodhull, on the Equal Rights Party ticket. </p>

<p>After escaping slavery, Douglass married a free black woman, Anna Murray and the two remained married for over 40 years and had several children. After Anna died, Douglass remarried to a white feminist and abolitionist named Helen Pitts. Though interracial marriage was certainly rare at the time, Pitts and Douglass were quite in love and paid no mind to detractors, many within their own families. Douglass responded to the criticisms by saying that his first marriage had been to someone the color of his mother, and his second to someone the color of his father.</p>

Black history month day 14: social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman Frederick Douglas. Frederick Douglas was born a sl...

Abraham Lincoln, Black History Month, and God: <p>Black history month day 9: human rights activist, abolitionist, and speaker Sojourner Truth.</p> <p>Sojourner Truth was born born Isabella “Bell” Baumfree around the year 1797. She was born into slavery in Ulster County, New York. In 1826, Truth escaped slavery with her infant daughter. Two years later she went back and sued for the custody of her son, a suit she actually won becoming the first black woman to win a case against a white man. She later described her escape “I did not run off, for I thought that wicked. But I walked off, believing that to be right.”</p> <p>In 1843 she became convinced that God has called her to leave the city and go into the countryside “testifying the hope that was in her.”, and thus changed her name from Isabella Baumfree to Sojourner Truth. In 1851 at the Ohio women’s rights convention, Truth delivered her famous speech “Ain’t I a Woman?”. According to some reports, the speech known today is actually a rewritten variant of her original speech written in a stereotypical southern dialect, as in actuality the NY native Truth’s first language was Dutch and she spoke with a Dutch accent for the remainder of her life. During the Civil War Truth helped recruit forces for the Union army. She remained very active in abolition and other human rights causes, and despite her illiteracy, she toured around with conventions giving speeches and even meeting president Abraham Lincoln. </p>
Abraham Lincoln, Black History Month, and God: <p>Black history month day 9: human rights activist, abolitionist, and speaker Sojourner Truth.</p>

<p>Sojourner Truth was born born Isabella “Bell” Baumfree around the year 1797. She was born into slavery in Ulster County, New York. In 1826, Truth escaped slavery with her infant daughter. Two years later she went back and sued for the custody of her son, a suit she actually won becoming the first black woman to win a case against a white man. She later described her escape “I did not run off, for I thought that wicked. But I walked off, believing that to be right.”</p>

<p>In 1843 she became convinced that God has called her to leave the city and go into the countryside “testifying the hope that was in her.”, and thus changed her name from Isabella Baumfree to Sojourner Truth. In 1851 at the Ohio women’s rights convention, Truth delivered her famous speech “Ain’t I a Woman?”. According to some reports, the speech known today is actually a rewritten variant of her original speech written in a stereotypical southern dialect, as in actuality the NY native Truth’s first language was Dutch and she spoke with a Dutch accent for the remainder of her life. During the Civil War Truth helped recruit forces for the Union army. She remained very active in abolition and other human rights causes, and despite her illiteracy, she toured around with conventions giving speeches and even meeting president Abraham Lincoln. </p>

Black history month day 9: human rights activist, abolitionist, and speaker Sojourner Truth. Sojourner Truth was born born Isabella “Bell” ...

Africa, Black History Month, and Children: <p>Black history month day 6: Olaudah Equiano.<br/></p> <p>Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vaasa, was a prominent African in London. He was a freed slave who supported the British movement to end the slave trade. His autobiography, published in 1789, helped in the creation of the Slave Trade Act 1807 which ended the African trade for Britain and its colonies. Equiano was part of the Sons of Africa, an abolitionist group composed of prominent Africans living in Britain, and he was active among leaders of the anti-slave trade in the 1780s.</p> <p>Equiano’s book, “The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African”, is one of the earliest-known examples of published writing by an African writer to be widely read in England. By 1792, it was a best seller: it has been published in Russia, Germany, Holland, and the United States. It was the first influential slave narrative of what became a large literary genre. Equiano’s experience in slavery was quite different from that of most slaves as he did not participate in field work. Rather, he served his owners personally and went to sea, was taught to read and write, and worked in trading. Even after his freedom he continued to be an explorer and travel extensively everywhere from the Arctic to the United States.</p> <p>His Life as a freed slave was stressful, and he suffered from suicidal thoughts until he became a born-again Christian and found peace in his faith. He married in English woman, Susannah Cullen, and together they had two children.</p>
Africa, Black History Month, and Children: <p>Black history month day 6: Olaudah Equiano.<br/></p>
<p>Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vaasa, was a prominent African in London. He was a freed slave who supported the British movement to end the slave trade. His autobiography, published in 1789, helped in the creation of the Slave Trade Act 1807 which ended the African trade for Britain and its colonies. Equiano was part of the Sons of Africa, an abolitionist group composed of prominent Africans living in Britain, and he was active among leaders of the anti-slave trade in the 1780s.</p>

<p>Equiano’s book, “The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African”, is one of the earliest-known examples of published writing by an African writer to be widely read in England. By 1792, it was a best seller: it has been published in Russia, Germany, Holland, and the United States. It was the first influential slave narrative of what became a large literary genre. Equiano’s experience in slavery was quite different from that of most slaves as he did not participate in field work. Rather, he served his owners personally and went to sea, was taught to read and write, and worked in trading. Even after his freedom he continued to be an explorer and travel extensively everywhere from the Arctic to the United States.</p>

<p>His Life as a freed slave was stressful, and he suffered from suicidal thoughts until he became a born-again Christian and found peace in his faith. He married in English woman, Susannah Cullen, and together they had two children.</p>

Black history month day 6: Olaudah Equiano. Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vaasa, was a prominent African in London. He was a freed...

Black History Month, Definitely, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://ipreferthe-drummer.tumblr.com/post/139685498035/proudblackconservative-since-it-is-black" class="tumblr_blog">ipreferthe-drummer</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://proudblackconservative.tumblr.com/post/139682882774/since-it-is-black-history-month-whatever-i-may" class="tumblr_blog">proudblackconservative</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Since it is black history month, whatever I may feel on the matter, I decided to share some of the people in black history I find most inspiring:<br/> 1. Sojourner Truth – Slave and eloquent public speaker. Famed for her speech “Ain’t I a Woman?”<br/> 2. Madame CJ Walker – The first female (of any race) self-made millionaire. Made her fortune selling hair care products.<br/> 3. Harriet Tubman – Escaped slave and emancipator of hundreds<br/> 4. Douglas – Former slave, abolitionist, orator, writer, suffragist, and vice presidential nominee<br/> 5. Booker T. Washington – Foremost black educator of the late 19th and early 20th century. Invaluable in southern race relations.</p> <p>These men and women made a huge impact in a time where everything was set against them. Not content to simply be victims or hate their perceived oppressors, they did what they could with what they had to make a difference and we remember them for it today by celebrating the many opportunities that the fought for everyone to have.</p> </blockquote> <p>Have you heard of George Washington Carver? He’s one of my favorite people in American history. He was raised as a slave and went on to become a botanist that made things out of crops in the south that were very common. Often the cash crops such as tobacco would make the land tough to grow things on but he invented so many things to do with peanuts and sweet potatoes that he practically created an entire new market for farmers that wouldn’t hurt their land as much. He’s awesome.</p></blockquote> <p>Yes! I really like him too! This is definitely not an exhaustive list of great African-American history makers :)</p>
Black History Month, Definitely, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://ipreferthe-drummer.tumblr.com/post/139685498035/proudblackconservative-since-it-is-black" class="tumblr_blog">ipreferthe-drummer</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://proudblackconservative.tumblr.com/post/139682882774/since-it-is-black-history-month-whatever-i-may" class="tumblr_blog">proudblackconservative</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Since it is black history month, whatever I may feel on the matter, I decided to share some of the people in black history I find most inspiring:<br/>
1. Sojourner Truth – Slave and eloquent public speaker. Famed for her speech “Ain’t I a Woman?”<br/>
2. Madame CJ Walker – The first female (of any race) self-made millionaire. Made her fortune selling hair care products.<br/>
3. Harriet Tubman – Escaped slave and emancipator of hundreds<br/>
4. Douglas – Former slave, abolitionist, orator, writer, suffragist, and vice presidential nominee<br/>
5. Booker T. Washington – Foremost black educator of the late 19th and early 20th century. Invaluable in southern race relations.</p>

<p>These men and women made a huge impact in a time where everything was set against them. Not content to simply be victims or hate their perceived oppressors, they did what they could with what they had to make a difference and we remember them for it today by celebrating the many opportunities that the fought for everyone to have.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Have you heard of George Washington Carver? He’s one of my favorite people in American history. He was raised as a slave and went on to become a botanist that made things out of crops in the south that were very common. Often the cash crops such as tobacco would make the land tough to grow things on but he invented so many things to do with peanuts and sweet potatoes that he practically created an entire new market for farmers that wouldn’t hurt their land as much. He’s awesome.</p></blockquote>

<p>Yes! I really like him too! This is definitely not an exhaustive list of great African-American history makers :)</p>

ipreferthe-drummer: proudblackconservative: Since it is black history month, whatever I may feel on the matter, I decided to share some of...

Animals, Future, and Gif: TreeHugger 11 minutes ago. treehugge What if prey didn't have to suffer? Meet the people who want to turn predators into vegans treehugger.com <p><a href="http://bedpolebed.tumblr.com/post/123487680626/elegantly-effervescent-sodomymcscurvylegs" class="tumblr_blog">bedpolebed</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://elegantly-effervescent.tumblr.com/post/119110171700/sodomymcscurvylegs-starkillerrx" class="tumblr_blog">elegantly-effervescent</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://sodomymcscurvylegs.tumblr.com/post/115246259649/starkillerrx-minority-privilege" class="tumblr_blog">sodomymcscurvylegs</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://starkillerrx.tumblr.com/post/115113013309/minority-privilege-shybutnotsilent" class="tumblr_blog">starkillerrx</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://minority-privilege.tumblr.com/post/115109942145/shybutnotsilent-meme-lord-mcgee-arlluk" class="tumblr_blog">minority-privilege</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://shybutnotsilent.tumblr.com/post/115105252465/meme-lord-mcgee-arlluk-there-are-actual-people" class="tumblr_blog">shybutnotsilent</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://meme-lord-mcgee.tumblr.com/post/114949586105/arlluk-there-are-actual-people-out-there-who" class="tumblr_blog">meme-lord-mcgee</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://arlluk.tumblr.com/post/114868595189/there-are-actual-people-out-there-who-want-to" class="tumblr_blog">arlluk</a>:</p><blockquote><p>there are actual people out there who want to genetically modify carnivores so they no longer eat other animals </p><p>im going to fly away from this planet goodbye</p></blockquote><p>yeah let’s just fuck up the entire ecosystem because i’m uncomfortable with the fact that nature doesn’t conform to my world-views.</p></blockquote><p>#hopefully satire</p><p><a href="http://www.hedweb.com/abolitionist-project/reprogramming-predators.html">I think I just crushed your hopes…</a> </p></blockquote> <p>fUCK</p></blockquote> <figure data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272" class="tmblr-full"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/1b4221dd6890985686af7493584c6f4f/tumblr_inline_nm2qknOHeY1tpkbb7.gif" alt="image" data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272"/></figure><figure data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272" class="tmblr-full"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/b309aa57414df2c775e2312d55cad0b4/tumblr_inline_nm2qksIUl21tpkbb7.gif" alt="image" data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272"/></figure><figure data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272" class="tmblr-full"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/3884b4b0be2ec8c28314f7b29113569b/tumblr_inline_nm2qkw11do1tpkbb7.gif" alt="image" data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272"/></figure><p>Once again, Matt Groening predicts the future.</p></blockquote> <p>Destroying entire ecosystems and throwing off the balance of nature because nature won’t coddle you.The epitome of human arrogance and childish nonsense. </p></blockquote> <p>this cannot even be real</p></blockquote> <p>Bye I’m leaving earth forever</p></blockquote>
Animals, Future, and Gif: TreeHugger
 11 minutes ago.
 treehugge
 What if prey didn't have to suffer?
 Meet the people who want to turn
 predators into vegans
 treehugger.com
<p><a href="http://bedpolebed.tumblr.com/post/123487680626/elegantly-effervescent-sodomymcscurvylegs" class="tumblr_blog">bedpolebed</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://elegantly-effervescent.tumblr.com/post/119110171700/sodomymcscurvylegs-starkillerrx" class="tumblr_blog">elegantly-effervescent</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://sodomymcscurvylegs.tumblr.com/post/115246259649/starkillerrx-minority-privilege" class="tumblr_blog">sodomymcscurvylegs</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://starkillerrx.tumblr.com/post/115113013309/minority-privilege-shybutnotsilent" class="tumblr_blog">starkillerrx</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://minority-privilege.tumblr.com/post/115109942145/shybutnotsilent-meme-lord-mcgee-arlluk" class="tumblr_blog">minority-privilege</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://shybutnotsilent.tumblr.com/post/115105252465/meme-lord-mcgee-arlluk-there-are-actual-people" class="tumblr_blog">shybutnotsilent</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://meme-lord-mcgee.tumblr.com/post/114949586105/arlluk-there-are-actual-people-out-there-who" class="tumblr_blog">meme-lord-mcgee</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://arlluk.tumblr.com/post/114868595189/there-are-actual-people-out-there-who-want-to" class="tumblr_blog">arlluk</a>:</p><blockquote><p>there are actual people out there who want to genetically modify carnivores so they no longer eat other animals </p><p>im going to fly away from this planet goodbye</p></blockquote><p>yeah let’s just fuck up the entire ecosystem because i’m uncomfortable with the fact that nature doesn’t conform to my world-views.</p></blockquote><p>#hopefully satire</p><p><a href="http://www.hedweb.com/abolitionist-project/reprogramming-predators.html">I think I just crushed your hopes…</a> </p></blockquote>

<p>fUCK</p></blockquote>

<figure data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272" class="tmblr-full"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/1b4221dd6890985686af7493584c6f4f/tumblr_inline_nm2qknOHeY1tpkbb7.gif" alt="image" data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272"/></figure><figure data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272" class="tmblr-full"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/b309aa57414df2c775e2312d55cad0b4/tumblr_inline_nm2qksIUl21tpkbb7.gif" alt="image" data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272"/></figure><figure data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272" class="tmblr-full"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/3884b4b0be2ec8c28314f7b29113569b/tumblr_inline_nm2qkw11do1tpkbb7.gif" alt="image" data-orig-width="480" data-orig-height="272"/></figure><p>Once again, Matt Groening predicts the future.</p></blockquote>

<p>Destroying entire ecosystems and throwing off the balance of nature because nature won’t coddle you.The epitome of human arrogance and childish nonsense.

</p></blockquote>

<p>this cannot even be real</p></blockquote>

<p>Bye I’m leaving earth forever</p></blockquote>

bedpolebed: elegantly-effervescent: sodomymcscurvylegs:starkillerrx:minority-privilege:shybutnotsilent:meme-lord-mcgee:arlluk:there are ac...

Tumblr, Taxes, and Progressive: CLINTON - GORE 1992 <p><a href="http://bill-11b.tumblr.com/post/123788360646/proudblackconservative-but-by-all-means" class="tumblr_blog">bill-11b</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://proudblackconservative.tumblr.com/post/123787372104/but-by-all-means-continue-pretending-that-the" class="tumblr_blog">proudblackconservative</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>But by all means, continue pretending that the flag is some treasured relic of brave Republicans fighting government oppression.</p></blockquote> <p>Republicans wanted to abolish slavery, but does anyone really believe it was just because they were good hearted people? Really? Politicians have always been politicians. <br/>Progressive Republicans wanted to end slavery for the same reason Progressive Democrats want to open the borders and let anyone from anywhere be a citizen; votes. They wanted votes. And up until the civil rights era, a Democrat couldn’t get a black vote if he paid for it. <br/>The right to own slaves was not the only right the Confederate states were concerned with. The north had been piggybacking off of the south for a long while in the form of raised taxes. <br/>When the south seceded, after Lincolns election, no one was seriously talking about abolition. Lincoln wasn’t even an abolitionist, he simply didn’t want slavery to spread to any new states. <br/></p></blockquote> <p>I know literally all of that and it doesn’t change my opinion of that flag one iota. I know about less than pure motives. I know about the triangle trade. I know there were abolitionists in the South and pro-slave people in the North. I know about tax issues. But the major catalyst for the war was the question of representation of slave and free states and the spread of slavery. It was basically an extension of the question that was posed during the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and put off to be dealt with at a later time. The institution of slavery and its economical ramifications (for both the North and South) were huge starting points for the war.</p>
Tumblr, Taxes, and Progressive: CLINTON - GORE
 1992
<p><a href="http://bill-11b.tumblr.com/post/123788360646/proudblackconservative-but-by-all-means" class="tumblr_blog">bill-11b</a>:</p><blockquote><p><a href="http://proudblackconservative.tumblr.com/post/123787372104/but-by-all-means-continue-pretending-that-the" class="tumblr_blog">proudblackconservative</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>But by all means, continue pretending that the flag is some treasured relic of brave Republicans fighting government oppression.</p></blockquote>

<p>Republicans wanted to abolish slavery, but does anyone really believe it was just because they were good hearted people? Really? Politicians have always been politicians. <br/>Progressive Republicans wanted to end slavery for the same reason Progressive Democrats want to open the borders and let anyone from anywhere be a citizen; votes. They wanted votes. And up until the civil rights era, a Democrat couldn’t get a black vote if he paid for it. <br/>The right to own slaves was not the only right the Confederate states were concerned with. The north had been piggybacking off of the south for a long while in the form of raised taxes. <br/>When the south seceded, after Lincolns election, no one was seriously talking about abolition. Lincoln wasn’t even an abolitionist, he simply didn’t want slavery to spread to any new states. <br/></p></blockquote>
<p>I know literally all of that and it doesn’t change my opinion of that flag one iota. I know about less than pure motives. I know about the triangle trade. I know there were abolitionists in the South and pro-slave people in the North. I know about tax issues. But the major catalyst for the war was the question of representation of slave and free states and the spread of slavery. It was basically an extension of the question that was posed during the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and put off to be dealt with at a later time. The institution of slavery and its economical ramifications (for both the North and South) were huge starting points for the war.</p>

bill-11b:proudblackconservative: But by all means, continue pretending that the flag is some treasured relic of brave Republicans fighting ...

Abraham Lincoln, Alive, and Life: UNOLE TOM'S CABIN OB, LIFE AMONG THE LOWLY. BY HARRIET BEECHER STOWE. VOL. I ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH THOUSAND. BOST O N: JOHN P. JEWETT & COMPANY CLEVELAND, OHIO: JEWETT, PROCTOR & WORTHINGTON. 1852. <p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/120797926895/june-5th-1851-uncle-toms-cabin-begins" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p> <blockquote><h2><b>June 5th 1851: <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> begins publication</b></h2><p><small>On this day in 1851, the first installment of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> appeared in abolitionist newspaper the <i>National Era, </i>beginning a serial which lasted for forty weeks. <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> tells the story of a black slave and recounts the harsh reality of his enslavement. Stowe was an ardent advocate of the abolition of slavery, and wrote the novel in response to the passage of the controversial 1850 Fugitive Slave Act which was part of the Compromise of 1850. The Act ordered Northern citizens to assist in the return of runaway slaves from the South, thus forcing the generally anti-slavery North to become complicit in the continuance of the ‘peculiar institution’. The popular discontent over the slavery issue helped make <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> the best-selling novel of the nineteenth century and saw its translation into sixty languages. The novel helped keep the flames of anti-slavery sentiment alive, and is therefore sometimes attributed with helping start the American Civil War. Whilst still hailed as a great anti-slavery work of its day, the novel falls short of modern expectations with its stereotypical portrayal of African-Americans.</small></p><blockquote><b><i><small>“So you’re the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war”</small></i></b><br/><small>- what, according to legend, Abraham Lincoln said upon meeting Stowe in 1862</small></blockquote></blockquote>
Abraham Lincoln, Alive, and Life: UNOLE TOM'S CABIN
 OB,
 LIFE AMONG THE LOWLY.
 BY
 HARRIET BEECHER STOWE.
 VOL. I
 ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH THOUSAND.
 BOST O N:
 JOHN P. JEWETT & COMPANY
 CLEVELAND, OHIO:
 JEWETT, PROCTOR & WORTHINGTON.
 1852.
<p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/120797926895/june-5th-1851-uncle-toms-cabin-begins" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p>

<blockquote><h2><b>June 5th 1851: <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> begins publication</b></h2><p><small>On this day in 1851, the first installment of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> appeared in abolitionist newspaper the <i>National Era, </i>beginning a serial which lasted for forty weeks. <i>Uncle Tom’s 
Cabin</i> tells the story of a black slave and recounts the harsh reality 
of his enslavement. Stowe was an ardent advocate of the abolition of 
slavery, and wrote the novel in response to the passage of the 
controversial 1850 Fugitive Slave Act which was part of the Compromise 
of 1850. The Act ordered Northern citizens to assist in the return of 
runaway slaves from the South, thus forcing the generally anti-slavery 
North to become complicit in the continuance of the ‘peculiar 
institution’. The popular discontent over the slavery issue helped 
make <i>Uncle Tom’s Cabin</i> the best-selling novel of the nineteenth 
century and saw its translation into sixty languages. The novel helped 
keep the flames of anti-slavery sentiment alive, and is therefore 
sometimes attributed with helping start the American Civil War. Whilst 
still hailed as a great anti-slavery work of its day, the novel falls 
short of modern expectations with its stereotypical portrayal of 
African-Americans.</small></p><blockquote><b><i><small>“So you’re the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war”</small></i></b><br/><small>- what, according to legend, Abraham Lincoln said upon meeting Stowe in 1862</small></blockquote></blockquote>

todayinhistory: June 5th 1851: Uncle Tom’s Cabin begins publicationOn this day in 1851, the first installment of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Un...

Abraham Lincoln, Politics, and Tumblr: fortictb Congress of the dlnited States of 3merica Sessisn, RESOLUTION เลื่ xin Md 2tata aA.hsc a..MALAd ewe..+- な//u entd.a acan.ヴAu k.cout ta 4, wiltad, nt ut ee elat ちlundu ef ik.xnue effehu tatia- <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/109972439397/february-3rd-1870-fifteenth-amendment-ratified">todayinhistory</a>:</p><blockquote><h2><b>February 3rd 1870: Fifteenth Amendment ratified</b><br/></h2><p><small>On this day in 1870, the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified. This measure came as the third and last of the so-called ‘Reconstruction amendments’, passed after the end of the Civil War by the Radical Republicans in Congress. The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the country, expanding on President Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation which freed slaves in the Confederacy. The second Reconstruction Amendment, the Fourteenth, provided citizenship and equal protection for freedmen. The Fifteenth granted African-American men the right to vote. It was passed by Congress in February 1869, and received ratification from the requisite number of states the following year, being formally adopted in March 1870. For many abolitionists, this was the most important measure of the Reconstruction effort. In the words of black abolitionist Frederick Douglass, <b><i>&ldquo;slavery is not abolished until the black man has the ballot&rdquo;</i></b>. Black enfranchisement meant that for the first time in American history, African-Americans were elected to political office. These included first black Senator, Hiram Rhodes Revels, Representative Joseph Rainey, and Governor P.B.S. Pinchback of Louisiana (who until 1990 was the only black state governor in U.S. history). In states such as South Carolina, slaves made up a majority of the population, meaning that once enfranchised they dominated state politics. Despite being enshrined in constitutional law, African-Americans were prevented from voting through discriminatory measures like poll taxes, literacy tests, and grandfather clauses, as well as by the violent intimidation of the recently formed Ku Klux Klan. The 1965 Voting Rights Act, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, finally provided for the full registration of black voters in the U.S. This measure came in the larger context of the Civil Rights Movement, which also targetted post-Reconstruction injustices such as Jim Crow segregation.</small><br/></p><blockquote><b><i>&ldquo;The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude&rdquo;</i></b><br/></blockquote></blockquote>
Abraham Lincoln, Politics, and Tumblr: fortictb Congress of the dlnited States of 3merica
 Sessisn,
 RESOLUTION
 เลื่ xin
 Md
 2tata
 aA.hsc
 a..MALAd ewe..+-
 な//u entd.a acan.ヴAu k.cout ta 4, wiltad, nt
 ut ee
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 tatia-
<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/109972439397/february-3rd-1870-fifteenth-amendment-ratified">todayinhistory</a>:</p><blockquote><h2><b>February 3rd 1870: Fifteenth Amendment ratified</b><br/></h2><p><small>On this day in 1870, the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified. This measure came as the third and last of the so-called ‘Reconstruction amendments’, passed after the end of the Civil War by the Radical Republicans in Congress. The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the country, expanding on President Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation which freed slaves in the Confederacy. The second Reconstruction Amendment, the Fourteenth, provided citizenship and equal protection for freedmen. The Fifteenth granted African-American men the right to vote. It was passed by Congress in February 1869, and received ratification from the requisite number of states the following year, being formally adopted in March 1870. For many abolitionists, this was the most important measure of the Reconstruction effort. In the words of black abolitionist Frederick Douglass, <b><i>&ldquo;slavery is not abolished until the black man has the ballot&rdquo;</i></b>. Black enfranchisement meant that for the first time in American history, African-Americans were elected to political office. These included first black Senator, Hiram Rhodes Revels, Representative Joseph Rainey, and Governor P.B.S. Pinchback of Louisiana (who until 1990 was the only black state governor in U.S. history). In states such as South Carolina, slaves made up a majority of the population, meaning that once enfranchised they dominated state politics. Despite being enshrined in constitutional law, African-Americans were prevented from voting through discriminatory measures like poll taxes, literacy tests, and grandfather clauses, as well as by the violent intimidation of the recently formed Ku Klux Klan. The 1965 Voting Rights Act, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, finally provided for the full registration of black voters in the U.S. This measure came in the larger context of the Civil Rights Movement, which also targetted post-Reconstruction injustices such as Jim Crow segregation.</small><br/></p><blockquote><b><i>&ldquo;The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude&rdquo;</i></b><br/></blockquote></blockquote>

todayinhistory:February 3rd 1870: Fifteenth Amendment ratifiedOn this day in 1870, the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution...